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Jaak Treiman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1993
I trust your headline writer for Saturday's (Jan. 30) letters section has been told to write "The Baltics are not the Balkans" 1,000 times on a blackboard to be kept nearby. While the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania are struggling to convert to a market economy as Russia drags its heels in withdrawing the remainder of its occupation forces, the Balts are moving forward peacefully without the ethnic violence, which has so unfortunately consumed the Balkan region, some 1,000 miles to the south.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1993
I trust your headline writer for Saturday's (Jan. 30) letters section has been told to write "The Baltics are not the Balkans" 1,000 times on a blackboard to be kept nearby. While the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania are struggling to convert to a market economy as Russia drags its heels in withdrawing the remainder of its occupation forces, the Balts are moving forward peacefully without the ethnic violence, which has so unfortunately consumed the Balkan region, some 1,000 miles to the south.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1992
Without consulting either community, 800 people surreptitiously change their address from Canoga Park to Woodland Hills. So be it. The deal is done. I wonder, however, if both Canoga Park and Woodland Hills would have been better served if the people who spent their time orchestrating the change had instead channeled their energy into constructive community involvement through Canoga Park's more than a dozen community service organizations? If those who favored the change justified it because, "You have to go with the flow" or because it's easier to walk away from perceived problems, as two of the departing residents suggested, then the move may well be Woodland Hills' loss and Canoga Park's gain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1992
Without consulting either community, 800 people surreptitiously change their address from Canoga Park to Woodland Hills. So be it. The deal is done. I wonder, however, if both Canoga Park and Woodland Hills would have been better served if the people who spent their time orchestrating the change had instead channeled their energy into constructive community involvement through Canoga Park's more than a dozen community service organizations? If those who favored the change justified it because, "You have to go with the flow" or because it's easier to walk away from perceived problems, as two of the departing residents suggested, then the move may well be Woodland Hills' loss and Canoga Park's gain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1987
An article in the Aug. 25 Valley edition, entitled "Police Explode Facsimile Bomb in Canoga Park," refers to the "consulate of the small Soviet state of Estonia." This designation is grossly erroneous. The Soviet Union forcibly and illegally occupied the independent Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania during World War II. The United States, Canada, Great Britain, Belgium, Switzerland, Costa Rica and most other countries have refused to recognize the Soviet annexations of the Baltic States.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | MICHAEL SZYMANSKI, Szymanski is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
Their countries no longer exist as independent entities. They have no governments to report to. Yet, three diplomats from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania still wave their flags in Los Angeles with hopes that someday soon they will be representing more than a dream. For almost half a century, Los Angeles has been the only city in the world with honorary consulates for all three Baltic states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1988
Medvedev's article shows that myth perpetuation has not died with the coming of glasnost . Medvedev's statement that the "Bolsheviks would never have won their war and created the Soviet Union," without the support of Latvians, Etonians and other minorities implies that the Bolshevik seizure of power was a manifestation of the popular will of those "minorities." The Latvian and Estonian people, along with the Lithuanians, used the opportunity presented by the Russian Revolution and, after defeating the Soviet military, became independent, democratic countries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1989
The Bush-Gorbachev meeting presents President Bush an ideal opportunity to reaffirm America's non-recognition policy concerning the Soviet occupation of the Baltic states. It is also a chance for America to pursue the corollary of the non-recognition policy, namely, that Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania must have their independence restored. The December conference should be used by President Bush to pursue a diplomatic solution to the Soviet occupation of the Baltic states, patterned on the Austrian experience, whereby Soviet troops are withdrawn and all of the Baltic states resume their status as neutral, independent nations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1993 | CONSTANCE SOMMER
Nine Baltic scholars will learn how the American university system works when they participate in next month's Baltic Institute at Cal Lutheran University. The selected professors are from the three former Soviet states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, which are collectively known as the Baltics. The second annual institute, underwritten by the United States Information Service, runs from Saturday through July 24 at the Thousand Oaks campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1991
A year and a half ago, a band of Southern California residents advocating freedom for the Baltics met at a downtown Los Angeles hotel. The air crackled with excitement at that Baltic-American Freedom League meeting; Lithuania had declared independence, and apprehension ran high about a Soviet crackdown. That night, the group heard from Curtis Kammen, deputy assistant secretary of state. What a difference the sudden tide of history can make.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | MICHAEL SZYMANSKI, Szymanski is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
Their countries no longer exist as independent entities. They have no governments to report to. Yet, three diplomats from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania still wave their flags in Los Angeles with hopes that someday soon they will be representing more than a dream. For almost half a century, Los Angeles has been the only city in the world with honorary consulates for all three Baltic states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1987
An article in the Aug. 25 Valley edition, entitled "Police Explode Facsimile Bomb in Canoga Park," refers to the "consulate of the small Soviet state of Estonia." This designation is grossly erroneous. The Soviet Union forcibly and illegally occupied the independent Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania during World War II. The United States, Canada, Great Britain, Belgium, Switzerland, Costa Rica and most other countries have refused to recognize the Soviet annexations of the Baltic States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1993 | JILL LEOVY
Scores of young faces will invade the workplaces of West Valley Tuesday as more than 60 businesses take part in an areawide "career day" for high schoolers. The career day, organized by the Canoga Park, Reseda and Tarzana chambers of commerce and the Canoga Park-based Keep Youth Doing Something program, was first held last year with about 50 students from local high schools, and has been expanded to include about 80 students this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1989 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pro-democracy leaders in Estonia, hoping to elect the first non-Communist congress in the Baltic republic since the Soviet Union occupied it during World War II, are conducting a worldwide drive to register Estonians to vote, a spokesman said Sunday.
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