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Jabbar Al Ahmed Sheik Sabah

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NEWS
March 15, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's exiled emir, Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah, extended an emotional greeting to his Cabinet on Thursday as he returned to the liberated Gulf emirate for the first time since fleeing to safety against a storm of advancing Iraqi tanks. Sheik Jabbar covered his face with his hands as he stepped from a blue-and-white Kuwait Airways jet and then stooped to kiss the ground at Kuwait's international airport.
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NEWS
June 5, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's democratic movement mobilized Tuesday as close to 1,000 people met outside a mosque to oppose their emir's decision not to hold elections until October, 1992. "We want to tell people that the complete freedom of Kuwait has not happened yet," said Ahmed Bakir, a member of the Parliament that the emir dissolved in 1986. "The legitimate government of Kuwait is not back yet."
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NEWS
February 27, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The handwriting of the smuggled letter was barely legible, the undisciplined scrawl of a teen-ager. But there was nothing childish in the words, a pledge of determination for the freedom that Kuwaiti opposition leaders say will transform their nation from a feudal sheikdom into a real democracy. "You can be proud," the 16-year-old wrote to his parents from the underground, within the resistance movement in Iraqi-occupied Kuwait. "I am a man now and I will never be driven out.
NEWS
May 28, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's government extended military rule for 30 days on Monday, one day after its crown prince denounced continuing human rights abuses, including abduction and torture by well-armed vigilantes. Kuwait's emir, Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah, quietly extended the martial law decree that has governed Kuwaitis since allied forces liberated their nation three months ago.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opposition leaders balked Monday at signing on to a new interim government in Kuwait, complaining that the ruling emir did not commit to a speedy restoration of the dissolved national Parliament.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The exiled emir of Kuwait told President Bush on Friday that Iraq is brazenly pillaging and repopulating the occupied desert kingdom, a report that prompted the President's national security adviser to warn that the timetable for military action may be shortening. Standing alongside Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah, the Kuwaiti ruler, after two hours of meetings, Bush declared: "Iraq will fail. Kuwait, free Kuwait, will endure."
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He lies in a hospital bed unable to move, unable to work, unable to do much of anything except try to remember who the man was who came to the door one night shortly after Kuwait was liberated, greeted him politely and pulled out a gun. Hamad Jouan, a former member of Parliament and a leader of the pro-democracy movement in Kuwait, knows he had seen the man before.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Administration's proposed sale of $7.6 billion in arms to Saudi Arabia was received with criticism and caution on Capitol Hill on Thursday, but key lawmakers indicated that they probably would support it, despite charges that the White House had broken a promise to limit the sale to items essential to urgent Saudi defense needs. Bowing to congressional pressure, the White House sent a scaled-down version of its original $21-billion Saudi arms package to Congress on Thursday.
NEWS
April 8, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's ruling emir, in the face of widespread public disillusionment with his government, vowed Sunday to hold national elections for a new parliament within the next year and said he will encourage U.S. troops to remain in Kuwait as long as Saddam Hussein remains in power in Iraq.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's democratic movement mobilized Tuesday as close to 1,000 people met outside a mosque to oppose their emir's decision not to hold elections until October, 1992. "We want to tell people that the complete freedom of Kuwait has not happened yet," said Ahmed Bakir, a member of the Parliament that the emir dissolved in 1986. "The legitimate government of Kuwait is not back yet."
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, clearly concerned about reports of summary executions and business-as-usual autocracy in postwar Kuwait, told the emir Monday that Washington's future political and military support will be affected by the country's human rights record.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opposition leaders balked Monday at signing on to a new interim government in Kuwait, complaining that the ruling emir did not commit to a speedy restoration of the dissolved national Parliament.
NEWS
April 8, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's ruling emir, in the face of widespread public disillusionment with his government, vowed Sunday to hold national elections for a new parliament within the next year and said he will encourage U.S. troops to remain in Kuwait as long as Saddam Hussein remains in power in Iraq.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | Reuters
A day after returning from exile in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait's emir toured the charred wreckage of the Persian Gulf War's most spectacular killing field. The site, nicknamed "Ambush Alley," has become a macabre tourist attraction for off-duty soldiers and visiting American politicians. Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah drove stony-faced past hundreds of burned-out military and civilian vehicles that littered the highway after U.S.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kuwait's exiled emir, Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah, extended an emotional greeting to his Cabinet on Thursday as he returned to the liberated Gulf emirate for the first time since fleeing to safety against a storm of advancing Iraqi tanks. Sheik Jabbar covered his face with his hands as he stepped from a blue-and-white Kuwait Airways jet and then stooped to kiss the ground at Kuwait's international airport.
NEWS
March 13, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, architect of the allied campaign that drove the Iraqi army from Kuwait, paid his first visit to the liberated emirate on Tuesday. Walking on a Persian Gulf beach with Gen. Jabbar al Sabah, the commanding general of Kuwait's armed forces, Schwarzkopf stopped, bent over and filled two small bottles with sand. "This is sand from the liberated beaches of Kuwait," Schwarzkopf said. " . . . We're very proud to be able to do this. . . .
NEWS
March 2, 1991
"Kuwait is liberated," President Bush told the world in an address from the Oval Office. "Iraq's army is defeated. Our military objectives are met." And so, for Kuwait's exiled leadership, the future is now. The leaders will return to a country in the midst of celebration--but will face the formidable task of recovering from the war.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, clearly concerned about reports of summary executions and business-as-usual autocracy in postwar Kuwait, told the emir Monday that Washington's future political and military support will be affected by the country's human rights record.
NEWS
March 10, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah, the ruler who fled Kuwait just ahead of Iraq's invasion seven months ago, announced Saturday that he has decided to return home this week and said he is firmly committed to moving his country toward democracy. "Absolutely, we are agreed on that," the emir told reporters at the Sheraton Hotel here, where he has been in exile, in response to a question about democratization. "According to the constitution, we will walk that path."
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He lies in a hospital bed unable to move, unable to work, unable to do much of anything except try to remember who the man was who came to the door one night shortly after Kuwait was liberated, greeted him politely and pulled out a gun. Hamad Jouan, a former member of Parliament and a leader of the pro-democracy movement in Kuwait, knows he had seen the man before.
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