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Jack Beatty

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1988
Beatty certainly left no stone unthrown in his lambasting verbal crucifixion of Robertson as "either an utter fool or a smarmy con man," although it was clear his jabs were also intended for fundamental Christians. It is a dangerous practice to make sweeping generalizations about any group of people, whether they are born-again Christians, politicians or news media people. Lumping together some 35 million born-again Christians as Robertson supporters because they are Christians is about as intelligent as claiming that some 240 million Americans are Ronald Reagan supporters because they are American.
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April 15, 2007 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch is the author, most recently, of "A History of the End of the World: How the Most Controversial Book in the Bible Changed the Course of Western Civilization."
JACK BEATTY'S "Age of Betrayal," a work of history about the role of the railroads in the making of America, is illuminated and enlivened by its author's eye for the telling detail. To illustrate the power that the railroads wielded in the 19th century, Beatty informs us at the outset that "Americans set their watches to eighty local times" -- until the men who ran the railways decided to standardize the time zones across the continent for the convenience of their timetables.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1987
Jack Beatty's written monologue (Op-Ed Page, Aug. 20) on Sen. Paul Simon's (D-Ill.) down-to-earth approach to cure the national ills is a welcome breeze, with a possibility of such force that it has given me a glimmer of hope for the future of this country. If candidate Simon's prescription for healing this great country's problems of unemployment, education and health care can become a reality, I'd say it behooves all of us to make that man our next President. Democrats and Republicans unite!
BOOKS
February 8, 1998 | ANDREW STARK, Andrew Stark teaches management at the University of Toronto. He recently completed a book about conflict of interest in American public life
The relationship between practicing managers and management professors--fruitful though it often is--displays a strand of mutual contempt. What manager, leafing through a best-selling professor's latest 300-page recipe for re-engineering, downsizing, empowering or intrapreneuring, has not wondered: "If you're so smart, how come you're not rich?"
BOOKS
September 29, 1991
I feel myself grieving again for Marilyn Monroe after reading Jack Beatty's review of the book "A Question of Character" by Thomas C. Reeves (June 23), though the story he recounted wasn't entirely news. Many of us loved Marilyn for unexplainable reasons and were saddened when we learned of her death, but now that the news is convincingly out about her relationship to John and Robert Kennedy, I feel a new sadness, more honestly realized than when I was 13, for her suffering and death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1988
According to a news story in The Times (Part I, Aug. 15) Republicans hoping to elect George Bush President are pitching hard for the Jewish vote with a "sleeper" plank in their convention platform, which opposes a Palestinian state and a U.N. resolution saying that Zionism is racism. The Mideast plank won immediate approval from the American Israel Public Affairs Committee. Tom Dine, its executive director, felt that this plank is the best ever on U.S.-Israel relations by either party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1988
We write to take issue with the article by Jack Beatty (Op-Ed Page, April 15) wherein he concurs with a suggestion (by conservative political analyst Norman Ornstein) for a Dukakis-(Georgia Sen. Sam) Nunn ticket for the Democratic Party. While it is highly improbable that Ornstein has the good fortune of the Democratic Party genuinely at heart, our specific objection is to Beatty's gratuitous slam at National Organization for Women President Molly Yard and NOW, as the only element in the party that would object to putting Nunn on the presidential track.
BOOKS
April 15, 2007 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch is the author, most recently, of "A History of the End of the World: How the Most Controversial Book in the Bible Changed the Course of Western Civilization."
JACK BEATTY'S "Age of Betrayal," a work of history about the role of the railroads in the making of America, is illuminated and enlivened by its author's eye for the telling detail. To illustrate the power that the railroads wielded in the 19th century, Beatty informs us at the outset that "Americans set their watches to eighty local times" -- until the men who ran the railways decided to standardize the time zones across the continent for the convenience of their timetables.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1992 | JACK BEATTY, Jack Beatty is a senior editor of the Atlantic Monthly and author of the just-published biography of James Michael Curley, "The Rascal King" (Addison-Wesley).
An old man looking back on the century he had lived through, Walter Lippmann, wrote that three times he had seen a Democratic President elected with a mandate to pursue a sweeping domestic agenda, and three times foreign wars had supervened, derailing the President's agenda and, in two of the cases, destroying the President.
NEWS
January 15, 1993 | CONSTANCE CASEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bookstore browsers, hefting this biography, might wonder why they should read hundreds of pages about a crooked and comical Boston Irish politician (mayor, governor and member of Congress) who died in 1958 and hasn't been causing much trouble lately. The reason is that Beatty's book is a delight--rich, witty, flowing and full of insight about the nature of political corruption.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1992 | JACK BEATTY, Jack Beatty is a senior editor of the Atlantic Monthly and author of the just-published biography of James Michael Curley, "The Rascal King" (Addison-Wesley).
An old man looking back on the century he had lived through, Walter Lippmann, wrote that three times he had seen a Democratic President elected with a mandate to pursue a sweeping domestic agenda, and three times foreign wars had supervened, derailing the President's agenda and, in two of the cases, destroying the President.
BOOKS
September 29, 1991
I feel myself grieving again for Marilyn Monroe after reading Jack Beatty's review of the book "A Question of Character" by Thomas C. Reeves (June 23), though the story he recounted wasn't entirely news. Many of us loved Marilyn for unexplainable reasons and were saddened when we learned of her death, but now that the news is convincingly out about her relationship to John and Robert Kennedy, I feel a new sadness, more honestly realized than when I was 13, for her suffering and death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1988
According to a news story in The Times (Part I, Aug. 15) Republicans hoping to elect George Bush President are pitching hard for the Jewish vote with a "sleeper" plank in their convention platform, which opposes a Palestinian state and a U.N. resolution saying that Zionism is racism. The Mideast plank won immediate approval from the American Israel Public Affairs Committee. Tom Dine, its executive director, felt that this plank is the best ever on U.S.-Israel relations by either party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1988
We write to take issue with the article by Jack Beatty (Op-Ed Page, April 15) wherein he concurs with a suggestion (by conservative political analyst Norman Ornstein) for a Dukakis-(Georgia Sen. Sam) Nunn ticket for the Democratic Party. While it is highly improbable that Ornstein has the good fortune of the Democratic Party genuinely at heart, our specific objection is to Beatty's gratuitous slam at National Organization for Women President Molly Yard and NOW, as the only element in the party that would object to putting Nunn on the presidential track.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1988
Beatty certainly left no stone unthrown in his lambasting verbal crucifixion of Robertson as "either an utter fool or a smarmy con man," although it was clear his jabs were also intended for fundamental Christians. It is a dangerous practice to make sweeping generalizations about any group of people, whether they are born-again Christians, politicians or news media people. Lumping together some 35 million born-again Christians as Robertson supporters because they are Christians is about as intelligent as claiming that some 240 million Americans are Ronald Reagan supporters because they are American.
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