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Jack Bogle

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BUSINESS
July 2, 1999 | Bloomberg News
Vanguard Group's flagship mutual fund, which mimics the Standard & Poor's 500 index, crossed the $90-billion mark in assets and moved closer to becoming America's biggest mutual fund. Vanguard Index 500 Fund had $92.7 billion in assets under management at the close of business Wednesday, said John Woerth, a company spokesman. Fidelity Investments' Magellan Fund, managed by Bob Stansky, had $97.6 billion.
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BUSINESS
August 13, 1999 | PAUL J. LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vanguard Group, the nation's second-largest mutual fund company, suddenly is facing mounting speculation about a clash in its executive suite. Published comments by Vanguard's founder and senior chairman, John C. Bogle Sr., suggest rising tension between Bogle and his handpicked successor, Chairman John J. Brennan.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2002 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of institutional investors led by Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle met Monday in New York to launch a campaign aimed at boosting corporate managers' accountability to shareholders. The meeting, partly a response to Enron Corp.'s collapse and the firestorm it fueled over corporate practices and financial disclosure, included well-known Legg Mason Inc.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2002 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vanguard Group may be best known for its "passive," index-style investing, but the mutual fund giant said it would begin taking a more activist role in corporate governance: The firm has revamped the standards it will follow in proxy voting, putting companies on notice about key governance issues.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2002 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing number of mutual fund managers are taking executive pay policies into account when deciding where to invest, according to a new survey. It may be high time that individual investors do the same, industry experts say. "Outlandish compensation should be a compelling warning sign for any investor," said Nell Minow, editor of the Corporate Library, a Web site that focuses on corporate governance issues. "It is a symptom of a bad board" of directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2005 | Lee Drutman, Special to The Times
TO hear it from the folks on Wall Street, Michael Milken's downfall was "all about the blind political ambition of Rudy Giuliani," leveraged buyouts were "to the public's benefit to a certain extent" and "the public is just as much at fault" for the technology stock bubble of the '90s as anyone. Such are some of the insights from financial journalist Eric J.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1996 | CHARLES A. JAFFE, Charles A. Jaffe is personal finance columnist at the Boston Globe
Jack Bogle had a change of heart, not principles. Now he is urging both individual investors and mutual fund companies to change their attitude. In his first public address since receiving a heart transplant in February, the chairman and founder of the Vanguard Group--the world's second-largest mutual fund company--sounded a warning that should not be ignored.
NEWS
April 9, 2001 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you think it's finally time to start loading up on what's beaten down in the market, you're probably looking at growth stocks or growth-stock mutual funds. No question, the damage has been dramatic over the last two quarters. And picking the ultimate bottom is nearly impossible. So, you may figure, why not start at least nibbling now?
BUSINESS
September 26, 1999 | PAUL J. LIM
Twenty-five years after "Saint Jack" Bogle launched his crusade for so-called index investing, many investors have finally found religion. Now the question is, are the fanatics running away with the concept? Saint Jack is the industry nickname for John C. Bogle Sr., a founding father of the $6-trillion mutual fund industry and former chairman of Vanguard Group, now the nation's second-largest fund company.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2002 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shareholders and corporate activists have been complaining for years about runaway executive pay. But in 2002--the year of Enron, E-Trade and Ebbers--the voices for change finally are finding an audience. Across corporate America this spring, company managers have been fighting shareholder resolutions seeking to put limits on how much the top bosses can be paid.
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