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BUSINESS
November 3, 1986
A group led by Bernard Garrett, former chairman of Stater Bros. grocery store chain, agreed to sell its stock to a group led by Jack Brown, current chairman and chief executive of Stater. The Garrett group previously had agreed to sell the stock to Craig Corp., an ally of the Brown group. But the Brown group under a previous agreement had to be given an opportunity to buy the stock first. The Brown group said it will pay nearly $18.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
Stater Bros. Markets has ended a potential food fight, saying Monday that it would sell its Santee Dairies milk processing division to Dean Foods, owner of the Alta Dena and Horizon Organic brands. Rival grocery chains were starting to refuse to buy the milk processor's Knudsen brand and other products because they believed they were helping a competitor, leaving Santee with little opportunity for growth, said Jack Brown, chief executive and owner of Stater Bros. Holdings Inc.
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BUSINESS
February 9, 1986
Despite strong sales increases, Gish Biomedical Inc. in Santa Ana last week reported second-quarter losses of $178,000, largely due to the costs of winning government approval for its new ophthalmic laser. In the year-ago period, the company had net income of $22,700. For the period ended Dec. 31, 1985, the medical equipment maker had revenues of $1.7 million, up 30% from the prior year's $1.3 million.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1986
A group led by Bernard Garrett, former chairman of Stater Bros. grocery store chain, agreed to sell its stock to a group led by Jack Brown, current chairman and chief executive of Stater. The Garrett group previously had agreed to sell the stock to Craig Corp., an ally of the Brown group. But the Brown group under a previous agreement had to be given an opportunity to buy the stock first. The Brown group said it will pay nearly $18.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1986 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
Just beneath the surface of the corporate battle for control of Stater Bros., a chain of 94 Southern California supermarkets based in Colton, is a bitter personal feud between two men with vastly different personalities and backgrounds. In one corner is Jack Brown, a gregarious, 46-year-old native of San Bernardino who started out as a box boy at a neighborhood store and became president and chief executive of Stater Bros., one of the Inland Empire's largest private employers.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1986 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Some sported hats and stickers demanding "Bring Jack Back." Also in the mostly suit-and-tie crowd Monday were a few T-shirts proclaiming "Brownbo First Blood Part 3." But whether Jack Brown, ousted president of the Stater Bros. grocery chain, will be brought back won't be known until late today at the earliest. That's when the Colton-based chain will make public the results of shareholder voting at Monday's annual meeting, where two large shareholder groups faced off for control of the company.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, as online grocers fed with huge amounts of money were sprouting up, a tiny Aliso Viejo service began taking grocery orders over the Internet and making deliveries to buyers in south Orange County. WhyRunOut.com seemed an unlikely rival to huge outfits such as HomeGrocer.com and WebVan Group, which bought fleets of trucks, built big warehouses and made bigger headlines. But WebVan, which took over HomeGrocer last year, posted losses of more than $1 billion before closing Monday.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For many Orange County executives, 1991 was a year when their pay packages came under greater shareholder scrutiny and corporate boards were cautious in handing out cash bonuses and perks. It mirrored a trend statewide of keeping executive compensation in line with a company's financial performance. Of the top 100 county executives on the list of publicly traded companies, one-third of the officers saw their cash compensation remain unchanged or had it reduced.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
Stater Bros. Markets has ended a potential food fight, saying Monday that it would sell its Santee Dairies milk processing division to Dean Foods, owner of the Alta Dena and Horizon Organic brands. Rival grocery chains were starting to refuse to buy the milk processor's Knudsen brand and other products because they believed they were helping a competitor, leaving Santee with little opportunity for growth, said Jack Brown, chief executive and owner of Stater Bros. Holdings Inc.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1986 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Some sported hats and stickers demanding "Bring Jack Back." Also in the mostly suit-and-tie crowd Monday were a few T-shirts proclaiming "Brownbo First Blood Part 3." But whether Jack Brown, ousted president of the Stater Bros. grocery chain, will be brought back won't be known until late today at the earliest. That's when the Colton-based chain will make public the results of shareholder voting at Monday's annual meeting, where two large shareholder groups faced off for control of the company.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1986 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
Just beneath the surface of the corporate battle for control of Stater Bros., a chain of 94 Southern California supermarkets based in Colton, is a bitter personal feud between two men with vastly different personalities and backgrounds. In one corner is Jack Brown, a gregarious, 46-year-old native of San Bernardino who started out as a box boy at a neighborhood store and became president and chief executive of Stater Bros., one of the Inland Empire's largest private employers.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1986
Despite strong sales increases, Gish Biomedical Inc. in Santa Ana last week reported second-quarter losses of $178,000, largely due to the costs of winning government approval for its new ophthalmic laser. In the year-ago period, the company had net income of $22,700. For the period ended Dec. 31, 1985, the medical equipment maker had revenues of $1.7 million, up 30% from the prior year's $1.3 million.
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