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Jack C Davis

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BUSINESS
January 3, 1989 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
One of the nicknames given John K. Castle a few years ago by some of the people who worked for him on Wall Street was the "Doberman Pinscher." The inspiration for the nickname was Castle's tough, intimidating way of running things at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, the Wall Street investment firm where he ran day-to-day operations as president for more than five years and served for nearly two years as chief executive. Some likened Castle's abrasive management style to that of Gen. George S.
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NEWS
June 25, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sunday after winning a bitter electoral battle to build the San Francisco 49ers a new stadium, bad boy political consultant Jack Davis did the last thing his many enemies would expect: He went to church. And as the powerful waves of gospel music washed over him, Davis says, the most feared man in San Francisco politics thought about quitting the bare-knuckles profession he has reveled in for two decades.
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NEWS
June 25, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sunday after winning a bitter electoral battle to build the San Francisco 49ers a new stadium, bad boy political consultant Jack Davis did the last thing his many enemies would expect: He went to church. And as the powerful waves of gospel music washed over him, Davis says, the most feared man in San Francisco politics thought about quitting the bare-knuckles profession he has reveled in for two decades.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1989 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
One of the nicknames given John K. Castle a few years ago by some of the people who worked for him on Wall Street was the "Doberman Pinscher." The inspiration for the nickname was Castle's tough, intimidating way of running things at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, the Wall Street investment firm where he ran day-to-day operations as president for more than five years and served for nearly two years as chief executive. Some likened Castle's abrasive management style to that of Gen. George S.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1988
Dataproducts said it has agreed to a joint venture with Wenger Printers, a computer printer maker based in Switzerland. Jack C. Davis, chairman and chief executive of the Woodland Hills company, will sit on Wenger's board of directors.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1986 | JAMES BATES
Dataproducts Corp. on Wednesday named as its chairman and chief executive Jack C. Davis, 47, a former Harris Corp. senior vice president. He will replace Graham Tyson, a co-founder of the Woodland Hills-based company, which is the nation's largest independent manufacturer of computer printers. Davis has been in charge of information systems for Harris, a Melbourne, Fla.-based computer company.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1990
David J. Greene & Co., a New York investment firm that owns 5.2% of Dataproducts, has urged the Woodland Hills company to take additional steps to lift the price of its stock. In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Greene said it has held talks with Dataproducts management in which the firm urged that Dataproducts buy back more of its shares. The computer-printer maker recently repurchased 20% of its stock for $10 a share. The stock has been trading at about $6.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1989
A New York investors' group renewed its bid to acquire control of Dataproducts Corp., saying it plans to launch a tender offer for the Woodland Hills-based company and to seek the ouster of its directors. The group, DPC Acquisition Partners, which owns 8% of Dataproducts' stock, did not indicate when or at what price it might launch the tender offer for the maker of computer printers. A group spokesman, James M. Hennessy, declined comment. Dataproducts Chairman Jack C.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1989
Dataproducts, a Woodland Hills manufacturer of computer printers, said industrywide softness in the computer industry contributed to a 98% plunge in its fiscal first-quarter profit compared with a year earlier. In the three months that ended June 24, Dataproducts' net income fell to $17,000 from $810,000 a year ago, while its revenue slipped 3% to $83.3 million from $85.5 million. Although there are some signs of strength in selected areas of the U.S.
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