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Jack Cardiff

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2011 | By Sheri Linden
The word "painterly" is perhaps too often applied to cinematography, but in the case of Jack Cardiff it couldn't be more apt. He was a painter as well as one of the true innovators in the history of moviemaking, and it was with a painter's eye that he approached the use of color on celluloid. "Cameraman: The Life & Work of Jack Cardiff" is filled with gloriously vivid HD clips of his groundbreaking work in such films as "The Red Shoes" and "Black Narcissus," as well as rich anecdotes from Cardiff, who died in 2009.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2012
SERIES The Secret Circle: "Hunter's" Stepfanie Kramer guest stars on a new episode of the supernatural drama (9 p.m. KTLA). Project Runway All Stars: Past contestants get another shot at winning it all as the fashion-themed reality competition returns (9 p.m. Lifetime). American Stuffers: It's all about the taxidermy in this new documentary series (10 p.m. Animal Planet). Big Shrimpin': This docu-series about shrimp boats and their crews offers its season finale (10 p.m. History)
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Matthew Libatique, cinematographer on such movies as "Black Swan," "Iron Man" and "The Fountain," follows a certain routine before he starts a film. He studies paintings and photographs for inspiration and rewatches two British classics: 1947's "Black Narcissus" and 1948's "The Red Shoes. " Those two films, directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, were visually arresting thanks to cinematographer Jack Cardiff, whose nine-decade career in movies began with silent films and lasted into the 21st century.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2011 | By Sheri Linden
The word "painterly" is perhaps too often applied to cinematography, but in the case of Jack Cardiff it couldn't be more apt. He was a painter as well as one of the true innovators in the history of moviemaking, and it was with a painter's eye that he approached the use of color on celluloid. "Cameraman: The Life & Work of Jack Cardiff" is filled with gloriously vivid HD clips of his groundbreaking work in such films as "The Red Shoes" and "Black Narcissus," as well as rich anecdotes from Cardiff, who died in 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2001 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a regular contributor to Calendar
"You have to look hard at the things you love. I looked hard at paintings, and I learned about light." Those simple sentences perfectly encapsulate the long life's work of Jack Cardiff, widely regarded as one of the world's great cinematographers. At 86, with more than 100 films to his credit, the English-born Cardiff will receive an honorary Oscar at the Academy Awards ceremony next Sunday--the first honorary Oscar ever given primarily for achievements in cinematography. (In 1952, George A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
You've read about it, heard about it, maybe even dreamed about it. The UCLA Film & Television Archive restoration of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's much-beloved 1948 "The Red Shoes," a sensation at Cannes, is having its North American debut at the Hammer Museum's Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood. The UCLA restoration does full justice to one of the most exquisite color films ever made.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2012
SERIES The Secret Circle: "Hunter's" Stepfanie Kramer guest stars on a new episode of the supernatural drama (9 p.m. KTLA). Project Runway All Stars: Past contestants get another shot at winning it all as the fashion-themed reality competition returns (9 p.m. Lifetime). American Stuffers: It's all about the taxidermy in this new documentary series (10 p.m. Animal Planet). Big Shrimpin': This docu-series about shrimp boats and their crews offers its season finale (10 p.m. History)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
JACK CARDIFF, one of the cinema's most treasured cinematographers, will be making two rare appearances in Los Angeles to discuss his work on the classic Technicolor films "Black Narcissus" (1947), for which he won the Academy Award, and 1951's "The African Queen." On Thursday, Cardiff, 91, will appear at the academy's Samuel Goldwyn Theater for a screening of the new digital restoration of "Black Narcissus" by Granada International and the British Film Institute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Jack Cardiff, the British cinematographer who won an Academy Award for his stunning color work on the 1947 drama "Black Narcissus" and later became an Oscar-nominated director, has died. He was 94. Cardiff, who as a cinematographer was known as a pioneer of Technicolor and a "master of light," died Wednesday of age-related causes at his home in Ely, England, said Craig McCall, the producer and director of a pending documentary on Cardiff. "Jack was a great ambassador to film," McCall said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2001
FOREIGN FILM: "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," Taiwan ART DIRECTION: Tim Yip, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" CINEMATOGRAPHY: Peter Pau, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" COSTUME DESIGN: Janty Yates, "Gladiator" DOCUMENTARY FEATURE: "Into the Arms of Strangers: Stories of the Kindertransport," Mark Jonathan Harris, Deborah Oppenheimer DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT: "Big Mama," Tracy Seretean FILM EDITING: Stephen Mirrione, "Traffic" MAKEUP: Rick Baker, Gail Ryan, "Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Matthew Libatique, cinematographer on such movies as "Black Swan," "Iron Man" and "The Fountain," follows a certain routine before he starts a film. He studies paintings and photographs for inspiration and rewatches two British classics: 1947's "Black Narcissus" and 1948's "The Red Shoes. " Those two films, directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, were visually arresting thanks to cinematographer Jack Cardiff, whose nine-decade career in movies began with silent films and lasted into the 21st century.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
You've read about it, heard about it, maybe even dreamed about it. The UCLA Film & Television Archive restoration of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's much-beloved 1948 "The Red Shoes," a sensation at Cannes, is having its North American debut at the Hammer Museum's Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood. The UCLA restoration does full justice to one of the most exquisite color films ever made.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Jack Cardiff, the British cinematographer who won an Academy Award for his stunning color work on the 1947 drama "Black Narcissus" and later became an Oscar-nominated director, has died. He was 94. Cardiff, who as a cinematographer was known as a pioneer of Technicolor and a "master of light," died Wednesday of age-related causes at his home in Ely, England, said Craig McCall, the producer and director of a pending documentary on Cardiff. "Jack was a great ambassador to film," McCall said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2005 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
JACK CARDIFF, one of the cinema's most treasured cinematographers, will be making two rare appearances in Los Angeles to discuss his work on the classic Technicolor films "Black Narcissus" (1947), for which he won the Academy Award, and 1951's "The African Queen." On Thursday, Cardiff, 91, will appear at the academy's Samuel Goldwyn Theater for a screening of the new digital restoration of "Black Narcissus" by Granada International and the British Film Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2001 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a regular contributor to Calendar
"You have to look hard at the things you love. I looked hard at paintings, and I learned about light." Those simple sentences perfectly encapsulate the long life's work of Jack Cardiff, widely regarded as one of the world's great cinematographers. At 86, with more than 100 films to his credit, the English-born Cardiff will receive an honorary Oscar at the Academy Awards ceremony next Sunday--the first honorary Oscar ever given primarily for achievements in cinematography. (In 1952, George A.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Since movies about treasure hunts are usually so crass and contrived, "Million Dollar Mystery" (citywide) is a welcome surprise. Blithe, fast and full of belly laughs, it uses the slenderest of plots as a showcase for an array of young, talented comedians, most of then new to the screen. Unlike most of its predecessors, it sees the humor in greed instead of bearing down on it with a heavy, hypocritical hand.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2007 | KEVIN CRUST
We're so accustomed to the experience of entering a dark room to watch the flicker of light on a wall, it's easy to forget how inherently surreal it is. And when the images themselves are surreal, the effect can be mind-blowing. (No, that's not an endorsement of controlled substances.) This weekend, LACMA wraps the cinema component of its Dali-inspired series with a trio of "Surrealist Favorites From Hollywood" that work some strangely inspired elements into classical mid-20th century style.
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