Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJack Catain
IN THE NEWS

Jack Catain

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1986 | TED ROHRLICH, Times Staff Writer
Jack Catain is a 56-year-old San Fernando Valley businessman whose name has a peculiar effect on some people. They whisper when they say it. "Jack is organized, " whispered H. Daniel Whitman, a West Hollywood restaurateur. "Jack is very heavy." Whitman's description, secretly recorded by federal law enforcement officers three years ago, jibes with the views of many of the officers themselves. They have long speculated in and out of court that Jack M. Catain Jr. is a major organized crime figure, with links to the highest levels of Mafia "families" in Chicago and Philadelphia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1987 | ANDREW C. REVKIN, Times Staff Writer
Jack Catain, a reputed organized-crime figure who had evaded prosecution for a decade until a conviction last November on federal racketeering charges, died Saturday morning at Encino Hospital, a hospital nursing supervisor said. The 56-year-old Tarzana resident had been hospitalized for heart surgery, his lawyer, James A. Twitty, said. He was free on bail while awaiting sentencing after his Nov. 7 conviction on charges of conspiring to sell part of a $3.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1987 | ANDREW C. REVKIN, Times Staff Writer
Jack Catain, a reputed organized-crime figure who had evaded prosecution for a decade until a conviction last November on federal racketeering charges, died Saturday morning at Encino Hospital, a hospital nursing supervisor said. The 56-year-old Tarzana resident had been hospitalized for heart surgery, his lawyer, James A. Twitty, said. He was free on bail while awaiting sentencing after his Nov. 7 conviction on charges of conspiring to sell part of a $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1986 | TED ROHRLICH, Times Staff Writer
Jack Catain is a 56-year-old San Fernando Valley businessman whose name has a peculiar effect on some people. They whisper when they say it. "Jack is organized, " whispered H. Daniel Whitman, a West Hollywood restaurateur. "Jack is very heavy." Whitman's description, secretly recorded by federal law enforcement officers three years ago, jibes with the views of many of the officers themselves. They have long speculated in and out of court that Jack M. Catain Jr. is a major organized crime figure, with links to the highest levels of Mafia "families" in Chicago and Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 18, 1987
Sentencing for Tarzana businessman and reputed organized-crime figure Jack Catain was postponed for six months after a Los Angeles federal court judge learned that the 55-year-old Catain, free on bail since his counterfeiting conviction in November, underwent open heart surgery. U.S. District Judge William P. Gray set a new sentencing date of Aug. 17.
NEWS
September 21, 1985 | From United Press International
A federal appeals court Friday ordered a new trial for H. Daniel Whitman, a former West Hollywood restaurateur convicted of conspiring to kill a government witness in the probe of possible ticket scalping at the 1980 Super Bowl. Whitman, 54, was sentenced to eight years in prison after he was convicted in Los Angeles federal court in May, 1984, of conspiracy to murder and tampering with and retaliating against the witness, Raymond Cohen, who was not injured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1987
Sentencing for Tarzana businessman and reputed organized-crime figure Jack Catain has been postponed for six months after a Los Angeles federal court judge learned that the 55-year-old Catain, free on bail since his counterfeiting conviction last November, underwent open heart surgery. U. S. District Judge William P. Gray on Tuesday set a new sentencing date of Aug. 17 for Catain, convicted Nov. 7 of conspiring to sell part of a $3.3-million cache of counterfeit $100 bills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1988
A Los Angeles federal judge refused Monday to disqualify himself from the racketeering trial of former carpet cleaning whiz kid Barry Minkow, rejecting a defense attorney's claim that he had been prejudiced by confidential information. U.S. District Judge Dickran Tevrizian refused to step down from the case, which stems from the July, 1987, collapse of Reseda-based ZZZZ Best, the firm Minkow founded in his parents' garage when he was 15 and built into a hot Wall Street property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1988
Concluding his first week of testimony at his fraud trial in federal court in Los Angeles on Friday, Barry Minkow described how, strapped for cash, he increasingly turned to individuals connected with organized crime for loans to keep his ZZZZ Best carpet cleaning company afloat. Minkow, 22, said the late reputed mobster Jack Catain promised him $75,000 in a bail-out loan, then opened an office across from his in Reseda.
NEWS
November 7, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
A reputed mobster was convicted today in Los Angeles of taking part in a scheme to distribute part of a $3.5-million cache of counterfeit $100 bills. Jack Catain Jr., 56, a Tarzana businessman, was found guilty of conspiring to transfer counterfeit on May 7, 1985, and the transfer of $50,000 in counterfeit $100 bills on April 18. The jury acquitted Catain on a third charge, the passage of two $100 notes on May 3.
NEWS
July 19, 1986
Former West Hollywood restaurateur H. Daniel Whitman was convicted Friday--for the second time--of conspiring to kill a witness in a federal ticket-scalping investigation. A federal court jury in Los Angeles found Whitman, 55, guilty of conspiracy to commit murder, witness-tampering, retaliating against a federal witness and conspiracy to deprive a witness of his civil rights. U.S. District Judge Francis C. Whelan set sentencing for Aug. 12, and permitted Whitman to remain free on bail.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|