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Jack Charlton

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SPORTS
June 21, 1990 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is one of the most memorable and, indeed, poignant photographs in World Cup history. It shows a player on his knees on the turf, his face buried in his hands. The emotion it conveys is almost palpable. The shot was taken at Wembley Stadium in London on the afternoon of July 30, 1966, the day that England defeated West Germany, 4-2, in overtime, to win the World Cup. The player in the picture is Jack Charlton.
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SPORTS
July 5, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Ireland's coach, Jack Charlton, despite ending his post-game news conference by saying, "See you. . . sometime," will stay on through the next European championships, which are two years away. Charlton, 59, has no formal contract with the Football Assn. of Ireland. However, he seems inclined to remain coach.
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SPORTS
July 2, 1994 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is an Englishman who is revered in Ireland. That happens once every couple of centuries. His name is Jack Charlton, and his heritage is overlooked by the faithful in Dublin and Shannon and Cork and Tipperary because he has brought new life to the passion of Ireland. He is coach of the Irish national soccer team, and he is good at it. How good? Before he took over in 1986, Ireland had never been in a World Cup tournament. Now, it has made its second consecutive advancement to the second round.
SPORTS
July 2, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Ireland Coach Jack Charlton, who was suspended from his team's game against Norway because of "ungentlemanly conduct" in the previous game, is still unapologetic over his actions. "I still don't know what I did," said Charlton, who grabbed the coat lapels of a FIFA official who tried to prevent him from sending two substitutes onto the field before the official recorded their arrivals. "But rules are rules. There are so many, you don't know which ones you're breaking."
SPORTS
July 5, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Ireland's coach, Jack Charlton, despite ending his post-game news conference by saying, "See you. . . sometime," will stay on through the next European championships, which are two years away. Charlton, 59, has no formal contract with the Football Assn. of Ireland. However, he seems inclined to remain coach.
SPORTS
July 2, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Ireland Coach Jack Charlton, who was suspended from his team's game against Norway because of "ungentlemanly conduct" in the previous game, is still unapologetic over his actions. "I still don't know what I did," said Charlton, who grabbed the coat lapels of a FIFA official who tried to prevent him from sending two substitutes onto the field before the official recorded their arrivals. "But rules are rules. There are so many, you don't know which ones you're breaking."
SPORTS
July 2, 1994 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is an Englishman who is revered in Ireland. That happens once every couple of centuries. His name is Jack Charlton, and his heritage is overlooked by the faithful in Dublin and Shannon and Cork and Tipperary because he has brought new life to the passion of Ireland. He is coach of the Irish national soccer team, and he is good at it. How good? Before he took over in 1986, Ireland had never been in a World Cup tournament. Now, it has made its second consecutive advancement to the second round.
SPORTS
June 21, 1990 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is one of the most memorable and, indeed, poignant photographs in World Cup history. It shows a player on his knees on the turf, his face buried in his hands. The emotion it conveys is almost palpable. The shot was taken at Wembley Stadium in London on the afternoon of July 30, 1966, the day that England defeated West Germany, 4-2, in overtime, to win the World Cup. The player in the picture is Jack Charlton.
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