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Jack Davis

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2012 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
U.S. teammates Jack Davis and Harrison Dillard were locked in a close race in the final of the 110-meter hurdles at the Helsinki Olympics in July 1952 when Davis, who was barely ahead, banged into the ninth barrier and lost his slim lead. At the finish line, the sprinters were clocked at an identical 13.7 seconds, a new Olympic record. But a photo finish showed Dillard first by an eyelash. Four years later, Davis lined up in the starting blocks of the same event at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics.
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SPORTS
July 27, 2012 | BILL DWYRE
A day before the joy and celebration of Friday's ceremonies open the London Games, mourners at the San Diego Yacht Club filed past two images of history en route to paying respects to a great Olympian. Jack Davis had died. He was 81 and hale and hearty until just a month or so ago. Now, these Olympics will go on without the presence of one of the world's true Gamers. Another symbolic prop for this waterfront memorial service would have been the fishing boat Davis once owned, docked nearby.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
He bowed to six monarchs over three centuries, and lived to mourn almost all of the 5 million Britons who fought with him in the war to end all wars, from 1914 to 1918. "They shall grow not old as we that are left grow old; age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them," his voice boomed out strongly in a typical Flanders Fields observance in Belgium last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2012 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
U.S. teammates Jack Davis and Harrison Dillard were locked in a close race in the final of the 110-meter hurdles at the Helsinki Olympics in July 1952 when Davis, who was barely ahead, banged into the ninth barrier and lost his slim lead. At the finish line, the sprinters were clocked at an identical 13.7 seconds, a new Olympic record. But a photo finish showed Dillard first by an eyelash. Four years later, Davis lined up in the starting blocks of the same event at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics.
SPORTS
July 27, 2012 | BILL DWYRE
A day before the joy and celebration of Friday's ceremonies open the London Games, mourners at the San Diego Yacht Club filed past two images of history en route to paying respects to a great Olympian. Jack Davis had died. He was 81 and hale and hearty until just a month or so ago. Now, these Olympics will go on without the presence of one of the world's true Gamers. Another symbolic prop for this waterfront memorial service would have been the fishing boat Davis once owned, docked nearby.
SPORTS
March 2, 1993 | VINCE KOWALICK
Pierce 8, Santa Barbara 6--Josh Smaller ripped a three-run home run with one out in the bottom of the ninth to give Pierce (3-4, 1-2) a come-from-behind Western State Conference victory over visiting Santa Barbara. Pierce, which trailed, 6-0, after six innings, got back into the game with a four-run seventh and added another on a solo home run by Jess Anguiano. Smaller, who finished with four runs batted in, hit his first pitch out of the park to end it in the ninth.
SPORTS
June 16, 1995 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Davis holds a record for coaching 21 years of high school football in the Channel League. His career in Ventura County began in 1965 when he took over at Hueneme High after three seasons at Imperial High. In 1979 Davis became the football coach at Oxnard, where his record was 135-89-7 in 14 seasons. "One of my biggest moments as a coach was in 1969 at Hueneme," Davis said. "Hueneme won its first and only Channel League title at Santa Barbara.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2006 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
Jack Davis remembers the night he left the Republican Party over free trade: Nov. 17, 2003, after he paid $2,000 to meet Dick Cheney at the upscale Park Lane Restaurant in Buffalo, N.Y. Davis, a furnace-parts manufacturer and lifelong Republican, had hoped to convince the vice president that their party's free-trade policies hurt workers. He never got the chance. And after Davis started sharing his views with reporters at the event, he said, Cheney's staff ordered him to leave.
NEWS
May 8, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS and MARIA L. LA GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
What began as the party to end all parties has mushroomed into a scandal of sex and politics that has embarrassed the city's power structure and jeopardized the San Francisco 49ers' hopes for a pricey new football stadium complex. Every political bright light in the city turned out last weekend for the 50th birthday party honoring Jack Davis--one of the most powerful and feared operatives in San Francisco. Mayor Willie Brown, 49ers' President Carmen Policy, Dist. Atty.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2006 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
Jack Davis remembers the night he left the Republican Party over free trade: Nov. 17, 2003, after he paid $2,000 to meet Dick Cheney at the upscale Park Lane Restaurant in Buffalo, N.Y. Davis, a furnace-parts manufacturer and lifelong Republican, had hoped to convince the vice president that their party's free-trade policies hurt workers. He never got the chance. And after Davis started sharing his views with reporters at the event, he said, Cheney's staff ordered him to leave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
He bowed to six monarchs over three centuries, and lived to mourn almost all of the 5 million Britons who fought with him in the war to end all wars, from 1914 to 1918. "They shall grow not old as we that are left grow old; age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them," his voice boomed out strongly in a typical Flanders Fields observance in Belgium last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Davies, an internationally respected pioneer of modern quality winemaking and the production of sparkling wine in the Napa Valley, died Tuesday. He was 75. Davies, who with his wife, Jamie, founded Schramsberg Vineyards in 1965, died in his sleep in his Victorian vineyard home near Calistoga, Calif. He had suffered for the past year from degenerative nerve disease.
FOOD
September 17, 1997 | DAN BERGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1972, President Nixon took Schramsberg sparkling wine on his historic 1972 visit to China. Any other winemaker would have taken out newspaper ads, staged a grand dinner party or put out flowery press releases hoping for headlines. But Schramsberg's Jack Davies did nothing at all. This is just one reason that Davies, one of Napa Valley's most dynamic leaders and a man known by his fellow winemakers as the conscience of the wine industry, is practically unknown to the general public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1997
I read the story about Jack Davis ("A Political Bad Boy's Lament," June 25) with great interest. As a San Francisco resident of 12 years, I have been confounded and confused by Davis' ability to jump sides at a whim (or should I say at the chase of a dollar?). However, Davis is not the problem, he's only part of the problem. The problem is the American political system that allows such people to exist with such influence. Something is seriously wrong when the outcome of a campaign is based not on substance, but on who is either running the campaign or who raised the most money.
NEWS
June 25, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Sunday after winning a bitter electoral battle to build the San Francisco 49ers a new stadium, bad boy political consultant Jack Davis did the last thing his many enemies would expect: He went to church. And as the powerful waves of gospel music washed over him, Davis says, the most feared man in San Francisco politics thought about quitting the bare-knuckles profession he has reveled in for two decades.
NEWS
November 3, 1988 | STEVE HENSON,, Times Staff Writer
As Oxnard High lines up for its first offensive play Friday night against unbeaten Santa Barbara, Tom Sanchez will have his eyes on the tight end. The Santa Barbara assistant coach will be making certain the Yellowjackets haven't pulled the old switcheroo--slyly lining one of their speedy running backs next to a tackle, then sending him flying past the coverage for a long pass. It wouldn't surprise Sanchez if the Oxnard back even donned the uniform number of the tight end.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1997
I read the story about Jack Davis ("A Political Bad Boy's Lament," June 25) with great interest. As a San Francisco resident of 12 years, I have been confounded and confused by Davis' ability to jump sides at a whim (or should I say at the chase of a dollar?). However, Davis is not the problem, he's only part of the problem. The problem is the American political system that allows such people to exist with such influence. Something is seriously wrong when the outcome of a campaign is based not on substance, but on who is either running the campaign or who raised the most money.
NEWS
May 8, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS and MARIA L. LA GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
What began as the party to end all parties has mushroomed into a scandal of sex and politics that has embarrassed the city's power structure and jeopardized the San Francisco 49ers' hopes for a pricey new football stadium complex. Every political bright light in the city turned out last weekend for the 50th birthday party honoring Jack Davis--one of the most powerful and feared operatives in San Francisco. Mayor Willie Brown, 49ers' President Carmen Policy, Dist. Atty.
SPORTS
June 16, 1995 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Davis holds a record for coaching 21 years of high school football in the Channel League. His career in Ventura County began in 1965 when he took over at Hueneme High after three seasons at Imperial High. In 1979 Davis became the football coach at Oxnard, where his record was 135-89-7 in 14 seasons. "One of my biggest moments as a coach was in 1969 at Hueneme," Davis said. "Hueneme won its first and only Channel League title at Santa Barbara.
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