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Jack Dejohnette

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN
"There's a constant underpinning spirit that goes through whatever I do," said Jack DeJohnette, the veteran drummer whose debut Blue Note album, "Earth Walk," features his Special Edition band. "I'm just hoping people come to the music openly, without preconceived notions. We're offering another aspect of spontaneous improvisation," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2008 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
There was often a painterly aspect to Wednesday's performance by Keith Jarrett, Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette at UCLA's Royce Hall. Painterly, that is, in the sense that the trio's improvisations sometimes revealed the spontaneous musical brush strokes that went into its making -- great Jackson Pollock-like gobs of colorful sound, the sudden glow of lush, Impressionistic harmonies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
When intelligent, sensitive, forward-looking musicians like drummer Jack DeJohnette, guitarist Pat Metheny and pianist Herbie Hancock gather on acoustic and electronic instruments, we expect a lot, and, happily, here we get it.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2008 | Charles J. Gans, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- The chemistry felt special right from the start of the January 1983 recording session when pianist Keith Jarrett, bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Jack DeJohnette began playing "The Masquerade Is Over," a standard covered by singers from Billie Holiday to Stevie Wonder.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1997 | Don Heckman
Is Jack DeJohnette just too versatile for his own good? It sometimes seems that way for an artist whose restless forays into an enormously wide array of music underscore his refusal to be pigeon-holed or over-categorized. "Oneness," not unlike a previous album, "Dancing With Nature Spirits," is DeJohnette on yet another surprise journey--a tempestuous trip through frontiers of percussive improvisation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jack DeJohnette generally is regarded as one of the finest living jazz drummers, a limber musical thinker and technical dynamo, one who challenges tradition by pushing outward while digging in. His resume bubbles over with notable gigs, beginning with work in Charles Lloyd's popular '60s group--which also featured a young Keith Jarrett--and then in an early group in Miles Davis' electric era. These days, DeJohnette has gained considerable attention for being one-third of a group.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Who gets to play most of the solos when the drummer is the leader of the band? Make a wild guess. But when the drummer is as talented as Jack DeJohnette, it's not necessarily a bad thing for drumming to be at the center. And, in the opening set of a five-night run at Catalina Bar & Grill on Wednesday night, DeJohnette used his position to trigger a set of performances that generated repeated cheers from the packed audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Drummer Jack DeJohnette has always shown a talent for assembling great bands. But this time, he's outdone himself. When DeJohnette appears tonight at the Orange County Performing Arts Center and Saturday as part of the Playboy Jazz Festival at the Hollywood Bowl, he will be in the company of keyboardist Herbie Hancock, guitarist Pat Metheny and bassist Dave Holland, a formidable quartet consisting of some of the most important names to emerge from the jazz world in the last 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2008 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
There was often a painterly aspect to Wednesday's performance by Keith Jarrett, Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette at UCLA's Royce Hall. Painterly, that is, in the sense that the trio's improvisations sometimes revealed the spontaneous musical brush strokes that went into its making -- great Jackson Pollock-like gobs of colorful sound, the sudden glow of lush, Impressionistic harmonies.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1995 | Zan Stewart
Drummer-pianist-composer DeJohnette, continuing his series of eclectic "Special Edition" recordings, has assembled all the ingredients here for a first-class album. But even staunch fans of the leader's non-traditional approach may be put off by the unevenness of the album's loosely structured settings, which are basically vehicles designed for spontaneous group interplay. Surely, there are dazzling atmospheric moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
"RENAISSANCE man" may be an overused term, but it's the first thought that comes to mind while talking with drummer Jack DeJohnette, a musician whose skills and interests stretch easily across the gamut of contemporary music. You may have seen him with Keith Jarrett and Gary Peacock, adding buoyant layers of percussive sound to their inventive cruises across the Great American Songbook.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1998 | Don Heckman
The use of the word "standard" to describe the lexicon of songs written in the first half of the century by writers such as Cole Porter, Jerome Kern, George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Rodgers & Hart and others has a dual purpose. It reflects, first of all, that this material has become a part of the standard repertoire. Less obviously, it defines a collection of music that has become the standard against which to measure the work of different performers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Who gets to play most of the solos when the drummer is the leader of the band? Make a wild guess. But when the drummer is as talented as Jack DeJohnette, it's not necessarily a bad thing for drumming to be at the center. And, in the opening set of a five-night run at Catalina Bar & Grill on Wednesday night, DeJohnette used his position to trigger a set of performances that generated repeated cheers from the packed audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1997 | Don Heckman
Is Jack DeJohnette just too versatile for his own good? It sometimes seems that way for an artist whose restless forays into an enormously wide array of music underscore his refusal to be pigeon-holed or over-categorized. "Oneness," not unlike a previous album, "Dancing With Nature Spirits," is DeJohnette on yet another surprise journey--a tempestuous trip through frontiers of percussive improvisation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jack DeJohnette generally is regarded as one of the finest living jazz drummers, a limber musical thinker and technical dynamo, one who challenges tradition by pushing outward while digging in. His resume bubbles over with notable gigs, beginning with work in Charles Lloyd's popular '60s group--which also featured a young Keith Jarrett--and then in an early group in Miles Davis' electric era. These days, DeJohnette has gained considerable attention for being one-third of a group.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1995 | Zan Stewart
Drummer-pianist-composer DeJohnette, continuing his series of eclectic "Special Edition" recordings, has assembled all the ingredients here for a first-class album. But even staunch fans of the leader's non-traditional approach may be put off by the unevenness of the album's loosely structured settings, which are basically vehicles designed for spontaneous group interplay. Surely, there are dazzling atmospheric moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
"RENAISSANCE man" may be an overused term, but it's the first thought that comes to mind while talking with drummer Jack DeJohnette, a musician whose skills and interests stretch easily across the gamut of contemporary music. You may have seen him with Keith Jarrett and Gary Peacock, adding buoyant layers of percussive sound to their inventive cruises across the Great American Songbook.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN
"There's a constant underpinning spirit that goes through whatever I do," said Jack DeJohnette, the veteran drummer whose debut Blue Note album, "Earth Walk," features his Special Edition band. "I'm just hoping people come to the music openly, without preconceived notions. We're offering another aspect of spontaneous improvisation," he said.
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