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Jack Dempsey

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April 23, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He looks at us through mists of time, from faded, crinkled 19th-Century photographs. It's the jaw that draws you to him. Massive, clean, squared off. The jaw shows that here, plainly, is a man from the warriorclass. And he was. He was Jack Dempsey, decades before anyone ever heard of that other Jack Dempsey, the 1920s heavyweight champion who took his name. The original Jack Dempsey was also known as "the Nonpareil," which means without equal.
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SPORTS
September 22, 2007 | Bill Dwyre
Upon further review, something even bigger than the birth of Tom Lasorda happened on this day, 80 years ago. History should label Sept. 22, 1927, as a day of fantasy and fisticuffs. While Lasorda was emerging into a world that he would soon see only in shades of Dodger blue, a famous boxer was losing a match that would make him even more famous and beloved than if he had won.
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SPORTS
August 9, 1987 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Driving north on a farm-country highway across the cattle and alfalfa country of southern Colorado's flatlands, you catch only a fleeting glimpse of the little green sign. "Manassa," it says, and an arrow points down a two-lane road to the east. "Manassa," you think, driving on. "Manassa, Manassa . . . Manassa! Of course--Jack Dempsey, 'The Manassa Mauler.'
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2006 | Gordon Marino, Special to The Times
GENE TUNNEY won the heavyweight title from Jack Dempsey in 1926. At the time, Dempsey was the most popular athlete on the planet and widely considered unbeatable. Tunney triumphed in their rematch, which took place in Chicago in front of 144,000 spectators a year later. He defended the title once more in 1928 against Tom Heeney, then hung up his gloves with an astonishing record of 58 wins and one defeat. Tunney's only loss occurred against the windmill fists of the legendary Harry Greb in 1922.
SPORTS
February 5, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Decades later, the principals were in general agreement as to how it all came about, how a little Montana cattle, sheep and oil town came to be fleeced of a couple of hundred thousand dollars by a rascal named Jack (Doc) Kearns. It seems that two young real estate speculators, James (Body) Johnson and his partner, Mel McCutcheon, were trying to find a way to pull Shelby real estate sales out of a serious slump.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1995 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ojai is famous for a lot of things--its healthy New Age vibes, a thriving art colony. But few people know that it was once home to a boxing camp that trained legends such as Jack Dempsey. Clarence (Pop) Soper ran the camp in Matilija Canyon for about 30 years, until his death in 1957. The camp is long gone, but it has been revived in an exhibit by the Ojai Valley Historical Society and Museum. The exhibit, located in the former St. Thomas Aquinas Church in downtown Ojai, is open from 11 a.m.
SPORTS
June 25, 1995 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One hundred years ago Saturday, in a little Colorado town he would one day make the most famous small town in America, the "Manassa Mauler" was born. Jack Dempsey became one of the most famous of all 20th Century athletes, a fighter whose bob-and-weave style and ferocity transfixed post-World War I Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2006 | Gordon Marino, Special to The Times
GENE TUNNEY won the heavyweight title from Jack Dempsey in 1926. At the time, Dempsey was the most popular athlete on the planet and widely considered unbeatable. Tunney triumphed in their rematch, which took place in Chicago in front of 144,000 spectators a year later. He defended the title once more in 1928 against Tom Heeney, then hung up his gloves with an astonishing record of 58 wins and one defeat. Tunney's only loss occurred against the windmill fists of the legendary Harry Greb in 1922.
BOOKS
November 7, 1999 | STEVEN G. KELLMAN, Steven G. Kellman is the author of "The Self-Begetting Novel" and co-editor of "Leslie Fiedler and American Culture." He is an Ashbel Smith Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Texas at San Antonio
"Ican lick any son of a bitch in the house," gloated John L. Sullivan, America's last bare-knuckles champion. No other athlete can match the barroom boast of a heavyweight boxer. Success in football, hockey or shotput certainly demands pluck, luck and talent but, lacking Sullivan's primitive proof of elemental mastery over another human being in one-on-one combat, a star in any sport other than boxing seems a mere technician.
SPORTS
July 2, 1991 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventy years ago today, a prizefight between a western mining camp saloon fighter and a French war hero provided boxing's first million-dollar fight. Million-dollar matches today go pretty much unnoticed. Some give Mike Tyson and Evander Holyfield, if they fight, a chance to generate $100 million. When Tyson and Razor Ruddock fought at the Mirage in Las Vegas Friday night, the live gate was $6.2 million.
SPORTS
November 27, 2006 | Jerry Crowe, Times Staff Writer
One of boxing's rarest collectibles, or so Gloria Haley would have you believe, sits in the cluttered, darkened living room of her Beverly Hills home. A septuagenarian, she cares little for the sweet science. "I can't stand it," Haley says of boxing. "It's barbaric." She is the daughter of the late actor Jack Haley, who was the Tin Man in "The Wizard of Oz." Her brother was the late Jack Haley Jr.
SPORTS
May 18, 2000 | EARL GUSTKEY
Title: "A Flame of Pure Fire: Jack Dempsey and the Roaring '20s." Author: Roger Kahn. Price: $28. When Jack Dempsey died at 87 in 1983, he took with him an era of American history. He'd begun his life as a Colorado/Utah mining camp hobo, roustabout, miner, cowboy and whorehouse bouncer. Within a decade, he was the most electrifying sports figure in America.
BOOKS
November 7, 1999 | STEVEN G. KELLMAN, Steven G. Kellman is the author of "The Self-Begetting Novel" and co-editor of "Leslie Fiedler and American Culture." He is an Ashbel Smith Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Texas at San Antonio
"Ican lick any son of a bitch in the house," gloated John L. Sullivan, America's last bare-knuckles champion. No other athlete can match the barroom boast of a heavyweight boxer. Success in football, hockey or shotput certainly demands pluck, luck and talent but, lacking Sullivan's primitive proof of elemental mastery over another human being in one-on-one combat, a star in any sport other than boxing seems a mere technician.
SPORTS
September 14, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everyone figured it would be an entertaining fight--two heavyweights, both in their prime, both with go-for-broke, end-it-early styles. But no one was prepared for what happened. Seventy-six years ago today, heavyweight champion Jack Dempsey and Argentine challenger Luis Angel Firpo produced a boxing classic, one that writer Frank Menke described 20 years later as, "The fight of all the ages."
SPORTS
May 31, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only Jim Murray could get it right. When former heavyweight champ Jack Dempsey died at 87, The Times columnist was moved to write: "Whenever I hear the name Dempsey I think of train whistles on a hot summer night on the prairie. I think of a tinkling piano coming out of a kerosene-lit saloon in a mining camp. I think of an America that was one big roaring camp of miners, drifters, bunkhouse hands, con men, hard cases, men who lived by their fists and their shooting irons and the cards they drew.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1995 | JOHN DART
The Rev. James Whitcomb Brougher Sr., a prominent Los Angeles pastor from 1910 to 1926, and humorist-actor Will Rogers were "joshing" friends even after the Baptist preacher left to pastor a Boston church. Rogers, who died in a 1935 plane crash, said in a speech at Brougher's Tremont Temple in Boston that he had just written his epitaph (the classic phrase still quoted): "I have joked about everybody, but I never met a man in my life I did not like."
SPORTS
June 17, 1989
It's ironic how so few words can sum up such a great career. Babe Ruth. Lou Gehrig. Red Grange. Jack Dempsey. Muhammad Ali. Jesse Owens. Jim Thorpe. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. JEFFREY REINER Los Angeles
SPORTS
June 25, 1995 | EARL GUSTKEY
In the alfalfa-and-potatoes country of southern Colorado, the folks in Manassa--pop. 1,000--threw a big birthday Saturday. It was for a guy most of them never met. Jack Dempsey, who died in 1983, was born here a century ago, in a two-bedroom log house that today is the Jack Dempsey Museum, in Jack Dempsey Park. The house is now open six days a week, spring through summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1995 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ojai is famous for a lot of things--its healthy New Age vibes, a thriving art colony. But few people know that it was once home to a boxing camp that trained legends such as Jack Dempsey. Clarence (Pop) Soper ran the camp in Matilija Canyon for about 30 years, until his death in 1957. The camp is long gone, but it has been revived in an exhibit by the Ojai Valley Historical Society and Museum. The exhibit, located in the former St. Thomas Aquinas Church in downtown Ojai, is open from 11 a.m.
SPORTS
June 25, 1995 | EARL GUSTKEY
In the alfalfa-and-potatoes country of southern Colorado, the folks in Manassa--pop. 1,000--threw a big birthday Saturday. It was for a guy most of them never met. Jack Dempsey, who died in 1983, was born here a century ago, in a two-bedroom log house that today is the Jack Dempsey Museum, in Jack Dempsey Park. The house is now open six days a week, spring through summer.
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