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Jack Denton

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July 6, 2007 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
BY now, most everybody knows that young Jack Denton is back in this wreck of a town to do his late father's work. They know they can find him sleeping upstairs in his father's old law office, which, after Hurricane Katrina, doubles as his apartment. They know they can find him with clients and colleagues down at Mary Mahoney's Old French House Restaurant -- his dad's old haunt, flooded badly, but open again for business. The green-jacketed waiters there call him "Mr. Denton."
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July 6, 2007 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
BY now, most everybody knows that young Jack Denton is back in this wreck of a town to do his late father's work. They know they can find him sleeping upstairs in his father's old law office, which, after Hurricane Katrina, doubles as his apartment. They know they can find him with clients and colleagues down at Mary Mahoney's Old French House Restaurant -- his dad's old haunt, flooded badly, but open again for business. The green-jacketed waiters there call him "Mr. Denton."
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July 7, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Two Mississippi attorneys who won a punitive damages verdict against State Farm Fire & Casualty Co. over destruction from Hurricane Katrina said Friday that they had settled other pending cases. Biloxi attorney Jack Denton said he and attorney William C. Walker Jr. settled 20 State Farm cases Friday. Two of the lawsuits were scheduled for trial this month in federal court. Terms of the settlements are confidential. "We finally got a little relief," Denton told the Sun Herald newspaper.
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November 30, 2007 | Richard Fausset and Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writers
He is a legendary trial lawyer, and one of the richest men in Mississippi. His name graces the music building at his alma mater, Ole Miss. He is the brother-in-law of Republican Sen. Trent Lott, and a friend of the Democratic state attorney general. Attorney Richard F. "Dickie" Scruggs once vowed to use his expertise, stature and money to fight the insurance industry's alleged mishandling of homeowners' claims after Hurricane Katrina. But now he may be fighting for his freedom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1987 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
Doan Lap, a Vietnamese refugee with three children and a high-pressure job at an American bank, found life in the United States to be anything but easy. After escaping from war-torn Saigon in 1975, he worried about mastering English and American customs, about his job as a bank officer and about his two sons turning to gang life. Two years ago, Lap said, things got so bad that his doctor told him he ought to see a psychiatrist because he worried too much.
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