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Jack Dymond

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Jack R. Dymond, 64, a retired Oregon State University professor and an oceanographer who was the first to explore the bottom of Crater Lake in Oregon, drowned Sept. 20 while fishing in Oregon's Rogue River. In 1977, Dymond was a lead investigator on a research cruise that made an important discovery at the Galapagos Rift on the ocean floor west of Ecuador. He and other scientists were the first to spot hydrothermal vents, where warm, mineral-rich fluids spew from beneath the sea floor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Jack R. Dymond, 64, a retired Oregon State University professor and an oceanographer who was the first to explore the bottom of Crater Lake in Oregon, drowned Sept. 20 while fishing in Oregon's Rogue River. In 1977, Dymond was a lead investigator on a research cruise that made an important discovery at the Galapagos Rift on the ocean floor west of Ecuador. He and other scientists were the first to spot hydrothermal vents, where warm, mineral-rich fluids spew from beneath the sea floor.
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NEWS
August 5, 1988 | United Press International
Calling the view "absolutely beautiful," a scientist took the one-man mini-sub Deep Rover into the clear blue waters of Crater Lake on its first test dive Thursday. Oregon State University researcher Jack Dymond was at the controls as the million-dollar craft dove 200 feet in a shallow area of the lake to study a dacite dome, a type of lava dome the U.S. Geological Survey wanted explored, said Jack Thompson, chief ranger of the national park.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | United Press International
Calling the view "absolutely beautiful," a scientist took the one-man mini-sub Deep Rover into the clear blue waters of Crater Lake on its first test dive Thursday. Oregon State University researcher Jack Dymond was at the controls as the million-dollar craft dove 200 feet in a shallow area of the lake to study a dacite dome, a type of lava dome the U.S. Geological Survey wanted explored, said Jack Thompson, chief ranger of the national park.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | Associated Press
Scientists didn't find the hot springs they were seeking on the floor of Crater Lake, but a park official said the 17 dives in a one-man submergible this month yielded valuable scientific information. Oregon State University oceanographer Jack Dymond made the final dive in the Deep Rover on Tuesday, said Peter Thompson, chief ranger at Crater Lake National Park. The dives began Aug.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | JEFF BARNARD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On the bookcase behind biologist Jim Milestone's desk at Crater Lake National Park is a reminder that the National Park Service is "gravely concerned" about geothermal development just outside the park. The park service was so concerned that drilling for heat left by a volcano might rob the lake of clarity that it paid more than $600,000 for a series of dives to look for hot springs. It also focused attention on deep lakes, long the neglected stepchildren of oceanography.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1988 | JOSEPH E. BROWN, Brown, a free-lance writer based in San Diego, is the former editor of Oceans magazine.
Oregon's deep and incredibly blue Crater Lake is more than 100 miles from the Pacific Ocean. One wouldn't think of this pristine, wooded mountain resource, set aside as a national park in 1902, as a place that would intrigue a seasoned oceanographer like Jack Dymond of Oregon State University. Dymond is far more accustomed to exploring the depths of the sea, as he was doing 8,000 feet down near the Galapagos Islands in 1977.
NEWS
August 8, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
As a high-tech explorer begins rising through 1,500 feet of frigid water in this volcanic lake, total darkness gives way to an eerie gray glow above him. It is the summer sunlight. At 1,200 feet--about as deep as the Empire State Building is tall--the sun's rays still penetrate the dazzlingly clear waters of the nation's deepest lake.
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