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Jack Elliott

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2001
A memorial service for Jack Elliott, musical director of the Henry Mancini Institute and a noted composer for television and films, will be held at 6 tonight at CBS Television Studios, Stage 36, 7800 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles. Elliott died Saturday of a brain tumor. He was 74. He is survived by his wife, Bobbi; two sons, Alan and Jon; a daughter, Joanna; and a sister, Paula Homonoff of Framingham, Mass.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Michael Stillman, 87, a founder of Monitor Records, an eclectic music label that featured everything from Russian classical music to Polynesian hulas, died April 15 at his home in Somers, N.Y. Born in Saratov, Russia, Stillman moved with his family to New York City when he was a child. He graduated from New York University and served in the Army as a clerk and typist during World War II.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Mancini Musicale at Paramount Studios on Saturday night was planned as the climactic event for the Henry Mancini Institute's fifth anniversary season. With scheduled performances by Dianne Reeves, Herbie Hancock, Christian McBride and the institute musicians, as well as the presentation of an award to Quincy Jones, the evening was meant to be a colorful, celebratory experience. That's the way it wound up, as well, but not quite as originally planned.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The sixth season of the Henry Mancini Institute summer concert programs opened Friday night with a tribute to the organization's founder, Jack Elliott. It was an appropriate way to kick off a monthlong sequence of seminars, master classes, private study and free concerts for the program's 84 scholarship musicians from 62 U.S. cities and 15 countries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Elliott, arranger, composer and conductor for scores of hit television shows and movies, died Saturday of a brain tumor at UCLA Medical Center. He was 74. The tumor was diagnosed just three weeks ago as Elliott worked as musical director of the Henry Mancini Institute, which brings gifted young musicians from throughout the world to Los Angeles for a summer training program, his son said. Born Irwin Elliott Zucker in Hartford, Conn.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The sixth season of the Henry Mancini Institute summer concert programs opened Friday night with a tribute to the organization's founder, Jack Elliott. It was an appropriate way to kick off a monthlong sequence of seminars, master classes, private study and free concerts for the program's 84 scholarship musicians from 62 U.S. cities and 15 countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1996 | ROBERT HILBURN
If you could judge singers by their taste in songs, Jack Elliott would be among the most acclaimed figures of the modern pop era. In this retrospective alone, he offers up such folk and country gems as Kris Kristofferson's "Me and Bobby McGee," Tim Hardin's "Reason to Believe" and Bob Dylan's "I'll Be Your Baby Tonight." However, Elliott's versions of most of these songs are far from definitive. In places, they're almost amateurish--in the kindest sense of the word.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1998 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They don't call Jack Elliott "Ramblin' Jack" for nothing. For most of his sixtysomething years the open road has been his address. But Sunday night, at the Ventura Theatre, Elliott will sit still long enough to play selections from his vast repertoire of country-flavored folk tunes. Opening will be old pal Bob Jones, who more than 20 years ago booked Elliott at the now-defunct Back Door, a club that was a few blocks from the theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2000 | SUSAN KING, Susan King is a Times staff writer
Legendary folk singer and storyteller extraordinaire Ramblin' Jack Elliott is never at a loss for words. In fact, in the award-winning documentary "The Ballad of Ramblin' Jack," Elliott's longtime friend Kris Kristofferson jokes that the folkie got his nickname not because of his nomadic wanderings, but from his rambling conversations.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Elliott Charles Adnopoz, the oldest son of Flossie and Dr. Abraham Adnopoz of Brooklyn, N.Y., dreamed the most powerful dream. Living on prosaic Linden Boulevard, young Elliott didn't merely wish he was a riding, roping, don't-fence-me-in cowboy, he convinced himself he actually was. With a vision that uncompromising, it was only a matter of time until reality caught up and made the dream flesh.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2001
A memorial service for Jack Elliott, musical director of the Henry Mancini Institute and a noted composer for television and films, will be held at 6 tonight at CBS Television Studios, Stage 36, 7800 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles. Elliott died Saturday of a brain tumor. He was 74. He is survived by his wife, Bobbi; two sons, Alan and Jon; a daughter, Joanna; and a sister, Paula Homonoff of Framingham, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Mancini Musicale at Paramount Studios on Saturday night was planned as the climactic event for the Henry Mancini Institute's fifth anniversary season. With scheduled performances by Dianne Reeves, Herbie Hancock, Christian McBride and the institute musicians, as well as the presentation of an award to Quincy Jones, the evening was meant to be a colorful, celebratory experience. That's the way it wound up, as well, but not quite as originally planned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Elliott, arranger, composer and conductor for scores of hit television shows and movies, died Saturday of a brain tumor at UCLA Medical Center. He was 74. The tumor was diagnosed just three weeks ago as Elliott worked as musical director of the Henry Mancini Institute, which brings gifted young musicians from throughout the world to Los Angeles for a summer training program, his son said. Born Irwin Elliott Zucker in Hartford, Conn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2000 | SUSAN KING, Susan King is a Times staff writer
Legendary folk singer and storyteller extraordinaire Ramblin' Jack Elliott is never at a loss for words. In fact, in the award-winning documentary "The Ballad of Ramblin' Jack," Elliott's longtime friend Kris Kristofferson jokes that the folkie got his nickname not because of his nomadic wanderings, but from his rambling conversations.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Elliott Charles Adnopoz, the oldest son of Flossie and Dr. Abraham Adnopoz of Brooklyn, N.Y., dreamed the most powerful dream. Living on prosaic Linden Boulevard, young Elliott didn't merely wish he was a riding, roping, don't-fence-me-in cowboy, he convinced himself he actually was. With a vision that uncompromising, it was only a matter of time until reality caught up and made the dream flesh.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1998 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Ramblin' Jack Elliott has pretty good taste in musical pals. In the '50s, the Brooklyn-born troubadour traveled with Woody Guthrie. In the '60s and '70s, he hung around with Bob Dylan. So when you see the 67-year-old billed with three generation-younger musicians on a tour billed as Monsters of Folk, you know that the others are probably no slouches. Not that the crowds packing McCabe's on Friday for two sets by the foursome had to be sold on any of them.
NEWS
May 15, 1989 | KEVIN ALLMAN
It was the everyday, garden-variety birthday party: a buffet dinner followed by a group sing-along. But there were a few differences. The guest of honor wasn't there. The birthday boy is composer Irving Berlin, who had celebrated his 101st birthday days before at his home in New York. The party and buffet dinner were at the Beverly Hills home of Ginny and Henry Mancini. And who could help but be intimidated at a sing-along with Mel Torme sitting 10 feet away on the sofa? Saturday night was the sixth time the Mancinis have hosted the birthday party for Berlin, celebrated annually by the Foundation for New American Music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
The problems involved in keeping a big band together have plagued musicians ever since the swing era ended. Where do you find jobs for 16 men? Whom do you commission to write for them and how do you pay them? Where can you travel, given the huge cost of plane fares? How do you keep the ensemble racially integrated?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1998 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They don't call Jack Elliott "Ramblin' Jack" for nothing. For most of his sixtysomething years the open road has been his address. But Sunday night, at the Ventura Theatre, Elliott will sit still long enough to play selections from his vast repertoire of country-flavored folk tunes. Opening will be old pal Bob Jones, who more than 20 years ago booked Elliott at the now-defunct Back Door, a club that was a few blocks from the theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1996 | ROBERT HILBURN
If you could judge singers by their taste in songs, Jack Elliott would be among the most acclaimed figures of the modern pop era. In this retrospective alone, he offers up such folk and country gems as Kris Kristofferson's "Me and Bobby McGee," Tim Hardin's "Reason to Believe" and Bob Dylan's "I'll Be Your Baby Tonight." However, Elliott's versions of most of these songs are far from definitive. In places, they're almost amateurish--in the kindest sense of the word.
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