Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJack Elway
IN THE NEWS

Jack Elway

SPORTS
January 4, 1990 | ROBERT E. WYCOFF, From Times wire services and Robert E. Wycoff is president and chief operating officer of ARCO, and a member of the California Business Roundtable's Education Task Force.
Jack Elway, a college head coach for 17 seasons and the father of Denver Broncos quarterback John Elway, one of pro football's top quarterbacks, will coach the London team in the new International League of American Football. The league said Elway, the first head coach to be assigned to a team, will arrive in London later this month and start player tryouts. The league, with teams in eight European cities, is scheduled to begin its first season April 14.
Advertisement
SPORTS
November 30, 1989 | From Times wire services
Former Stanford and San Jose State Coach Jack Elway is among 77 people who have applied for the job as Northern Arizona's football coach, school officials said. A 12-member search committee started reviewing the applications Monday, and officials said Wednesday that a new coach could be named as early as this weekend. The vacancy occurs because Larry Kentera announced Nov. 7 that he is resigning after his fifth season.
SPORTS
June 11, 1989
Going from football coach of the Stanford Cardinal to assistant coach of the Milan Seamen sounds like quite a dropoff, but Jack Elway is treating it as a paid vacation in Italy. As an assistant to old friend Sark Arslanian, formerly the coach at Colorado State, Elway gets $4,200 a month plus expenses and a car to help coach three practices and a game each week. The 12-week season already is under way. Wrote Jake Curtis of the San Francisco Chronicle: "Among his players are a linebacker who is a dentist and a 38-year-old lineman who is a journalist.
SPORTS
December 6, 1988 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
Jack Elway, who may be better known for steering his son to Stanford than for coaching there, was fired Monday after a 5-year tenure that produced a 25-29-2 record. Elway, who had previously coached at San Jose State and Cal State Northridge, oversaw a 3-6-2 team this past season. Andy Geiger, Stanford's director of athletics, said: "I believe it is in the best interest of Stanford football to take a new direction." He said a search for a successor would begin immediately.
SPORTS
November 25, 1988 | JERRY CROWE, Times Staff Writer
Stanford enjoys a unique perspective on Saturday's battle for No. 1 between top-ranked Notre Dame and second-ranked USC. The Cardinal lost to both. In its opener Sept. 10 at Stanford, the Cardinal lost to USC, 24-20, when quarterback Rodney Peete drove the Trojans 80 yards to the game-winning touchdown in the last 3 1/2 minutes. Three weeks later, Stanford was crushed by Notre Dame, 42-14, at South Bend, Ind.
SPORTS
September 20, 1987 | Associated Press
He has lived and played in Colorado for more than four years now. But as an alumnus of Stanford and the son of current Stanford Coach Jack Elway, is there any question where John Elway's loyalties lie? Asked his preference in Saturday's Stanford-Colorado game in Boulder, the younger Elway said emphatically, "I'm 100 percent behind Stanford. I may live in the CU area, but all my loyalty goes to my father, and I hope they kick the crap out of CU."
SPORTS
October 11, 1985 | STEVE DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
The last Stanford quarterback who majored in economics is doing quite well, in football and in economics. His name is John Elway, and he earns a million dollars a year with the Denver Broncos. John Paye is the latest economics major playing quarterback for Stanford. That's where his comparisons with Elway begin. Understandably, that is where Paye wishes comparisons would end, as well.
SPORTS
July 26, 1985 | GORDON MONSON, Times Staff Writer
"All right you guys, to start off we're gonna play a game called 'Name that Tune.' If any one of you can give me the title of this song after the first few notes, you'll win $1,000. I'm serious about this. Count 'em--one thooouuussand dollars." Stanford University linebacker coach Larry Kerr peered out over the lectern at the crowd of 500 less-than-believing young football players gathered in the auditorium. "No, I really mean it.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|