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Jack F Matlock

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January 13, 1987 | United Press International
President Reagan soon will name veteran Foreign Service officer Jack F. Matlock Jr. to be the next U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union, officials said Monday. The officials said the Soviet government has notified Washington that it accepts the ambassadorial nomination of Matlock, who is fluent in Russian and formerly was deputy director of the National Security Council staff.
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August 22, 2004 | Richard Pipes, Richard Pipes is Baird professor emeritus of history at Harvard University and author, most recently, of "Vixi: The Memoirs of a Non-Belonger."
The author of this book is a retired Foreign Service officer, specializing in Soviet affairs. He holds a master's degree from Columbia in this subject and has served four tours of duty in Moscow, the last, from 1987 to 1991, as U.S. ambassador. He was thus in a unique position to observe firsthand the evolution of American-Soviet relations from intense hostility to gradual thaw, culminating in the dissolution of the Soviet Union that ended the Cold War.
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NEWS
August 3, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
In a dramatic test of new Soviet-American contacts aimed at combatting terrorism, the United States has asked the Kremlin for its help in determining the status of American and other Western hostages held by militant Muslims in Lebanon, informed sources said here Wednesday. The request, which follows the reported killing of an American hostage Monday and a threat to kill another one today, was made at a hastily called meeting Wednesday between Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end, the American who lived in the big yellow house near the Church of the Savior on the Sands could no longer walk the streets of Moscow incognito with his wife, as he loves to do. People, recognizing him, would approach and ask for an autograph or say something like, "Thank you for being here, for all you've done." They might beg a favor, like helping their mother-in-law jump the queue at the emigration line.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abruptly dropping his diplomatic reserve, outgoing U.S. Ambassador Jack F. Matlock Jr. on Wednesday attacked Congress as the source of his greatest frustrations while in Moscow, accusing lawmakers of ignoring the needs of his staff and even endangering their lives by failing to agree on how to replace the decrepit U.S. mission here.
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end, the American who lived in the big yellow house near the Church of the Savior on the Sands could no longer walk the streets of Moscow incognito with his wife, as he loves to do. People, recognizing him, would approach and ask for an autograph or say something like, "Thank you for being here, for all you've done." They might beg a favor, like helping their mother-in-law jump the queue at the emigration line.
BOOKS
August 22, 2004 | Richard Pipes, Richard Pipes is Baird professor emeritus of history at Harvard University and author, most recently, of "Vixi: The Memoirs of a Non-Belonger."
The author of this book is a retired Foreign Service officer, specializing in Soviet affairs. He holds a master's degree from Columbia in this subject and has served four tours of duty in Moscow, the last, from 1987 to 1991, as U.S. ambassador. He was thus in a unique position to observe firsthand the evolution of American-Soviet relations from intense hostility to gradual thaw, culminating in the dissolution of the Soviet Union that ended the Cold War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1996
Jack F. Matlock Jr., U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union from 1987 to 1991, will discuss recent developments in Russia at this month's Orange County Forum. Co-sponsoring the luncheon, set for 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at the Hyatt Regency Irvine, are Women in World Trade and the World Affairs Council of Orange County. The cost for the luncheon is $25 for Forum members and $35 for nonmembers. Reservations: (714) 588-9884.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1996 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO
A past U. S. ambassador to the former Soviet Union will lead a political discussion before the World Affairs Council of Ventura County on Monday. Jack F. Matlock Jr. was chief ambassador to the USSR from 1987 to 1991, a skilled diplomat who spoke Russian and many of the languages indigenous to the various Soviet republics. The discussion will begin at 6 p.m. at the Tower Club in Oxnard. For reservations, call 449-9953. Cost is $22 for nonmembers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1987 | Associated Press
President Reagan on Friday nominated Jack F. Matlock Jr., one of his top advisers on East-West affairs and a Russian language scholar, as ambassador to the Soviet Union. Matlock, 57, is a career Foreign Service officer who, until returning to the State Department late last year, was the chief Soviet specialist on the National Security Council. Matlock, whose nomination must be confirmed by the Senate, would replace Arthur A.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abruptly dropping his diplomatic reserve, outgoing U.S. Ambassador Jack F. Matlock Jr. on Wednesday attacked Congress as the source of his greatest frustrations while in Moscow, accusing lawmakers of ignoring the needs of his staff and even endangering their lives by failing to agree on how to replace the decrepit U.S. mission here.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
In a dramatic test of new Soviet-American contacts aimed at combatting terrorism, the United States has asked the Kremlin for its help in determining the status of American and other Western hostages held by militant Muslims in Lebanon, informed sources said here Wednesday. The request, which follows the reported killing of an American hostage Monday and a threat to kill another one today, was made at a hastily called meeting Wednesday between Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A.
NEWS
January 13, 1987 | United Press International
President Reagan soon will name veteran Foreign Service officer Jack F. Matlock Jr. to be the next U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union, officials said Monday. The officials said the Soviet government has notified Washington that it accepts the ambassadorial nomination of Matlock, who is fluent in Russian and formerly was deputy director of the National Security Council staff.
NEWS
April 16, 1989
The Soviet Union protested the expulsion of a Soviet trade official from the United States and suggested that it might take further action, the Tass news agency said. The Foreign Ministry issued the protest to U.S. Ambassador Jack F. Matlock Jr., describing the March 23 expulsion order against Sergei Malinin, an employee of the Soviet trade organization Amtorg, as groundless, Tass said. The news agency asserted that U.S. authorities expelled Malinin in retaliation for the expulsion by Moscow of a U.S. military attache, Lt. Col. Daniel Francis Van Gundy.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | Associated Press
The Cadillac limousine taking Secretary of State James A. Baker III to a Soviet Foreign Ministry guest house broke down a few yards short of its destination, and Baker had to walk to get there. The car usually is used by Ambassador Jack F. Matlock Jr. but was turned over to Baker for his three-day visit. Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh later jokingly offered to provide Baker with one of the Zil limousines provided to top Soviet leaders. "We'll give them a Zil," Bessmertnykh said.
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