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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2012 | John Penner
Jack Gilbert, a poet who eschewed conventions of career and writing style to develop a singular voice that combined intellectual heft with a spare specificity of language that made him among the major figures of American poetry over the last half-century, has died. He was 87. Gilbert, who was in the advanced stages of dementia, died Tuesday at a nursing home in Berkeley after developing pneumonia, said Bill Mayer, a poet and longtime friend. Calling Gilbert "America's greatest living poet," Mayer said his friend "was unique in that he was not a part of any [literary]
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2012 | John Penner
Jack Gilbert, a poet who eschewed conventions of career and writing style to develop a singular voice that combined intellectual heft with a spare specificity of language that made him among the major figures of American poetry over the last half-century, has died. He was 87. Gilbert, who was in the advanced stages of dementia, died Tuesday at a nursing home in Berkeley after developing pneumonia, said Bill Mayer, a poet and longtime friend. Calling Gilbert "America's greatest living poet," Mayer said his friend "was unique in that he was not a part of any [literary]
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By John Penner
The poet Jack Gilbert, who had been battling dementia for many years, died Tuesday in Berkeley. He was 87. Gilbert -- who was featured in Monday's L.A. Times -- had been in frail condition at a nursing home for several years before he developed pneumonia over the last couple of days, and he succumbed early this morning, said Bill Mayer, a poet and longtime friend. Mayer was among a group who kept a vigil at Gilbert's side during his final hours. Fellow Bay Area poets Larry Felson and Steven Rood were among the group, as was Louise Gregg, the sister of the poet Linda Gregg, who was closest to Gilbert and knew him almost from the beginning of his 50-year writing career.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2012 | By John Penner
The poet Jack Gilbert, who had been battling dementia for many years, died Tuesday in Berkeley. He was 87. Gilbert -- who was featured in Monday's L.A. Times -- had been in frail condition at a nursing home for several years before he developed pneumonia over the last couple of days, and he succumbed early this morning, said Bill Mayer, a poet and longtime friend. Mayer was among a group who kept a vigil at Gilbert's side during his final hours. Fellow Bay Area poets Larry Felson and Steven Rood were among the group, as was Louise Gregg, the sister of the poet Linda Gregg, who was closest to Gilbert and knew him almost from the beginning of his 50-year writing career.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2012 | By John Penner, Los Angeles Times
BERKELEY - In a spacious, humane skilled-nursing home, a man sits with his elderly neighbors arrayed in their wheelchairs as Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald sing. Several guests arrive to see the man, and after the last note of "Cheek to Cheek," one of them takes up a microphone and reads a poem. The reader, startled by a resident's pained moans of distress, stumbles over a word or two of "Looking at Pittsburgh From Paris. " He finishes, and the man brightens in his chair and points at his heart, mouthing to a visitor holding his arm, "Me?"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2005 | Elizabeth Hoover, Special to The Times
A thousand years ago when they built the gardens of Kyoto, the stones were set in the streams askew. Whoever went quickly would fall in. Thus Jack Gilbert writes in his magnificent fourth collection, "Refusing Heaven." In these elegant poems, he shows the value of patience. The reader must slow to negotiate the dense philosophical and moral issues these poems present: the nature of loss, the utility of solitude, the reconciliation of faith and suffering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2005 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
Jack Gilbert didn't graduate from high school, much less college, but these days he's the big man on campus. The self-made Oxnard millionaire has pledged the largest gift in California Lutheran University's history, a $5-million cash infusion designed to boost a building campaign at the Thousand Oaks campus. The donation adds to the more than $4 million that Gilbert, founder of the TOLD Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1994 | MARY F. POLS
Cal Lutheran University has elected 10 regents to serve on its 34-member governing Board of Regents, including two local businessmen, university officials said. Jack Gilbert of Camarillo and David Watson of Thousand Oaks were selected for three-year terms on the policy-setting board last week. The regents are chosen by representatives of the Lutheran church and a handful of students and faculty at the Thousand Oaks university. Gilbert is founder of the TOLD Corp.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1995 | JACK SEARLES
Resales of single-family homes in Ventura County declined nearly 4% in December from November, the California Assn. of Realtors reports. December's sales activity was off a steep 22% from a year earlier. And median resale prices in December were $200,650, down 2% from December, 1993. . . . Ducommun Corp., an L.A. producer of aerospace components and assemblies, acquired 3dbm Inc., a Camarillo maker of communications systems for military and commercial customers, for $5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2007 | From a Times Staff Writer
California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks announced this week that it has tallied more than $10 million in donations for capital improvement projects. "We're closing in on $11 million," said John Sladek, who was inaugurated as Cal Lutheran's sixth president last month. "We're absolutely delighted." The largest gift was $5 million from Jim Swenson, a member of the CLU board of regents, and his wife, Sue.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2012 | By John Penner, Los Angeles Times
BERKELEY - In a spacious, humane skilled-nursing home, a man sits with his elderly neighbors arrayed in their wheelchairs as Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald sing. Several guests arrive to see the man, and after the last note of "Cheek to Cheek," one of them takes up a microphone and reads a poem. The reader, startled by a resident's pained moans of distress, stumbles over a word or two of "Looking at Pittsburgh From Paris. " He finishes, and the man brightens in his chair and points at his heart, mouthing to a visitor holding his arm, "Me?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2005 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
Jack Gilbert didn't graduate from high school, much less college, but these days he's the big man on campus. The self-made Oxnard millionaire has pledged the largest gift in California Lutheran University's history, a $5-million cash infusion designed to boost a building campaign at the Thousand Oaks campus. The donation adds to the more than $4 million that Gilbert, founder of the TOLD Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2005 | Elizabeth Hoover, Special to The Times
A thousand years ago when they built the gardens of Kyoto, the stones were set in the streams askew. Whoever went quickly would fall in. Thus Jack Gilbert writes in his magnificent fourth collection, "Refusing Heaven." In these elegant poems, he shows the value of patience. The reader must slow to negotiate the dense philosophical and moral issues these poems present: the nature of loss, the utility of solitude, the reconciliation of faith and suffering.
NEWS
September 28, 1994
The Lannan Foundation has announced the 10 recipients of its 1994 Lannan Literary Awards. The annual awards are given to writers who have made significant contributions to English-language literature as well as to those with potential for outstanding future work. The recipients include four poets--Simon Armitage, Eavan Boland, Jack Gilbert and Richard Kenney; four fiction writers--Edward P.
BOOKS
May 21, 1995
PEN Center USA West, the professional writers organization, has announced its 1995 literary awards, for outstanding work last year by writers living in the West. The winners: Nonfiction: Julia Frey for "Toulouse-Lautrec: A Life" (Viking). Fiction: Robert Boswell for "Living to Be 100" (Knopf). Poetry: Jack Gilbert for "The Great Fires: Poems, 1982-1992 (Knopf.) Translation: John E. Woods for "Collected Novellas of Arno Schmidt: Collected Early Fiction, 1949-1964, Volume 1" (Dalkey Archive Press.
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