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Jack Gilford

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NEWS
June 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jack Gilford, a sad-eyed comic, dramatic actor and vaudevillian who shone in featured roles on stage, television and movies, died at his Manhattan home this morning, a spokeswoman said. He was 81. Gilford died after a long struggle with stomach cancer and had last been hospitalized two weeks ago, according to Merle Debuskey, a family friend and publicist. He was at his Greenwich Village home with his actress wife, Madeline Lee, when he died about 8 a.m., Debuskey said.
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NEWS
June 5, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Gilford, the sad-eyed tragi-comedian whose warm, puckish countenance graced stages, nightclubs and films for more than 50 years, died Monday morning. Gilford was 82 and died at his home in New York City's Greenwich Village after a long struggle with stomach cancer. He had been in the hospital until two weeks ago, said Merle Debuskey, his friend and publicist. His actress wife, Madeline Lee, was with him when he died.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1987 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Nice to see you again, Uncle Jack. It's been so long. Make some room for him by the fireside. Now, tell us some of those stories. Jack Gilford loves stories. He even has a title for what he does at the Pasadena Playhouse--"My Life in the Theatre, or How I Became an Overnight Success in 40 Years." What he does . . . well, you know Uncle Jack. He does take his time getting to the point. Gilford and that endearing face of his, combining familial warmth and coy mischief, is intact as ever.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jack Gilford, a sad-eyed comic, dramatic actor and vaudevillian who shone in featured roles on stage, television and movies, died at his Manhattan home this morning, a spokeswoman said. He was 81. Gilford died after a long struggle with stomach cancer and had last been hospitalized two weeks ago, according to Merle Debuskey, a family friend and publicist. He was at his Greenwich Village home with his actress wife, Madeline Lee, when he died about 8 a.m., Debuskey said.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Gilford, the sad-eyed tragi-comedian whose warm, puckish countenance graced stages, nightclubs and films for more than 50 years, died Monday morning. Gilford was 82 and died at his home in New York City's Greenwich Village after a long struggle with stomach cancer. He had been in the hospital until two weeks ago, said Merle Debuskey, his friend and publicist. His actress wife, Madeline Lee, was with him when he died.
NEWS
August 28, 2003 | Associated Press
The long-running Broadway revival of "Cabaret" will close Nov. 2 at Studio 54 after a nearly six-year engagement -- 2,306 performances. The Roundabout Theatre Company production currently stars Melina Kanakaredes as the English chanteuse Sally Bowles and Jon Secada as the decadent master of ceremonies. The Kander and Ebb musical opened March 19, 1998, at the Henry Miller Theatre with Alan Cumming and Natasha Richardson in the leading roles. Both won Tony Awards for their performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1987 | Leonard Klady
Hal Ashby has completed the adaptation of Tom Berger's novel "Vital Parts," another in Berger's Carl Reinhart series, which Ashby probably will direct in May with Jerome Hellman producing. Gene Hackman is tentatively set to play Reinhart, a victimized Everyman, who in this installment is down on his luck and tempted to become the first man scientifically frozen and revivified. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renee Orin, a Broadway veteran of such musicals as "Plain and Fancy" and Tennessee Williams' "Slapstick Tragedy," has died. She was 73. Orin, married for 49 years to Tony-winning Broadway composer Albert Hague, died Saturday of lymphoma at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica, according to publicist Pegge Forrest.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1985 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The great Italian director Lina Wertmuller, receiving an award at the recent Women in Film luncheon, said something so true and profound that it ought to be on every executive wall in Hollywood, right up there with "Think" and "Thank You for Not Smoking." "The idea of making movies is to make money," she said (I am paraphrasing from memory), "but let us make money with beautiful films and not beautiful money with ugly films." Well, hooray, huzzah and Amen.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1987 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Nice to see you again, Uncle Jack. It's been so long. Make some room for him by the fireside. Now, tell us some of those stories. Jack Gilford loves stories. He even has a title for what he does at the Pasadena Playhouse--"My Life in the Theatre, or How I Became an Overnight Success in 40 Years." What he does . . . well, you know Uncle Jack. He does take his time getting to the point. Gilford and that endearing face of his, combining familial warmth and coy mischief, is intact as ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1988 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
The excruciating "Arthur 2 on the Rocks" (citywide) should come with a surgeon general's warning: "This sort of stupidity may sap your will to live or to watch movies ever again." The most rotten thing about it, however, is that it obliterates any hint of the real "Arthur's" warmth or charm or wonderfully acid wit.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1985 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Set among the radiant waters of the Florida Gulf Coast, "Cocoon" (citywide) is a sly and salty bit of wish fulfillment that, by its tremendous close, has its entire audience wishing along with it. The combined energy it generates is probably enough to raise the Titanic. You need only the slimmest suggestion of its story--anything beyond that is robbery.
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