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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Jack Goldstein, an influential artist who explored the spectacular beauty and terrifying emptiness of modern life in performances, films and paintings during the 1970s and '80s, died Friday at his home in San Bernardino. He was 57. Goldstein had stopped making art in 1990 and suffered from chronic depression in recent years. He committed suicide, said Brian Butler, a Los Angeles dealer who represented him and presented a survey of his early work in 2001.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 2004
* Drug giant Merck & Co should have pulled its Vioxx painkiller from the market four years ago because data showing that it raised the risk of heart attacks has existed since 2000, Swiss scientists said. In a report for British medical journal the Lancet, researchers at the University of Bern said there was substantial evidence of the dangerous side effects of the drug by the end of 2000, but the data were not analyzed properly. * * Chiron Corp.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2002 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just inside the front door of the Luckman Gallery at Cal State L.A. hangs a painting made of three big masonite panels covered with jet black enamel. Each contains a small, realistically rendered astronaut. With no mother ship in sight, and with oxygen tubes dangling from their hermetically sealed suits like severed umbilical cords, the lost spacemen are utterly alone, completely detached from anything that might bring them back to terra firma.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2004 | Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Special to The Times
When Jack Goldstein hanged himself last March, his death was both predictable and surprising to his family and friends. The painter, who had been an influential student at CalArts and a star of the New York art scene in the 1980s, was known to be struggling with addictions to drugs and alcohol.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2004 | Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Special to The Times
When Jack Goldstein hanged himself last March, his death was both predictable and surprising to his family and friends. The painter, who had been an influential student at CalArts and a star of the New York art scene in the 1980s, was known to be struggling with addictions to drugs and alcohol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1986
Regarding the story (Nov. 6) about Jack Goldstein, owner of Jack's Bar in Boyle Heights, please relay my commendation to Times staff writer David Freed. Freed very accurately captured the essence of what Jack's Bar was all about, and provided an excellent profile of Jack Goldstein himself. It was an entertaining and flavorful story about a colorful person and place. I know a little bit about Jack's Bar, having spent seven years at Hollenbeck Station. And not once during that time did I ever sip a Perrier in a fern bar--not while Jack's was still open.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2004
* Drug giant Merck & Co should have pulled its Vioxx painkiller from the market four years ago because data showing that it raised the risk of heart attacks has existed since 2000, Swiss scientists said. In a report for British medical journal the Lancet, researchers at the University of Bern said there was substantial evidence of the dangerous side effects of the drug by the end of 2000, but the data were not analyzed properly. * * Chiron Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1986 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
For a generation of Los Angeles police officers who worked the Hollenbeck Division in Boyle Heights, Jack's Cocktails was the after-work oasis and Jack Goldstein was its sultan of suds. It was in his murky, Naugahyde dive across from the station house where the cops celebrated their promotions, grieved their fallen brothers and traded stories of the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
Jack Goldstein left Los Angeles for New York years ago but his painting has always hinted at the kind of detached contemplation of light and perception typical of L.A. masters like Robert Irwin and James Turrell. That connection has never been clearer than in a current crop of seven untitled paintings. They initially look like fluxing blob-abstractions stabilized by flat circles or lozenge shapes telling us where the flat of the paint surface lies.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS and * Asher/Faure Gallery: 612 N. Almont Drive, (213) 271-3665, to April 17. Closed Sunday and Monday.
Allure and Illusion: In his large recent paintings, Jack Goldstein lays out cold, brash geometric designs next to images of nearly perfect natural objects: human skin and eggshells. But rather than looking with the naked eye at these organic coverings, he paints from blow-ups of microscopic details, generated by a computer. A patch of skin looks like a topographic map and the surface of an eggshell becomes a vast, delicately modulated surface striated with faint vertical lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Jack Goldstein, an influential artist who explored the spectacular beauty and terrifying emptiness of modern life in performances, films and paintings during the 1970s and '80s, died Friday at his home in San Bernardino. He was 57. Goldstein had stopped making art in 1990 and suffered from chronic depression in recent years. He committed suicide, said Brian Butler, a Los Angeles dealer who represented him and presented a survey of his early work in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2002 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just inside the front door of the Luckman Gallery at Cal State L.A. hangs a painting made of three big masonite panels covered with jet black enamel. Each contains a small, realistically rendered astronaut. With no mother ship in sight, and with oxygen tubes dangling from their hermetically sealed suits like severed umbilical cords, the lost spacemen are utterly alone, completely detached from anything that might bring them back to terra firma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1986
Regarding the story (Nov. 6) about Jack Goldstein, owner of Jack's Bar in Boyle Heights, please relay my commendation to Times staff writer David Freed. Freed very accurately captured the essence of what Jack's Bar was all about, and provided an excellent profile of Jack Goldstein himself. It was an entertaining and flavorful story about a colorful person and place. I know a little bit about Jack's Bar, having spent seven years at Hollenbeck Station. And not once during that time did I ever sip a Perrier in a fern bar--not while Jack's was still open.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1986 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
For a generation of Los Angeles police officers who worked the Hollenbeck Division in Boyle Heights, Jack's Cocktails was the after-work oasis and Jack Goldstein was its sultan of suds. It was in his murky, Naugahyde dive across from the station house where the cops celebrated their promotions, grieved their fallen brothers and traded stories of the street.
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