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Jack Grapes

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December 10, 2003 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
An attractive brunet stands before the group and shares the erotic pleasures of her "no-underwear life." Others dredge up memories of a teenage infatuation with Swedish actress Bibi Andersson and of a father who fed his kids hot dogs while he ate steak. Gathered in Venice's Beyond Baroque theater, the supportive crowd greets each revelation with applause. But this is not group therapy.
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OPINION
August 19, 2004
The Times, in its beautifully written obituary of award-winning poet Donald Justice (Aug. 16), calls us poets a "jealous and competitive lot." Painters, actors, dancers, screenwriters are every bit as jealous and competitive, and I'm sure there are a few corporate managers, salesclerks and CEOs who are jealous and competitive. If there is a fault, it is in ourselves, to quote another poet. But I'm here to make the opposite point: I can't begin to count the number of times I've listened to poets recite the verse of another poet, singing the words as comfort against the nonchalant world.
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OPINION
August 19, 2004
The Times, in its beautifully written obituary of award-winning poet Donald Justice (Aug. 16), calls us poets a "jealous and competitive lot." Painters, actors, dancers, screenwriters are every bit as jealous and competitive, and I'm sure there are a few corporate managers, salesclerks and CEOs who are jealous and competitive. If there is a fault, it is in ourselves, to quote another poet. But I'm here to make the opposite point: I can't begin to count the number of times I've listened to poets recite the verse of another poet, singing the words as comfort against the nonchalant world.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2003 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
An attractive brunet stands before the group and shares the erotic pleasures of her "no-underwear life." Others dredge up memories of a teenage infatuation with Swedish actress Bibi Andersson and of a father who fed his kids hot dogs while he ate steak. Gathered in Venice's Beyond Baroque theater, the supportive crowd greets each revelation with applause. But this is not group therapy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1987 | DOUG SMITH
A slender redhead wearing a long black coat and a sequined black beret stood alone in the dark Friday night in a cold vigil outside Woodland Hills Community Church. She smiled a friendly smile and said hello to a stranger who walked past her into the church. Then, just before 8 p.m., she whisked briefly into the Breese Chapel, a modest room where poets gather on the third Friday of each month to read their work and listen as others read in the Valley Contemporary Poets Series.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1986 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I like it that the play is comedy, that it's farce, that it has pathos, that it's stupid, that it's sophomoric--and it's Shakespeare too," said Jack Grapes of his and Bill Cakmis' "Circle of Will," currently at the Zephyr Theatre. Early, speculative Shakespeare, one hastens to add. "It's about the young Will Shakespeare (played by Grapes) and the young Richard Burbage (Cakmis), before any of Will's plays get off the ground," Cakmis said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1996 | NICK GREEN
Readings by several distinguished poets, including Jack Grapes, editor of the literary journal Onthebus, will be given June 9 in Thousand Oaks by the local American Assn. of University Women chapter. The 8 p.m. event is planned for Borders Books, 125 W. Thousand Oaks Blvd. Among those also reading will be Verve publisher Ron Reichick, Pepperdine University professor Michael Collings and Moorpark College instructor Jane Autenrieth Chapman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1996 | ERIC WAHLGREN
The Thousand Oaks branch of the American Assn. of University Women is sponsoring a free poetry reading Sunday that will feature several renowned wordsmiths. Poet Jack Grapes, editor of the ONTHEBUS literary journal, Verve publisher Ron Reichick and Moorpark College creative writing instructor Jane Autenrieth Chapman will read their work at Borders Books and Music, 124 W. Thousand Oaks Blvd., beginning at 8 p.m.
NEWS
June 17, 1989
For reasons known but to the Muse, the Los Angeles poetry scene, long dormant, has begun to burgeon again, most notably under the inspirational aegis of a group called Poetry in Motion. PIM has attracted not only a host of prominent California poets but the sizable support of celebrity votaries as well, many of whom join in the readings, some from their own body of work. Having outgrown its regular Tuesday night sessions at the ultrachic Helena's, PIM recently moved to Heartbreak Cafe, only to overflow again and decamp to Cafe Largo.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1986 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Only in the sober light of a Sunday afternoon, after Jack Grapes and Bill Cakmis' speculative frolic about Shakespeare's early years, "Circle of Will," has played out, do we question the show. The play being the thing, however, Grapes and Cakmis have us between their sneaky little fingers when the lights are up at the Zephyr Theatre.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1987 | DOUG SMITH
A slender redhead wearing a long black coat and a sequined black beret stood alone in the dark Friday night in a cold vigil outside Woodland Hills Community Church. She smiled a friendly smile and said hello to a stranger who walked past her into the church. Then, just before 8 p.m., she whisked briefly into the Breese Chapel, a modest room where poets gather on the third Friday of each month to read their work and listen as others read in the Valley Contemporary Poets Series.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1986 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I like it that the play is comedy, that it's farce, that it has pathos, that it's stupid, that it's sophomoric--and it's Shakespeare too," said Jack Grapes of his and Bill Cakmis' "Circle of Will," currently at the Zephyr Theatre. Early, speculative Shakespeare, one hastens to add. "It's about the young Will Shakespeare (played by Grapes) and the young Richard Burbage (Cakmis), before any of Will's plays get off the ground," Cakmis said.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | ROSE APODACA, Rose Apodaca is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition.
Though Walt Whitman died in 1892, his work has endured, perhaps due to a spirit that embraces and celebrates the individual even in a growing, industrial society. On Friday, the Tertulias, Orange County's PEN chapter (a group of poets, playwrights, editors, essayists and novelists), will mark the 100th anniversary of the poet's death with a bilingual reading of "Song of Myself" from his volume "Leaves of Grass."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1989 | LAURIE OCHOA
She's a best-selling novelist. And, according to her, she is "the most famous female poet in Los Angeles." But Kate Braverman's life as a writer has not been easy. In a Times interview last year, her mother remembered Braverman telling a group of UCLA writing students: "The pain you suffer is enormous. If you can be anything else but a writer, be it." You'd better want to "spend 10 years like I did in a bathrobe because that's what it takes."
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