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Jack Greene

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2013
Jack Greene Grand Ole Opry star sang hit 1960s tune Jack Greene, 83, a longtime Grand Ole Opry star who earned fame with the late 1960s hit "There Goes My Everything," died Thursday at his Nashville, Tenn., home from complications of Alzheimer's disease, a Grand Ole Opry spokeswoman said. The plaintive ballad showed off his deep voice, made him a star and earned him Single of the Year and Male Vocalist of the Year awards from the Country Music Assn. in 1967. The song inspired thousands "who had lost loved ones" to write him, Greene later said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2013
Jack Greene Grand Ole Opry star sang hit 1960s tune Jack Greene, 83, a longtime Grand Ole Opry star who earned fame with the late 1960s hit "There Goes My Everything," died Thursday at his Nashville, Tenn., home from complications of Alzheimer's disease, a Grand Ole Opry spokeswoman said. The plaintive ballad showed off his deep voice, made him a star and earned him Single of the Year and Male Vocalist of the Year awards from the Country Music Assn. in 1967. The song inspired thousands "who had lost loved ones" to write him, Greene later said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1990 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 25 years at Johns Hopkins University, renowned Early American history scholar Jack Greene decided it was time to do something "radically different." He mentioned those restive feelings to a UC Irvine history professor and former graduate student in a chance telephone call last June. Now, after a 10-month courtship, the former Andrew Mellon Professor of Humanities at the Baltimore campus is coming to Irvine as UCI's first "distinguished professor" of history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1990 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 25 years at Johns Hopkins University, renowned Early American history scholar Jack Greene decided it was time to do something "radically different." He mentioned those restive feelings to a UC Irvine history professor and former graduate student in a chance telephone call last June. Now, after a 10-month courtship, the former Andrew Mellon Professor of Humanities at the Baltimore campus is coming to Irvine as UCI's first "distinguished professor" of history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1996 | MATT KOHLMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When taking his son to school more than a decade ago, Thomas Mealey would often wave to a 16-year-old boy he had represented as a lawyer. The boy wasn't going to class. The teenager, who had been expelled, would walk his friends to school and stake out houses to burglarize. Scores of crimes later, the teenager wound up in the Wyoming State Penitentiary. "It's a broken record," Mealey said. "It's an old story in Wyoming and lots of other places."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1993 | TOM McQUEENEY and JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tollway officials gave a construction firm the final go-ahead Thursday to begin work on the $1-billion San Joaquin Hills toll road, Orange County's most environmentally embattled project. Construction could begin within a few weeks. The six-lane road will extend California 73 from the John Wayne Airport area to Interstate 5 near San Juan Capistrano. The first segment, between Laguna Canyon Road and Moulton Parkway, is expected to open in three years.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | DALE RUSSAKOFF, THE WASHINGTON POST
You know things have gotten out of hand when a bank robber has to borrow a pen from a teller to write his holdup note. This wacky turn of events occurred during robbery No. 120 in a bizarre epidemic of heists that has kept this city alternately in jitters and stitches as robbers hit as many as three or four banks in a day. People seem to rob banks here almost as casually as they tap automated tellers, nailing the same bank two, three, even five times.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1991 | JOHN PENNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yes, not all musical reunions need be synonymous with self-parody. There are even those rare few regroupings worthy of the term revival , such as the regeneration of the Knitters at the Coach House Saturday night. The Knitters on display here rekindled the spark, frivolity and genuineness--and then some--of the quintet that developed from a side project for members of L.A. punk/rockabilly bands into a cult favorite during the mid-1980s.
NEWS
February 10, 2002 | ALEC MacGILLIS, BALTIMORE SUN
It may seem like a petty squabble, the academic equivalent of arguing over a parking space: Which college has the right to claim to be the first one formed in the new United States? But what is at stake in the dispute between Washington College and Dickinson College, the schools say, is nothing less than the historical truth about the founding of the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Chicken-stompers, hog-callers and corn-haulers--can it be that the Knitters are back? One of the most endearing things to come out of the Los Angeles scene in the '80s was the Knitters, that porch-grade country and folk band comprising Exene Cervenka, John Doe and D.J. Bonebrake from the typically dead serious X with the Blasters' guitarist Dave Alvin and D.I. bassist Jonny Ray Bartel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1992 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Chief Willie L. Williams unveiled the first step of a citywide community policing plan Tuesday that he said would be a "new beginning" for public confidence in his department by creating citizen advisory councils, shifting basic police attitudes and retraining key officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The atmosphere seemed festive, even carnival-like at UC Irvine last week as returning students engaged in rope-pulling contests, dunk-the-student-leader ball tosses, and sampled the competing delicacies of Korean barbecue and freshly baked cookies.
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