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Jack Hardy

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March 20, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
New York singer-songwriter Jack Hardy realized a hard-core folkie's dream last year after the president of his record label returned from overseas. "[He] told me he heard a group in Ireland . . . play one of my songs," said Hardy, 51, by telephone from his flat on Houston Street, which splits Greenwich Village and SoHo. "Only they had no idea it was mine. "They said it was a traditional tune they learned in Galway. To me, that's much more of an accolade than having a hit song," Hardy said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
New York singer-songwriter Jack Hardy realized a hard-core folkie's dream last year after the president of his record label returned from overseas. "[He] told me he heard a group in Ireland . . . play one of my songs," said Hardy, 51, by telephone from his flat on Houston Street, which splits Greenwich Village and SoHo. "Only they had no idea it was mine. "They said it was a traditional tune they learned in Galway. To me, that's much more of an accolade than having a hit song," Hardy said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1999
Music * The Paul McNeff Singers and KidSingers present "Concert for Peace, Gospel Jubilee," Santa Ana High School auditorium, 520 W. Walnut St. 7 tonight. $5-$12. (714) 525-7464. * The Chapman University Chamber Orchestra performs at 8 tonight in the Salmon Recital Hall on campus, 333 N. Glassell St., Orange. $5-$10. Also playing at 8 is the Orange County Guitar Circle in the campus' Irvine Lecture Hall. $5. (714) 997-6871.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Georgiana Hardy, whose election to the Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education in 1955 signaled the collapse of an archconservative majority and the beginning of a liberal era in local education, has died, it was learned Tuesday. The woman who served 20 years on the board--believed longer than anyone else in the 134-year history of the school system--was 78 when she died of heart failure Monday at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1999
TODAY 9:30am Lecture The Crescendo chapter of the guilds of the Orange County Performing Arts Center presents "Revenge of the Dumped." Olivia Goldsmith, author of the novel "First Wives Club," is the speaker. * "Revenge of the Dumped," Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana. 9:30 a.m. $25. (714) 567-3600.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2001 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even when she talked about characters such as the abused child "Luka" or places like "Tom's Diner," singer-songwriter Suzanne Vega's work always had an intimate feeling. Now, following several major shake-ups in Vega's life, the tunes on her new album, "Songs in Red and Gray," have come out more personal than ever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1999 | Cecilia Rasmussen
It's probably no accident that films and sensational celebrity murders have long been two of Los Angeles' most successful exports. The two genres' successful examples, after all, often combine similar elements: sex, money, attractive protagonists, colorful supporting players and complex subplots. Good locations help, too: Americans relish the satisfying intimation that behind their affluent neighbors' polished doors lurks unhappiness dark and deep.
SPORTS
May 26, 1989 | TOM VERDUCCI, Newsday
Baseball hit the quarter pole on Sunday. By then, every club but the Baltimore Orioles had played its 40th game, the unofficial, if inexact, mark of one-fourth of the season. The formula to figure out what the rest of the year might be like is easy: just multiply the statistics by four. Of course, the formula is mostly for fun, not for accurate predictions. For instance, New York Mets' catcher Gary Carter, who hit eight homers through May 16 last year, was on a pace to hit 32 home runs.
SPORTS
May 28, 1989 | Ross Newhan
Now or never? The decision by the Montreal Expos to trade pitching prospects Randy Johnson, Brian Holman and Gene Harris for the Seattle Mariners' Mark Langston isn't a now or never situation, but it's close. Call it: Win now or, perhaps, not again in the near future. Call it a calculated gamble--three prospects for a proven pitcher who becomes a free agent at the end of the season, and had already rejected a three-year, $7.1 million contract from the Mariners and looms as difficult to sign for the Expos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Benjamin Hayes rode into the pueblo on a mule Feb. 2, 1850, carrying a shotgun and a Bowie knife for protection. Later that year, he became the first county attorney. In two years, he was elected district judge, traveling by horseback and carriage throughout Southern California to administer justice, according to historian W.W. Robinson in his 1959 book "Lawyers of Los Angeles."
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