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Jack Hayford

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1997
"It was immensely gratifying to see the clarity of focus at the Promise Keepers' rally in Washington. This was not a political event, but men wanting to accept their responsibilities and follow God with their whole heart." NAME: Jack W.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2004 | Christiana Sciaudone, Times Staff Writer
The new president of the Los Angeles-based International Church of the Foursquare Gospel said he wanted to restore a sense of confidence in the leadership of the independent Pentecostal denomination. After all, the past two leaders both left their offices after financial investments resulted in substantial losses for the church. Jack Hayford, who is preparing to start his five-year presidency Oct.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1993 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The six-foot-long, hand-carved sign hanging over the front door of the Rev. Jack Hayford's Granada Hills home proclaims "We Believe in Santa Claus"--a Christmas credo that would bring cries of blasphemy against many other conservative pastors. But it is not a problem for Hayford within his 8,000-member Church on the Way in Van Nuys. The new sign, a gift from his wife, Anna, was put up in time for about 1,000 church members to see as they poured through his home on a recent weekend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1998 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Decrying the anti-Halloween howls from other conservative churches, a nationally prominent pastor says that he will work over the next five years to recapture both the fun and the religious aspects of the holiday for evangelical and Pentecostal Christians. "Let's stop cursing the darkness and light a candle," the Rev. Jack Hayford told the 10,000-member Church on the Way in Van Nuys in a sermon Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1997 | JOHN DART
In 1953 and 1954, a Bible college student in Los Angeles named Jack Hayford drove daily into Van Nuys as a messenger for the old Security Pacific Bank, "never dreaming I would ever have a church out here." Nevertheless, in 1969, the Foursquare Gospel minister accepted the pastor's role at a struggling, 18-member church on Sherman Way in Van Nuys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1998 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Decrying the anti-Halloween howls from other conservative churches, a nationally prominent pastor says that he will work over the next five years to recapture both the fun and the religious aspects of the holiday for evangelical and Pentecostal Christians. "Let's stop cursing the darkness and light a candle," the Rev. Jack Hayford told the 10,000-member Church on the Way in Van Nuys in a sermon Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No, that was not the Rev. Jack Hayford, pastor of Van Nuys' conservative Church on the Way, telling a Los Angeles radio call-in show that he had had an out-of-body, near-death experience and was changing his stance on salvation. Nor did he say that he had started an "out-of-body experience group" in his congregation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen minutes before the early service ended, the pastor slipped away from his pulpit in Van Nuys. Stopping only to let an assistant apply hair spray to flatten an errant lock, the minister stepped briskly to a waiting car. The Rev. Jack Hayford was beginning his demanding Sunday morning shuttle between four overlapping services at Church on the Way, which has two sanctuaries half a mile apart. The car radio was tuned to a live broadcast of the 9 a.m. service at the other church building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2004 | Christiana Sciaudone, Times Staff Writer
The new president of the Los Angeles-based International Church of the Foursquare Gospel said he wanted to restore a sense of confidence in the leadership of the independent Pentecostal denomination. After all, the past two leaders both left their offices after financial investments resulted in substantial losses for the church. Jack Hayford, who is preparing to start his five-year presidency Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1993 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The six-foot-long, hand-carved sign hanging over the front door of the Rev. Jack Hayford's home proclaims, "We believe in Santa Claus"--a Christmas credo that would bring cries of blasphemy against many other conservative pastors. It's not a problem for Hayford within his 8,000-member Church on the Way in Van Nuys where a large Christmas tree now dominates each of the church's two sanctuaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1997
"It was immensely gratifying to see the clarity of focus at the Promise Keepers' rally in Washington. This was not a political event, but men wanting to accept their responsibilities and follow God with their whole heart." NAME: Jack W.
NEWS
October 5, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's nothing new for the residents of the Los Angeles Mission to stand, surrounded by men, and pray for the power to change their lives. At home, the recovering addicts gather each morning at 7 for an hour of group devotions in the shelter on skid row. And at every stop on a cross-country bus trek to Washington last week, they held a testimonial meeting, the leader selected randomly. Saturday afternoon, however, the congregation was just a little bit bigger. OK, a lot bigger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1997 | JOHN DART
In 1953 and 1954, a Bible college student in Los Angeles named Jack Hayford drove daily into Van Nuys as a messenger for the old Security Pacific Bank, "never dreaming I would ever have a church out here." Nevertheless, in 1969, the Foursquare Gospel minister accepted the pastor's role at a struggling, 18-member church on Sherman Way in Van Nuys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1993 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The six-foot-long, hand-carved sign hanging over the front door of the Rev. Jack Hayford's home proclaims, "We believe in Santa Claus"--a Christmas credo that would bring cries of blasphemy against many other conservative pastors. It's not a problem for Hayford within his 8,000-member Church on the Way in Van Nuys where a large Christmas tree now dominates each of the church's two sanctuaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1993 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The six-foot-long, hand-carved sign hanging over the front door of the Rev. Jack Hayford's Granada Hills home proclaims "We Believe in Santa Claus"--a Christmas credo that would bring cries of blasphemy against many other conservative pastors. But it is not a problem for Hayford within his 8,000-member Church on the Way in Van Nuys. The new sign, a gift from his wife, Anna, was put up in time for about 1,000 church members to see as they poured through his home on a recent weekend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No, that was not the Rev. Jack Hayford, pastor of Van Nuys' conservative Church on the Way, telling a Los Angeles radio call-in show that he had had an out-of-body, near-death experience and was changing his stance on salvation. Nor did he say that he had started an "out-of-body experience group" in his congregation.
NEWS
October 5, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's nothing new for the residents of the Los Angeles Mission to stand, surrounded by men, and pray for the power to change their lives. At home, the recovering addicts gather each morning at 7 for an hour of group devotions in the shelter on skid row. And at every stop on a cross-country bus trek to Washington last week, they held a testimonial meeting, the leader selected randomly. Saturday afternoon, however, the congregation was just a little bit bigger. OK, a lot bigger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1997
John Dart's article covering the historic cross landmark was both sensitive and informative ("Church on the Way Assumes Expenses for Historic Cross," May 17). He is to be commended and The Times, also, for giving God, George Otis and Jack Hayford space. OLIVE FALLON Lancaster
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifteen minutes before the early service ended, the pastor slipped away from his pulpit in Van Nuys. Stopping only to let an assistant apply hair spray to flatten an errant lock, the minister stepped briskly to a waiting car. The Rev. Jack Hayford was beginning his demanding Sunday morning shuttle between four overlapping services at Church on the Way, which has two sanctuaries half a mile apart. The car radio was tuned to a live broadcast of the 9 a.m. service at the other church building.
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