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Jack Healey

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September 23, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND
For a man responsible for cheerleading a human rights organization in the United States, Jack Healey--the guiding force behind the "Human Rights Now!" tour--sounded surprisingly downbeat backstage Wednesday night at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Though he cited the successes of the tour in promoting human rights causes, Healey was plainly concerned about the toll that the global rock tour--now at the halfway point in its six-week schedule--was taking on the staff and crew.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's dumped the T-shirt and put on a good sport coat for this, a tie, for God's sake, good shoes. But his gray hair is still splaying out of his ponytail. He's still urgent, still mad. It's like they say: You can take the man out of the street, but you can't take the street out of the man. Jack Healey isn't about to let the world forget its shortcomings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's dumped the T-shirt and put on a good sport coat for this, a tie, for God's sake, good shoes. But his gray hair is still splaying out of his ponytail. He's still urgent, still mad. It's like they say: You can take the man out of the street, but you can't take the street out of the man. Jack Healey isn't about to let the world forget its shortcomings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1995 | Steve Hochman
Get ready for another comeback by a top figure from the '80s rock world. No, not Billy Idol nor John Mellencamp. It isn't even a performer. It's Jack Healey--a 57-year-old ex-priest who is virtually the antithesis of a rock star. But it was his friendships with rock stars that, in his role as the executive director of Amnesty International, brought about a series of pop music charity and education events that helped define the era. It culminated with the 1988 "Human Rights Now!"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1995 | Steve Hochman
Get ready for another comeback by a top figure from the '80s rock world. No, not Billy Idol nor John Mellencamp. It isn't even a performer. It's Jack Healey--a 57-year-old ex-priest who is virtually the antithesis of a rock star. But it was his friendships with rock stars that, in his role as the executive director of Amnesty International, brought about a series of pop music charity and education events that helped define the era. It culminated with the 1988 "Human Rights Now!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
Should we be cynical about the lasting impact of rock benefit concerts? Let's look at the aftermath of the six-city Amnesty International tour that ended with a nationally televised, 11-hour concert featuring U2, the Police and Bryan Adams on June 15 at Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. That was 11 weeks ago and the human-rights organization was basking in the spotlight. Jack Healey, executive director of the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1988 | ROBERT HILBURN
Frumpy, graying Jack Healey has a folksy demeanor that would make him ideal to play the Barry Fitzgerald role in "Going My Way." But when Healey, the executive director of Amnesty International in the United States, starts talking about human rights issues, he displays an eloquence and passion that transcends this image. He often becomes so emotional when condemning governments who torture and murder their own citizens that his eyes well with tears.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1996 | Steve Hochman
Rock stars Bono and Peter Gabriel aren't the only types supporting former Amnesty International head Jack Healey's new Human Rights Action Center. Members of the punk world are doing their bit by participating in a benefit CD supporting Healey's campaign for a 1998 global celebration of the U.N. Declaration of Human Rights' 50th anniversary. Among those joining in are veterans Iggy Pop, Exene Cervenka, John Doe and Bad Brains, and younger upstarts NOFX, Pennywise and Lagwagon.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1988
It is amazing that people such as Bill Graham, Jack Healey and Brian Murphy are stupefied that the Amnesty International concert didn't sell out in Los Angeles ("The Amnesty Tour--Conscience & Compromise," by Robert Hilburn, Sept. 18). While Hilburn's article gave the fact that the show was on a weeknight, it ignored the fact that it was scheduled on Yom Kippur--the holiest day in the Jewish religion. Couple that with the second-largest Jewish population in the country and you can see why there were so many tickets available.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND
For a man responsible for cheerleading a human rights organization in the United States, Jack Healey--the guiding force behind the "Human Rights Now!" tour--sounded surprisingly downbeat backstage Wednesday night at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Though he cited the successes of the tour in promoting human rights causes, Healey was plainly concerned about the toll that the global rock tour--now at the halfway point in its six-week schedule--was taking on the staff and crew.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1988 | ROBERT HILBURN
Frumpy, graying Jack Healey has a folksy demeanor that would make him ideal to play the Barry Fitzgerald role in "Going My Way." But when Healey, the executive director of Amnesty International in the United States, starts talking about human rights issues, he displays an eloquence and passion that transcends this image. He often becomes so emotional when condemning governments who torture and murder their own citizens that his eyes well with tears.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
Should we be cynical about the lasting impact of rock benefit concerts? Let's look at the aftermath of the six-city Amnesty International tour that ended with a nationally televised, 11-hour concert featuring U2, the Police and Bryan Adams on June 15 at Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. That was 11 weeks ago and the human-rights organization was basking in the spotlight. Jack Healey, executive director of the U.S.
OPINION
February 16, 1992
In "First Haitian Refugees Returned to Homeland" (Feb. 4), your reporter said: "Most of them say they are unafraid, happy to be back." But later he quotes a foreign official saying "many of these people say what they think will do them the most good." The reporter further comments ". . . but the fear showed through when several of the refugees asked reporters if it was true that soldier were waiting to kill them." This fear was generated by the media, not by the reality of the Haitian situation.
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