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Jack Heller

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1998
A new professional theater company in Ventura has been announced by its artistic director, Los Angeles actor Jack Heller. To be called Theatre on Main, the company would occupy a former United Pentecostal church at Main and Laurel, recently bought by local businessman Doug Halter, who has donated the space to Heller's nonprofit corporation for several months. The seating capacity will be around 200.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1998
A new professional theater company in Ventura has been announced by its artistic director, Los Angeles actor Jack Heller. To be called Theatre on Main, the company would occupy a former United Pentecostal church at Main and Laurel, recently bought by local businessman Doug Halter, who has donated the space to Heller's nonprofit corporation for several months. The seating capacity will be around 200.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013
N. Richard Nash's "The Rainmaker," 1950s-era chestnut about a "spinster" swept up in romance by a dazzling con man, can be laughably archaic. However, at Edgemar Center for the Arts, director Jack Heller crafts a striking, specific portrait of a bygone time. As for the pitch-perfect performances, they should all be distilled, bottled and preserved for posterity. 2437 Main St., Santa Monica. 7:30 p.m. Fri. and Sat., 5 p.m. Sun. Ends Sept. 29. $34.50. (310) 392-7327. http://www.edgemarcenter.org .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1996 | SCOTT COLLINS
The title characters of "Marvin and Mel" at Actors Alley in North Hollywood are two once-hot, middle-aged television writers who haven't had a hit show, or even a pitch meeting, in a long time. Network executives are looking for youth and this duo has everything but. Mel Weiner (Len Lesser) is a tireless funnyman whose gift of gag is somewhat undermined by his fragile ego.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1998 | PHILIP BRANDES
Despite a long succession of sexual encounters, playwright Tennessee Williams remained an untouchable, solitary figure throughout his sadly self-destructive life. In his fictional biography, "Tennessee in the Summer," Joe Besecker hit on a novel way to give his subject some onstage company--splitting Williams' character into male and female halves to represent different facets of his character.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2001 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are many reasons for a family reunion--weddings, funerals and, in Edward Allan Baker's "Crying Rocks" at the new Laurelgrove Theatre, shooting your husband. In the play's double-cast premiere, the cast that performs on Sundays gives fierce portrayals that wring laughter out of tragedy. Jack Heller deftly directs this sensitive drama about the cycle of spousal abuse and its effects on a blue-collar mother and her four daughters. Heller doesn't make sympathizing with the victim easy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Robert Abele
Henry Jaglom films dare you to forego your appetite for slickness, cohesion and subtlety, and in the cases when they succeed, it's because the iconoclastic writer-director's upfront sincerity and satire - usually at the expense of Hollywood - are enough. But his latest, "Just 45 Minutes From Broadway," an adaptation of his own play, is an investment in theatrical self-indulgence with diminishing returns. A queasy paean to show folk, it concerns the fraught reunion of two estranged sisters - emotionally unstable New York stage actress Pandora (Jaglom's open nerve muse Tanna Frederick)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1993 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In both Matthew Witten's "The Ties That Bind" and Conrad Bromberg's "Dr. Galley," a male professor's wife has taken a lesbian lover. This isn't much of a tie to bind these two one-acts together. But no matter. They make up a fairly provocative double bill at the Chamber Theatre. They're directed by Jim Holmes, an award winner for "Avenue A" a couple of years ago, and produced by Gloria Mann, another "Avenue A" alum. Witten's play is the more optimistic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1998 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Friedrich Durrenmatt's "Play Strindberg (without tears . . . )" at the Strasberg Center's Marilyn Monroe Theatre is a seldom-produced nugget that, thanks to the efforts of veteran director Martin Magner and a 24-carat cast, proves a golden occasion. Seen here in James Kirkup's translation, Durrenmatt's piece was inspired by Strindberg's "Dance of Death."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2001 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1990, Father Bruce Ritter, the Catholic priest who founded the Covenant House shelters, was accused of sexual improprieties with some homeless young men under his care. Although he was never charged with any crime, the priest resigned, and the scandal nearly caused the collapse of the charitable organization for at-risk teenagers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2013 | By F. Kathleen Foley
The 1950s gave rise to a bumper crop of treacly melodramas. N. Richard Nash's 1954 play, “The Rainmaker,” was certainly a product of its time.  Set on a Depression-era Midwestern farm during a terrible drought, the play concerns the romantic travails of Lizzie, a plain-shoes good ol' gal who seems likely to remain a ... gasp ... spinster. By present-day standards, Lizzie's tremulous epiphany that she will be an “old maid” seems downright archaic. And Starbuck, the dazzlingly glib con man who sweeps Lizzie up into romantic adventure, is overblown.
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