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Jack Hirschman

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June 16, 2006 | Justin M. Norton, The Associated Press
Half a century ago, a young writer named Jack Hirschman wrote to Ernest Hemingway, seeking advice. He was stunned when perhaps the world's most famous author wrote back. "I can't help you, kid," Hemingway wrote. "You write better than I did when I was 19. But the hell of it is, you write like me. That is no sin. But you won't get anywhere with it." Hirschman took the advice, developing a working-class style of poetry that made him a vital, if lesser-known, voice of the Beat Generation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2006 | Justin M. Norton, The Associated Press
Half a century ago, a young writer named Jack Hirschman wrote to Ernest Hemingway, seeking advice. He was stunned when perhaps the world's most famous author wrote back. "I can't help you, kid," Hemingway wrote. "You write better than I did when I was 19. But the hell of it is, you write like me. That is no sin. But you won't get anywhere with it." Hirschman took the advice, developing a working-class style of poetry that made him a vital, if lesser-known, voice of the Beat Generation.
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BOOKS
August 25, 2002 | KAI MARISTED, Kai Maristed is the author of, among other works, "Belong to Me: Stories" and the novel "Fall."
Christopher Columbus named his first landfall Hispaniola, in honor of his Spanish employers, declaring its blue natural harbors and lush hills a paradise on Earth. The island was called "Ayiti," or "high land," by native Ciboney Indians, soon to be eradicated by European germs and steel. Today, Hispaniola hosts two separate worlds. The fertile eastern plain belongs to the relatively viable Dominican Republic, a country whose export earnings are augmented by a booming tourist industry.
BOOKS
August 25, 2002 | KAI MARISTED, Kai Maristed is the author of, among other works, "Belong to Me: Stories" and the novel "Fall."
Christopher Columbus named his first landfall Hispaniola, in honor of his Spanish employers, declaring its blue natural harbors and lush hills a paradise on Earth. The island was called "Ayiti," or "high land," by native Ciboney Indians, soon to be eradicated by European germs and steel. Today, Hispaniola hosts two separate worlds. The fertile eastern plain belongs to the relatively viable Dominican Republic, a country whose export earnings are augmented by a booming tourist industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2006 | From Associated Press
Jack Hirschman, a prolific Beat Generation poet known for decades of social activism, has been selected as San Francisco's new poet laureate, Mayor Gavin Newsom said. "I want someone who will challenge the status quo," Newsom said of the 72-year-old poet. The appointment surprised some because Hirschman supported Newsom's opponent, Green Party member Matt Gonzalez, in the city's 2003 mayoral race.
NEWS
March 1, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
AT 6 foot 7, Charles Olson (1910-70) was literally and figuratively a behemoth of American poetry. Although he was deeply rooted in the land and sea around Gloucester, Mass., his work went on to influence writers all over the country, most obviously the Beats, the avant-garde poets of North Carolina's Black Mountain College, the aesthetes of the New York School and the Language poets of 1970s San Francisco.
NEWS
April 26, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
AMBER TAMBLYN admits she was a "completely overly hyperactive child" who was a "wild stray hair on the head of the world" before she became an actress. "Acting solved my OCD and ADD," she said, sipping on a cappuccino at the Rose Cafe in Venice. "I was just crazy. I had a pet rat. I would create little tiny plays we would put on in school that would be for our English class. I was sort of directionless and wild." Until she appeared in her grade school's production of "Pippi Longstocking."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2004 | Carolyn Patricia Scott, Times Staff Writer
TV writers may have scripted spiritual conversations between God and the alter ego of "Joan of Arcadia" star Amber Tamblyn, but it turns out the young actress is pretty good at delivering spirited lines of her own -- in the form of poetry. Tamblyn, the protege of longtime family friend and poet Jack Hirschman, had her first poem published at age 10, and has self-published two volumes of her work.
MAGAZINE
March 8, 1987 | DENNIS McDOUGAL
Q--How long have you been in radio, Ruth? A--Since '62. Q--So you've been doing it for 25 years? A--Well, no, not the whole time. I went to Europe for awhile. In '65 I was reporting from there. Doing interviews. One day, I threw my tape recorder into the Aegean and went off to live on a Greek island. I gave up an interview with Jean-Paul Sartre when he won the Nobel Prize to go to Greece and be an existentialist. Q--You gave up a Sartre interview to live on a Greek island?
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruth Seymour is in a funk. She's half an hour late for dinner, famished, but in no mood to eat, let alone be interviewed. "Maybe this was a bad idea," she says, barely audible above the din of Hal's Bar & Grill, a favorite Venice hangout. She relents and orders a salad anyway. It's been a rough day and the woman who shaped public radio station KCRW in her own image needs time to decompress.
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