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Jack Ingram

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When alt-country musician Jack Ingram phoned in more than an hour late for an appointed interview, he matter-of-factly blamed it on the Red-Headed Stranger. The musician (Willie Nelson) and the album. Ingram said he simply got "carried away" listening to Nelson's watershed "Red Headed Stranger" album, which has just been reissued with three previously unreleased bonus tracks on Sony Legacy. The 1975 concept album about the Old West yielded his now-classic hit "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain."
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SPORTS
May 22, 2013 | By Jim Peltz
Dale Jarrett and the late Glenn "Fireball" Roberts were among those in the newest five-member class elected Wednesday to the NASCAR Hall of Fame. The others elected in the class of 2014 were drivers Tim Flock and Jack Ingram, along with engine builder Maurice Petty, brother of legendary driver Richard Petty. Jarrett was the 1999 champion of what is now called NASCAR's Sprint Cup Series, and he was a three-time winner of the Daytona 500. His father Ned, a two-time series champion in the 1960s, already is in the NASCAR Hall of Fame.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2009 | Associated Press
Country singer Jack Ingram is talked out. Guinness World Record spokeswoman Laura Plunkett said Ingram set a record for most consecutive radio interviews in 24 hours. He gave 215 interviews between 8 a.m. Tuesday and 8 a.m. Wednesday as part of a promotional blitz for his new album, "Big Dreams & High Hopes." From the base of the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, he spoke by phone with radio stations in most of the 50 states and parts of Canada, Ireland and Australia. The previous record was 96.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1997 | ROBERT HILBURN
Underground country singer-songwriter Jack Ingram arrived Tuesday at the House of Blues with lots of impressive endorsements, including one from Steve Earle, who co-produced "Livin' or Dyin'," the fellow Texan's major-label debut album on MCA-distributed Rising Tide Records. Opening for headliner Junior Brown (who was reviewed here recently), Ingram and his three-piece band asserted an Earle-like independence from the bland, pop-leaning, hat-act mentality that is gripping Nashville.
SPORTS
May 22, 2013 | By Jim Peltz
Dale Jarrett and the late Glenn "Fireball" Roberts were among those in the newest five-member class elected Wednesday to the NASCAR Hall of Fame. The others elected in the class of 2014 were drivers Tim Flock and Jack Ingram, along with engine builder Maurice Petty, brother of legendary driver Richard Petty. Jarrett was the 1999 champion of what is now called NASCAR's Sprint Cup Series, and he was a three-time winner of the Daytona 500. His father Ned, a two-time series champion in the 1960s, already is in the NASCAR Hall of Fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2009 | Associated Press
Country singer Jack Ingram is talked out. Guinness World Record spokeswoman Laura Plunkett said Ingram set a record for most consecutive radio interviews in 24 hours. He gave 215 interviews between 8 a.m. Tuesday and 8 a.m. Wednesday as part of a promotional blitz for his new album, "Big Dreams & High Hopes." From the base of the Brooklyn Bridge in New York, he spoke by phone with radio stations in most of the 50 states and parts of Canada, Ireland and Australia. The previous record was 96.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2007 | Holly Gleason, Special to The Times
WALKING the line is hard, but when it's the one separating Texas' insurrectionist songwriters from mainstream country stars, it can be death-defying. These days, Jack Ingram -- the churning rocky tonker who draws heavily on Waylon Jennings' and Rodney Crowell's robustly personal styles -- isn't just walking the line but eradicating it. "This Is It," his new album, just bowed at No. 4 on Billboard's country album chart and No. 34 on the overall pop album list. To do that, Ingram rose at 2:30 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2007 | Holly Gleason, Special to The Times
WALKING the line is hard, but when it's the one separating Texas' insurrectionist songwriters from mainstream country stars, it can be death-defying. These days, Jack Ingram -- the churning rocky tonker who draws heavily on Waylon Jennings' and Rodney Crowell's robustly personal styles -- isn't just walking the line but eradicating it. "This Is It," his new album, just bowed at No. 4 on Billboard's country album chart and No. 34 on the overall pop album list. To do that, Ingram rose at 2:30 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When alt-country musician Jack Ingram phoned in more than an hour late for an appointed interview, he matter-of-factly blamed it on the Red-Headed Stranger. The musician (Willie Nelson) and the album. Ingram said he simply got "carried away" listening to Nelson's watershed "Red Headed Stranger" album, which has just been reissued with three previously unreleased bonus tracks on Sony Legacy. The 1975 concept album about the Old West yielded his now-classic hit "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1997 | ROBERT HILBURN
Underground country singer-songwriter Jack Ingram arrived Tuesday at the House of Blues with lots of impressive endorsements, including one from Steve Earle, who co-produced "Livin' or Dyin'," the fellow Texan's major-label debut album on MCA-distributed Rising Tide Records. Opening for headliner Junior Brown (who was reviewed here recently), Ingram and his three-piece band asserted an Earle-like independence from the bland, pop-leaning, hat-act mentality that is gripping Nashville.
TRAVEL
June 9, 1985
Several months ago we read in your paper about an agency in Washington, D.C., that would help us with booking a hotel. The write-up stated that to call would be like calling your "best friend." It was our first trip to Washington, and the friendliness and concern shown by Marilyn Matthews of the Washington, D.C., Central Reservation Center was most gratifying. She not only found us the best accommodations for our needs, but answered many of our questions about the city. The service is free, and we can highly recommend it. The address is 1737 De Sales St. N.W., ZIP 20036, phone (800)
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