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Jack Katz

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March 5, 1989 | Robert H. Frank, Frank, an economics professor at Cornell University, is the author of "Passions Within Reason: The Strategic Role of the Emotions" (W. W. Norton)
John Allen, a career stickup man from a black ghetto in Washington had this to say about why he chose stickup over safer, more lucrative forms of crime: "For a man, pimping is a good way of making money, but the fastest way is narcotics, and the safest and best way of all is numbers. Even though my whores were making a lot of money, I just didn't like pimping that much. It ain't my style. . . . I missed stickup quite a bit. . . .
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May 7, 2000 | JONATHAN REE, Jonathan Ree is the author of "I See a Voice: A Philosophical History of Deafness, Language and the Senses" (Metropolitan Books). He teaches philosophy at Middlesex University in England
The weather was beautiful last Sunday--springtime touched with summer warmth. I got up early and sat outside by the budding magnolia, laptop on my knees, gliding through an assignment that had been baffling me for weeks. I felt I deserved my sociable lunch followed by a trip to a plant nursery to buy old-fashioned wallflowers. Later I would look over my morning's work and make final adjustments. A perfect day. In the evening I switched the computer back on.
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NEWS
December 28, 1988 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Jack Katz is convinced that crime pays--and that it can be fun too. The psychological rewards of crime may be so rich--if only temporarily--that nickel-and-dime robberies, penny-ante shoplifting and even murder are worth the risks, according to the UCLA sociologist, who has published an unconventional new study of criminal behavior that is attracting wide attention. Katz's "Seductions of Crime: Moral and Sensual Attractions in Doing Evil" (Basic Books: $19.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1994 | Jack Katz and Estela Lopez, Gang disturbances forced the early closure of the Fiesta Broadway on May 1, resulting in 18 injuries and 14 arrests. The incident raises the issue of whether such gatherings are viable. In separate interviews, free-lance writer Catherine Gewertz talked to Jack Katz, a UCLA sociology professor who studies deviant behavior and crime, and Estela Lopez, executive director of Miracle On Broadway Corp., the nonprofit firm that co-sponsored the fiesta. Here are their views: and
Question: What were the main things that went wrong at the fiesta? Lopez: Not in any order: On that day, Broadway attracted lots of young people affiliated with gangs. This has not happened before. Also this year, for the first time there was one stage (at 4th and Spring streets) where the entertainment was unfortunately the type of music attractive to those sectors of our community that are violence prone. Also the alcohol was available just outside the perimeter of the festival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1994 | Jack Katz and Estela Lopez, Gang disturbances forced the early closure of the Fiesta Broadway on May 1, resulting in 18 injuries and 14 arrests. The incident raises the issue of whether such gatherings are viable. In separate interviews, free-lance writer Catherine Gewertz talked to Jack Katz, a UCLA sociology professor who studies deviant behavior and crime, and Estela Lopez, executive director of Miracle On Broadway Corp., the nonprofit firm that co-sponsored the fiesta. Here are their views: and
Question: What were the main things that went wrong at the fiesta? Lopez: Not in any order: On that day, Broadway attracted lots of young people affiliated with gangs. This has not happened before. Also this year, for the first time there was one stage (at 4th and Spring streets) where the entertainment was unfortunately the type of music attractive to those sectors of our community that are violence prone. Also the alcohol was available just outside the perimeter of the festival.
BOOKS
May 7, 2000 | JONATHAN REE, Jonathan Ree is the author of "I See a Voice: A Philosophical History of Deafness, Language and the Senses" (Metropolitan Books). He teaches philosophy at Middlesex University in England
The weather was beautiful last Sunday--springtime touched with summer warmth. I got up early and sat outside by the budding magnolia, laptop on my knees, gliding through an assignment that had been baffling me for weeks. I felt I deserved my sociable lunch followed by a trip to a plant nursery to buy old-fashioned wallflowers. Later I would look over my morning's work and make final adjustments. A perfect day. In the evening I switched the computer back on.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1989
I am appalled by "The Seductions of Crime" (by Garry Abrams, Dec. 28). It takes a UCLA sociologist, Jack Katz, to discover that criminals are uncompetitive, suffer from inferiority complexes and have a strong desire to assert themselves? What else is new? Sorry about all the trees that had to die to permit these "revolutionary" observations to be printed. JUERGEN STENGEL Riverside
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1986 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
Throughout her campaign for mayor, Maureen O'Connor said she thought the $50,000 salary for mayor was satisfactory. So adequate, in fact, that she promised not to take the $5,000 raise that was due as part of a general wage increase for the mayor and City Council. Now, however, O'Connor is running into a problem. It's not that she wants to go back on her promise. It's that some members of the City Council, such as Mike Gotch, want to keep the mayor's salary at the new level of $55,000 a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1986 | GLENN F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
Mavourneen O'Connor may continue working out of a City Hall office as a volunteer in charge of protocol matters for her twin sister, San Diego Mayor Maureen O'Connor, without having to disclose her financial holdings, the city attorney's office ruled Tuesday. Volunteers such as the mayor's twin sister who lack "decision-making or influence-bearing authority" are not required to file annual economic interest forms, according to a seven-page opinion written by Chief Deputy City Atty. Jack Katz.
BOOKS
March 5, 1989 | Robert H. Frank, Frank, an economics professor at Cornell University, is the author of "Passions Within Reason: The Strategic Role of the Emotions" (W. W. Norton)
John Allen, a career stickup man from a black ghetto in Washington had this to say about why he chose stickup over safer, more lucrative forms of crime: "For a man, pimping is a good way of making money, but the fastest way is narcotics, and the safest and best way of all is numbers. Even though my whores were making a lot of money, I just didn't like pimping that much. It ain't my style. . . . I missed stickup quite a bit. . . .
NEWS
December 28, 1988 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Jack Katz is convinced that crime pays--and that it can be fun too. The psychological rewards of crime may be so rich--if only temporarily--that nickel-and-dime robberies, penny-ante shoplifting and even murder are worth the risks, according to the UCLA sociologist, who has published an unconventional new study of criminal behavior that is attracting wide attention. Katz's "Seductions of Crime: Moral and Sensual Attractions in Doing Evil" (Basic Books: $19.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1989 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
The City Council's Rules Committee on Wednesday asked City Atty. John Witt and City Clerk Charles Abdelnour to devise a system that lets council members know of potential conflicts of interest before they vote. San Diego City Council members have complained for months that they and their staffs lack the legal knowledge to determine when they can vote on contracts, development projects and bids. "We are not that sophisticated about the law," said Mayor Maureen O'Connor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1987 | NANCY RAY, Times Staff Writer
San Diego Mayor Maureen O'Connor plans to discuss publicly the pay increases she recommended for five top city officials after City Council members discovered they had inadvertently voted to grant the raises. The council voted unanimously to grant the raises, ranging from 5% to 10%, as part of a voluminous ordinance setting salaries for thousands of city employees, including O'Connor's recommended increases for the city manager, city attorney, city clerk, auditor and planning director.
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