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Jack Kennedy

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November 4, 1988 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
American Expose: Who Murdered Journalism? The 25th anniversary of President Kennedy's assassination doesn't arrive until Nov. 22. But television's observance of that grim event is almost monthlong, ranging from the appealingly nostalgic "JFK: In His Own Words" at 10 p.m. Sunday on cable's HBO to syndicated columnist Jack Anderson's tawdry and strident "American Expose: Who Killed J.F.K.?," which aired Wednesday night on KCOP-TV Channel 13. How convenient for some in TV that J.F.K.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | August Brown
About a year ago, the musician Jack Kennedy was on a tour, in a manner of speaking. The local disco-pop antagonist rode Greyhound buses making Alan Lomax-style field recordings of amateur musicians along the byways of America. He'd tape their performances and interview them for his podcast "Night Bus Radio," a low-fi documentary series sponsored by the streaming service SoundCloud. "That's where I learned how interesting everybody really is," Kennedy said, kicking back beneath the kitschy goth-erotica paintings in the Echo Park performance space Echoes Under Sunset.
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NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
DANVILLE, Ky. -- There is, let's face it, just one truly memorable moment in the annals of vice presidential debates. That was in 1988, when Sen. Lloyd Bentsen told Sen. Dan Quayle that the younger man was no John F. Kennedy. As we all know, that moment -- perhaps the all-time zinger in any debate -- is why Bentsen went on to a distinguished career as vice president under President Michael Dukakis. Or not. Consider the circumstances: A young member of Congress, who looked even younger than his 40-something years, going up against a vastly more experienced candidate, a longtime member of the Senate in his 60s. If that sounds a lot like Rep. Paul Ryan and Vice President Joe Biden ... well, it's only a partially apt comparison.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
DANVILLE, Ky. -- There is, let's face it, just one truly memorable moment in the annals of vice presidential debates. That was in 1988, when Sen. Lloyd Bentsen told Sen. Dan Quayle that the younger man was no John F. Kennedy. As we all know, that moment -- perhaps the all-time zinger in any debate -- is why Bentsen went on to a distinguished career as vice president under President Michael Dukakis. Or not. Consider the circumstances: A young member of Congress, who looked even younger than his 40-something years, going up against a vastly more experienced candidate, a longtime member of the Senate in his 60s. If that sounds a lot like Rep. Paul Ryan and Vice President Joe Biden ... well, it's only a partially apt comparison.
NEWS
October 9, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
"You're no Jack Kennedy," the most telling line uttered by Lloyd Bentsen in his vice presidential debate with Dan Quayle, grew out of a warm-up session with Rep. Dennis E. Eckart (D-Ohio) playing Quayle, U.S. News & World Report says in its issue dated Oct. 17. The magazine quoted Eckart as saying he studied available videotapes of Quayle speeches and decided that the Indiana senator was setting himself up as a "Republican John Kennedy."
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
Republican Sen. Dan Quayle, clashing with Sen. Lloyd Bentsen on Wednesday in a vice presidential debate that focused on Quayle's qualifications to be President, compared himself to former President John F. Kennedy and insisted that, if necessary, he would be prepared to assume the presidency. The 41-year-old Quayle said age alone was not the only measure of fitness for the Oval Office.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By James Rainey
The first rule in picking a vice presidential candidate may be “do no harm.” As Mitt Romney prepares to roll out his pick for No. 2, it's not a bad time to recall all that can go wrong. VP choices can run off the rails from a candidate's native flaws, but at least as often because the teams that nominate them fail to thoroughly investigate for shortcomings or to prepare No. 2 for the withering odyssey of the modern campaign. Here are the six most problematic vice presidential nominations of the last six decades, ranked in reverse order of the least to the most problematic, for the VP pick and the ticket they helped form: 6. Adm. James Stockdale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1988
Telling Quayle that he was no Jack Kennedy was not a cheap shot. If Bentsen had added, ". . . But you are somewhat reminiscent of Spiro Agnew," that might be construed as a cheap shot. NEWTON WINTERS Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001
It was an exchange reminiscent of Lloyd Bentsen's put-down of Dan Quayle in 1988, when he said "I knew Jack Kennedy . . . you are no Jack Kennedy." The latest Tom Hayden-Jack Weiss tiff in the 5th Council District race involves who is more representative of the Robert F. Kennedy legacy.
NEWS
August 26, 1996 | CONNIE KOENENN
Were Jack and Jackie really in love when they married in 1953? Did Jackie know about Jack's womanizing? Such gossipy subjects are examined in two new books: "All Too Human: The Love Story of Jack and Jackie Kennedy," by Edward Klein (Pocket Books), and "Jack and Jackie: Portrait of an American Marriage," by Christopher Andersen (William Morrow). Each book purports to reveal new insight into the true nature of the planet's most celebrated couple. Some samples: Was Jack in love with Jackie?
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By James Rainey
The first rule in picking a vice presidential candidate may be “do no harm.” As Mitt Romney prepares to roll out his pick for No. 2, it's not a bad time to recall all that can go wrong. VP choices can run off the rails from a candidate's native flaws, but at least as often because the teams that nominate them fail to thoroughly investigate for shortcomings or to prepare No. 2 for the withering odyssey of the modern campaign. Here are the six most problematic vice presidential nominations of the last six decades, ranked in reverse order of the least to the most problematic, for the VP pick and the ticket they helped form: 6. Adm. James Stockdale.
BOOKS
May 23, 2004 | Gary Indiana, Gary Indiana is the author of several novels, including "Do Everything in the Dark."
If there is little earth-rattlingly new to say about Jack and Jackie Kennedy, their private lives, their restive travels together and separately, the international aristocrats, butchering dictators, arms dealers, piratical shipping magnates, aging debutantes, desiccated diplomats, dress designers, fashionable hairdressers and antiques experts they cultivated along with the obligatory politicians, reporters and other useful and often loathed Washington insiders, Sally Bedell Smith at least says
NATIONAL
March 4, 2004 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Jim Johnson's first political activity was licking envelopes for Hubert Humphrey's 1948 Senate campaign. He was 4 years old. Now, 56 years later, after working with politicians from Edmund S. Muskie to Walter F. Mondale, after stints as head of Fannie Mae, the Kennedy Center and the Brookings Institution, Johnson has yet another role in politics as leader of Sen. John F. Kerry's effort to select a running mate. He has been there before.
NEWS
December 21, 2001 | ZACHARY KARABELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After more than four decades, the Kennedy industry is as strong as ever. Every year, publishers issue dozens of books on the Kennedy clan, and these past months have been no exception. Clearly, there is a hard core of Kennedy book devotees, much like there is a solid niche audience for books on each day of each battle of the Civil War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001
It was an exchange reminiscent of Lloyd Bentsen's put-down of Dan Quayle in 1988, when he said "I knew Jack Kennedy . . . you are no Jack Kennedy." The latest Tom Hayden-Jack Weiss tiff in the 5th Council District race involves who is more representative of the Robert F. Kennedy legacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2001 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Believe all of it at your own risk. But "Jackie, Ethel, Joan: Women of Camelot" is serviceable melodrama and a heckuva good cry. As was much of the history it tells. This NBC two-parter is drawn from J. Randy Taraborrelli's book of the same title, covering a 27-year period ending in 1980.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2000 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, Patrick Goldstein is a Times staff writer. His e-mail address is Patrick.Goldstein@latimes.com
William Gargan, star of "Martin Kane, Private Eye," a popular early '50s TV detective show, knew who was staying upstairs in the penthouse suite of a three-story apartment building at 522 N. Rossmore Ave. Gargan and his wife, Mary, had been sworn to secrecy not to reveal his identity. But as they sat watching the roll call at the 1960 Democratic National Convention, they had a surprise visit from their surreptitious neighbor. Sen. John F.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2000 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, Patrick Goldstein is a Times staff writer. His e-mail address is Patrick.Goldstein@latimes.com
William Gargan, star of "Martin Kane, Private Eye," a popular early '50s TV detective show, knew who was staying upstairs in the penthouse suite of a three-story apartment building at 522 N. Rossmore Ave. Gargan and his wife, Mary, had been sworn to secrecy not to reveal his identity. But as they sat watching the roll call at the 1960 Democratic National Convention, they had a surprise visit from their surreptitious neighbor. Sen. John F.
BOOKS
December 28, 1997 | EDWARD JAY EPSTEIN, Edward Jay Epstein is the author of numerous books, including "Dossier: The Secret History of Armand Hammer." He is currently writing a book about Hollywood
In his new book, "The Dark Side of Camelot," Seymour M. Hersh, a prize-winning investigative reporter, attempts to radically revise the history of John F. Kennedy. Soon after an assassin's bullets cut short the JFK presidency, books by his former aides and speech writers, notably "A Thousand Days" by Arthur Schlesinger Jr.
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