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Jack Kerouac

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September 6, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the New Criterion this week, Bruce Bawer recycles the classic conservative screed against the Beats by way of lamenting the publication of Jack Kerouac's collected poetry by the Library of America. It's an odd piece, not least because “Collected Poems” came out a year ago, but also because of how completely Bawer misses the point. “[P]erhaps the best way to try to get through Kerouac's poems,” he complains, “is to approach them not as literary texts but as private ramblings of the sort you might find in the files of a psych ward.” A line or two later, he reminds us that “a voyeuristic frisson is not the same as an aesthetic experience.” Well, yes, of course ... but to dismiss Kerouac's poetry through the lens of voyeurism (or worse, psychosis)
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TRAVEL
March 21, 2014 | By Pico Iyer
SAN FRANCISCO - To get to one of the spiritual centers of San Francisco - a perfect microcosm of the city of evergreen revolutions - turn left after the high-rising office buildings downtown, saunter past Francis Ford Coppola's emerald-shaded seven-story American Zoetrope mock pagoda and halt just past the spot where Columbus Avenue meets Jack Kerouac Alley. Or perhaps approach the official historical landmark by way of Grant Avenue, at the heart of San Francisco's Chinatown, wander past a long line of slightly kitschy tourist shops displaying quotes from Lao Tse and Jimi Hendrix and try to ignore the eco-conscious green Hello Kittys in store windows.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2010 | By Lynell George
There are those who return to Jack Kerouac just to get lost in the ride. Not across lonesome America but in the serpentine locomotion of his prose. It's the music of the page: long blasts of blue-streak narrative that don't yield to periods, semicolons, commas; mile-long sentences that twist onto side-road tangents before -- in their best moments -- leading to a clear, untrammeled epiphany. Kerouac's ear was tuned to a different set of rules: that herky-jerk flow, the misplaced modifier mining something different, something else.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Jim Ruland
William S. Burroughs' "Naked Lunch" stands with Jack Kerouac's "On the Road" and Allen Ginsburg's "Howl" as the seminal texts of the Beat Generation. With its harrowing scenes of junkie depravity, its view of postwar America was the most extreme of all the Beats. Yet few American literary figures have enjoyed more second acts than Burroughs. He was spokesman for the countercultural movement in the '70s, begrudgingly bore the label Godfather of Punk in the '80s, and was a spoken-word performer and visual artist until his death in 1997.
NEWS
July 3, 2003 | From Associated Press
Johnson's Corner, the Colorado gas station and eatery described in Jack Kerouac's "On the Road," has been moved from the spot where the Beat poet found it. The concrete, 1937 Art Deco structure, designed by Denver architect Eugene Groves, is now in Prospect New Town, a development about a mile south of its former location on Main Street in Longmont. Kerouac describes taking a nap under a tree at a gas station fitting Johnson's Corner's description and then ordering a creamy milkshake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1987
I am fascinated by the enduring power of the celebration of life that was Jack Kerouac's vision. His continued condemnation by critics is strong testimony to that vision. Kerouac painted a vivid word picture of an America evolving in ways that were--and still are--unsettling to those with an idyllic dream of a secure and unchanging nation. It's ironic that in his lifetime he was criticized for being a "typist" and a "reporter"; now he and Ginsberg are being denounced for having consciously helped to shape an entire generation's disaffection.
BOOKS
June 21, 1992
In his jests serious, in his murders victim, or which, is God? Who began before non-existence's dependence on existence, Who came before the chicken and the egg Who started out enormous Light the dark brilliance of the Mystery for all good hearts to shroud inside and keep their understanding sympathy intact as Beethoven's courageous slow sigh. In his atrocities victim? In his jests damned? In his damnation damnation?
BOOKS
October 21, 1990 | JOHN ESPEY
There are classics and classics. One person's classic is another person's cult, just as one age's classic may become the next age's cliche. So while Jack Kerouac is certainly not everyone's "classic," "On the Road" (1957) is surely "the" novel of the late '50s and the '60s. And the three vinyl recordings made by Kerouac are in one sense already beyond being classics, if that is possible. For years they have been virtually unobtainable.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Beats are all over the movies lately -- there was "On the Road" late last year, October will bring "Kill Your Darlings," and then comes "Big Sur," which is set to open in November. The official "Big Sur" trailer is above. The movie is based on "Big Sur," the 1962 novel by Jack Kerouac. In it, Kerouac's alter ego, Jack Duluoz, retreats to a rustic cabin on the coast of Northern California in an effort to get a grip on a life that's spun out of control -- the freedom of "On the Road" has been dampened by fame, alcohol and the pressures of adulthood.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Robert Abele
Writer-director Michael Polish's adaptation of Jack Kerouac's autobiographical novel "Big Sur" - chronicling the "On the Road" author's addiction-fueled post-fame crack-up - is a somber peculiarity among the recent glut of Beat-centric movies. Although no less fawning and indulgent about its self-centered subject, played by Jean-Marc Barr (who also narrates, run-on style), the muted emptiness of the ill-fated sojourn wills its way toward something like existential meaningfulness.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Earlier this week, I saw Michael Polish's film adaptation of Jack Kerouac's 1962 novel “Big Sur,” which opens Friday. The book is one of my favorites: dark, brooding, the flip side of the Beat road legend, a story of isolation and spiritual despair. In it, we confront Kerouac's alter ego, Jack Duluoz, as he tries to reconnect with himself at a quiet cabin in Bixby Canyon. But he is already too far gone in his dissolution (Kerouac died in 1969, at age 47, of an esophageal hemorrhage, what his biographer Gerald Nicosia described as a “classic drunkard's death”)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
The superhero origin story has become popular in the last few years, so it makes sense the form might also spread to stories outside the comic-book genre - like Beat generation writers. The new film "Kill Your Darlings" tells the tale of how before they were Ginsberg, Kerouac and Burroughs, they were just Allen, Jack and William, young men settling into the paths that would lead them to the literary landmarks of "Howl," "On the Road" and "Naked Lunch," respectively. The drama - starring Daniel Radcliffe, Dane DeHaan and Michael C. Hall - focuses on 1943 and 1944, when the three were brought together by Lucien Carr, who surrounded himself with artists, creativity and culture and has been described as both "muse" and "midwife" to the Beats.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Jack Kerouac's encounter with a "Mexican girl" he calls Teresa, or Terry, takes up about 20 pages of his classic 1957 novel "On the Road. " He's at a bus station in Bakersfield when he first catches a glimpse of Terry, "the cutest little Mexican girl in slacks," with hair that was "long and lustrous black" and eyes that were "great big blue things with timidities inside. " Kerouac ends up spending two weeks with her. The point of the young writer's life is to keep moving, and when Kerouac takes one last look at Terry as he leaves California on his way back to New York, he knows he'll never see her again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
If proof was needed that opposites attract, the loves of Carolyn Cassady's life would more than make the case. The daughter of a biochemistry professor and an English teacher with strict, Victorian values, she grew up in the 1940s envisioning a traditional marriage with children and a steady husband to keep them in comfort. What she chose, however, was marriage to Neal Cassady, the fast-talking, hard-living, womanizing wanderer who would be immortalized as Dean Moriarty in "On the Road," Jack Kerouac's 1957 novel that celebrated nonconformity in a rigidly conformist era with its depictions of sexual freedom, drugs and other revelry on the open road.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Beats are all over the movies lately -- there was "On the Road" late last year, October will bring "Kill Your Darlings," and then comes "Big Sur," which is set to open in November. The official "Big Sur" trailer is above. The movie is based on "Big Sur," the 1962 novel by Jack Kerouac. In it, Kerouac's alter ego, Jack Duluoz, retreats to a rustic cabin on the coast of Northern California in an effort to get a grip on a life that's spun out of control -- the freedom of "On the Road" has been dampened by fame, alcohol and the pressures of adulthood.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the New Criterion this week, Bruce Bawer recycles the classic conservative screed against the Beats by way of lamenting the publication of Jack Kerouac's collected poetry by the Library of America. It's an odd piece, not least because “Collected Poems” came out a year ago, but also because of how completely Bawer misses the point. “[P]erhaps the best way to try to get through Kerouac's poems,” he complains, “is to approach them not as literary texts but as private ramblings of the sort you might find in the files of a psych ward.” A line or two later, he reminds us that “a voyeuristic frisson is not the same as an aesthetic experience.” Well, yes, of course ... but to dismiss Kerouac's poetry through the lens of voyeurism (or worse, psychosis)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2013 | By Diana Marcum
Until three years ago, Bea Kozera, who died this month at age 92, did not know she played a role in American literature. In 1947 she had an affair with a man she met on a Greyhound bus leaving Bakersfield. He was Jack Kerouac, who would go on to write "On the Road," a book that defined a generation rebelling against conformity. The Beat Generation would help fuel the social upheavals of the '60s. She was the real-life woman behind "Terry, the Mexican girl," a character in the novel and a pivotal part of his career.
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