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Jack Kevorkian

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NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots Blog
Dr. Jack Kevorkian, the assisted-suicide activist who came to be known as "Dr. Death," died early Friday in an intensive care unit at a Michigan hospital.  He was 83 years old, and suffered a pulmonary thrombosis while hospitalized for kidney problems and pneumonia. Kevorkian's illness was relatively brief, and assisted suicide apparently was not a factor.  But the former pathologist aided at least 130 people in bringing an end to their lives -- including victims of debilitating and incurable diseases like Alzheimer's and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In 1999, two years after the release of his final novel, “Timequake,” Kurt Vonnegut put out a small book called “God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian,” in which he imagined himself as the afterlife reporter for a New York radio station, using Jack Kevorkian's suicide machine to produce near-death experiences that would take him to a no man's land just outside the gates of heaven, where he would interview luminaries who had slipped the mortal coil....
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
He was known as Dr. Death, a Michigan physician who helped his patients kill themselves. In doing so, Jack Kevorkian inflamed a nationwide debate in the 1990s over a terminally ill patient's right to die. And he served eight years in prison for second-degree murder for administering the lethal injection rather than helping the patient do it himself. Kevorkian began his crusade mindful of his own mortality. "You don't know what will happen when you get older," he said in a 1998 interview with "60 Minutes.
OPINION
June 12, 2011 | By Betty Rollin
In 1982, when I helped my mother die, Jack Kevorkian wasn't yet on the scene. Within a few years he was, noisily assisting terminally ill people who wanted to die. My mother was dying of ovarian cancer, but in her view, not fast enough. She was 76, and one afternoon she put it to me: "I'm not afraid to die, but I am afraid of what this illness is doing to me. There's nothing but nausea and pain. There's no point in a slow death. I've got to end this. " I loved my mother and didn't want her to die, but because I loved her, I helped her. That is, my husband and I did research.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
After more than eight years behind bars for murder, an ailing Jack Kevorkian will be paroled in June on a promise not to help anyone else commit suicide, prison officials said in Lansing. Corrections Department spokesman Russ Marlan said the parole board took the 78-year-old Kevorkian's declining health into consideration, along with the question of whether the former pathologist would be a danger to society.
OPINION
June 12, 2011 | By Betty Rollin
In 1982, when I helped my mother die, Jack Kevorkian wasn't yet on the scene. Within a few years he was, noisily assisting terminally ill people who wanted to die. My mother was dying of ovarian cancer, but in her view, not fast enough. She was 76, and one afternoon she put it to me: "I'm not afraid to die, but I am afraid of what this illness is doing to me. There's nothing but nausea and pain. There's no point in a slow death. I've got to end this. " I loved my mother and didn't want her to die, but because I loved her, I helped her. That is, my husband and I did research.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2010 | By David Ferrell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At the crux of the lingering debate over Dr. Jack Kevorkian is an unresolved question of character: What kind of guy would devote his life to helping other people die? Was he a compassionate visionary, fighting to end the suffering of the ill, or was there something darkly twisted about a man who defied the law and risked years in prison as he pushed the death toll well beyond 100? That sort of inscrutable extremism proved irresistible to Al Pacino and Barry Levinson. "We had talked about doing this kind of story, this kind of person ?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2004 | From Associated Press
Oscar-winning director Barbara Kopple plans a film on assisted-suicide advocate Jack Kevorkian. The film will be based on a 300-page unpublished manuscript by Michigan authors and Kevorkian friends Neal Nicol and Harry Wylie. Kopple and producer Steve Jones say they plan to begin shooting in Michigan by early 2005. "We're at the beginning, just sort of starting to let this project seep into our souls," Kopple, who won documentary Oscars for "Harlan County, U.S.A."
NEWS
March 11, 1996 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it were possible to euthanize a telephone, Diane Hackett would pull the plug today. Her home phone number, it turns out, used to be the number of Jack Kevorkian. Early in his career as the nation's most enthusiastic assister of suicides, Kevorkian had his home number listed in all the Detroit-area directories.
OPINION
December 12, 1993 | Jack Lessenberry, Jack Lessenberry, former national editor of the Detroit News, is writing a book about Kevorkian. He interviewed the doctor in his Oakland County jail cell.
"This is what I want," Dr. Jack Kevorkian said on Nov. 5, when he realized that he was going to end up in jail as a result of assisting a suicide, one of 19 he had witnessed since connecting Janet Adkins to his suicide machine--the "Mercitron"--on June 4, 1990. He was wrong. Three days later, an opponent who said he was sick of Kevorkian's antics paid the bail the physician had refused to surrender.
OPINION
June 7, 2011
30 years of AIDS Re "A mixed picture of AIDS at 30," June 5 In October 1981, my father had heart surgery; he recovered quickly and began a healthier life. At the time he was a very successful attorney in Los Angeles. Three years later he started to get sick and had to stop working. Not one doctor knew what was wrong or how to help him. He died in 1987 because of the transfusion of HIV-tainted blood during his surgery. My mother lied to her friends and told them he died of cancer because of the stigma of AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
He was known as Dr. Death, a Michigan physician who helped his patients kill themselves. In doing so, Jack Kevorkian inflamed a nationwide debate in the 1990s over a terminally ill patient's right to die. And he served eight years in prison for second-degree murder for administering the lethal injection rather than helping the patient do it himself. Kevorkian began his crusade mindful of his own mortality. "You don't know what will happen when you get older," he said in a 1998 interview with "60 Minutes.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots Blog
Dr. Jack Kevorkian, the assisted-suicide activist who came to be known as "Dr. Death," died early Friday in an intensive care unit at a Michigan hospital.  He was 83 years old, and suffered a pulmonary thrombosis while hospitalized for kidney problems and pneumonia. Kevorkian's illness was relatively brief, and assisted suicide apparently was not a factor.  But the former pathologist aided at least 130 people in bringing an end to their lives -- including victims of debilitating and incurable diseases like Alzheimer's and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2011 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from El Cajon, Calif. -- Sharlotte Hydorn peddles a product touted for its deadly simplicity. Inside her butterfly-decorated boxes are clear plastic bags and medical-grade tubing. A customer places the bag over his head, connects the tubing from the bag to a helium tank, turns the valve and breathes. The so-called suicide kit asphyxiates a customer within minutes. Orders come from all over the world, from people young and old, depressed and terminally ill. "People commit suicide by jumping out of windows and buildings, and hanging themselves," said the 91-year-old former elementary school science teacher.
NATIONAL
February 20, 2011 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
Nobody disputes that Kenneth Minor held the knife that ripped into the chest of Jeffrey Locker in July 2009 as Locker, a motivational speaker, sat in his car with his hands tied behind his back. Locker, 52, who appeared to have a good life — a loving wife, three children, a nice home in a comfortable suburb — died that night, slumped behind the wheel of his shiny black Dodge in what was thought to be a vicious murder and robbery. But jurors hearing the case that opened last week in New York must decide whether Minor was a coldblooded killer or a mere tool in an extraordinary plan by Locker to arrange his own murder — a claim that sounds outlandish, except that prosecutors have conceded much of it is true.
NEWS
June 16, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
There were many reasons to rave about HBO's recent biopic "You Don't Know Jack." Following close on the heels of "Temple Grandin," it offered more proof that you can see better biopics on HBO than you can in the theater — who would have thought the story of Jack Kevorkian, the euthanasia activist turned controversy celebrity, would have made for such a rich and moving story? Director Barry Levinson, for one, and star Al Pacino for another. Pacino was the major recipient of the general critical praise — instead of the loud scenery-chewing he has lately become known for, the star wore understatement like one of Kevorkian's cardigans, taking a figure who had become a caricature and making him heartbreakingly, mind-bendingly real.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Michigan doctor who envisioned establishing a nationwide network of suicide clinics and who admitted helping three women kill themselves was arrested Wednesday on murder charges stemming from two assisted suicides. Jack Kevorkian, the former pathologist known as "Dr. Death" for his advocacy of physician-assisted suicide, was charged with two counts of murder and one count of delivery of a controlled substance for his role in assisting the deaths of two chronically ill women in October.
NEWS
July 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
After four years of watching Dr. Jack Kevorkian take part in dozens of suicides, the Michigan Legislature has passed a bill aimed at stopping him. It approved a ban Thursday on assisted suicide, and Gov. John Engler said he will sign it. Effective Sept. 1, the legislation would make assisted suicide a crime punishable by up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Kevorkian reacted defiantly to the passage of the bill. "Don't you know you cannot legislate morality?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2010 | By David Ferrell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At the crux of the lingering debate over Dr. Jack Kevorkian is an unresolved question of character: What kind of guy would devote his life to helping other people die? Was he a compassionate visionary, fighting to end the suffering of the ill, or was there something darkly twisted about a man who defied the law and risked years in prison as he pushed the death toll well beyond 100? That sort of inscrutable extremism proved irresistible to Al Pacino and Barry Levinson. "We had talked about doing this kind of story, this kind of person ?
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