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Jack Kilby

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October 11, 2000 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I don't know why nobody had seen it before," Jack Kilby said Tuesday of the flash of insight he experienced in 1958, a few weeks after starting work at Texas Instruments. His insight--that electrical components such as transistors, resistors and capacitors could all be manufactured out of the same material, silicon, and could therefore be etched on a single chip of the material--helped launch a trillion-dollar industry and revolutionized daily life around the world.
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NEWS
October 11, 2000 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I don't know why nobody had seen it before," Jack Kilby said Tuesday of the flash of insight he experienced in 1958, a few weeks after starting work at Texas Instruments. His insight--that electrical components such as transistors, resistors and capacitors could all be manufactured out of the same material, silicon, and could therefore be etched on a single chip of the material--helped launch a trillion-dollar industry and revolutionized daily life around the world.
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NEWS
October 25, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the summer of 1948, a tiny electronic device called a transistor--the size of a pencil eraser--was presented to the world at a press conference at the headquarters of Bell Laboratories in New York City. It wasn't much of a press conference and it failed to create a buzz over this invention. Even the hometown paper, the New York Times, managed only a few paragraphs on the event in a column about radio news, giving top billing that day to the radio show "Our Miss Brooks."
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the summer of 1948, a tiny electronic device called a transistor--the size of a pencil eraser--was presented to the world at a press conference at the headquarters of Bell Laboratories in New York City. It wasn't much of a press conference and it failed to create a buzz over this invention. Even the hometown paper, the New York Times, managed only a few paragraphs on the event in a column about radio news, giving top billing that day to the radio show "Our Miss Brooks."
BUSINESS
April 21, 1988
Jack S. Kilby, inventor of the integrated circuit and holder of more than 50 patents, has joined the Wyle Laboratories board of directors. The Wyle board has been expanded to 12 members.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a decision that could reignite concern over Japan's willingness to protect American inventions, a Japanese court ruled Wednesday that computer chips made by Japan's Fujitsu Ltd. don't infringe on Texas Instruments' basic semiconductor patent. The Tokyo District Court said Fujitsu's most advanced memory chips are made with a different method than the one described in TI's pioneering patent, and thus rejected TI's request for an injunction blocking Fujitsu from manufacturing the chips.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gilbert Hyatt, a slender, bearded engineer, says he would never shoot the two rifles that are mounted over the fireplace in his modest, two-story home on a quiet La Palma cul-de-sac. But he is not afraid to take steady, dead aim when it is necessary to get what is rightfully his. "I'm a little guy up against the big guys," Hyatt, 52, said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2005 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Jack Kilby, the soft-spoken, 6-foot-6 engineer whose invention of the integrated circuit won him the Nobel Prize and launched the digital revolution, died Monday. He was 81. Kilby died of cancer at his home in Dallas, according to Texas Instruments, where he worked for most of his career. Kilby's research for Texas Instruments in 1958 led to the computer chip, which spawned a trillion-dollar global industry and transformed the way people live and work.
OPINION
December 15, 2007 | Saswato R. Das, Saswato R. Das writes about physics and astronomy.
A little electronic device that triggered one of the most dramatic technological explosions in history turns 60 on Sunday. The humble transistor and its descendant, the semiconductor chip, which made the digital revolution possible, today touch nearly every facet of our lives. All around us, billions upon billions of transistors are quietly at work in computers, cellphones, radios, TVs, printers, copiers, CD players, cars -- in anything with electronics in it.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ and CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Robert N. Noyce, a modern-day Thomas Edison who helped usher in the Computer Age by co-inventing the semiconductor and later led an effort to restore America's leadership in computer chips, died Sunday morning of a heart attack. He was 62. The Silicon Valley pioneer was stricken at his home in Austin, Tex., and was rushed to Seton Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead minutes after his arrival, according to a hospital spokesman.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1995 | GARY CHAPMAN
In 1962, Thomas S. Kuhn, a Princeton University historian of science, threw the scientific community into upheaval with the publication of his landmark book "The Structure of Scientific Revolutions." Kuhn argued that the history of science was not, as previously believed, one of uninterrupted incremental progress building on all other advances, but rather was punctuated by conceptual "revolutions" that were essentially the blue-sky insights of specific individuals.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Where does the U.S. electronics industry go from here, following the collapse of U.S. Memories, a proposed $350-million joint venture of the nation's biggest computer and semiconductor companies to produce basic memory chips? The idea behind U.S.
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