Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJack Kramer
IN THE NEWS

Jack Kramer

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
June 15, 1990
Jack Kramer, winner of the U.S. tennis championships in 1946 and '47 and Wimbledon in 1947, will be honored during the Volvo Tennis/Los Angeles tournament July 28-Aug. 5.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
November 16, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
Bob Kramer spoke of the loss he is about to suffer, admitting he has a hole in his heart. He wasn't grieving a child or a parent, just a best friend. Kramer is director of a tennis tournament that will be no more. The Los Angeles men's tennis event that has been held each summer at UCLA since 1984 will be held next summer in Bogota, Colombia. That's a pretty long commute for loyal fans and ticket buyers around Westwood. For Kramer, and his sanctioning Southern California Tennis Assn., this is much more than just a business sale.
Advertisement
SPORTS
December 31, 1994
I was incensed at Thomas Bonk's write-up of Ivan Lendl's career. Here we have the retirement of one of the 10 greats of the game and all he can do is knock the man. A failure to win Wimbledon hardly makes Lendl's a flawed career, or tragic, as Jack Kramer would have it. Lendl won eight Grand Slam events in seven years: Can (Jimmy) Connors, (John) McEnroe or Kramer make that claim? Bonk describes Lendl as a dour man with a "grating personality that drew few fans his way." I disagree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2009 | Bill Dwyre
Jack Kramer, a world-renowned tennis player in the 1940s and early '50s and a well-known businessman and tennis promoter in Southern California for more 60 years, died late Saturday night at his home in Los Angeles. He was 88. The cause of death was a soft tissue cancer that was diagnosed in July. Kramer, the No. 1 player in the world for much of the late 1940s, won the Wimbledon men's singles title in 1947 and the men's U.S. Championships, the forerunner of the U.S. Open, in 1946 and '47. He also won seven other Grand Slam titles in doubles, all at Wimbledon or the U.S. Championships.
SPORTS
November 16, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
Bob Kramer spoke of the loss he is about to suffer, admitting he has a hole in his heart. He wasn't grieving a child or a parent, just a best friend. Kramer is director of a tennis tournament that will be no more. The Los Angeles men's tennis event that has been held each summer at UCLA since 1984 will be held next summer in Bogota, Colombia. That's a pretty long commute for loyal fans and ticket buyers around Westwood. For Kramer, and his sanctioning Southern California Tennis Assn., this is much more than just a business sale.
SPORTS
August 2, 1998 | DAVID WHARTON
One thing Bob Kramer has learned over the years--it doesn't pay to be too big a tennis fan. That might sound odd coming from the tournament director of the Mercedes-Benz Cup, which concludes today at the Los Angeles Tennis Center at UCLA. But after months of coaxing and cajoling, scrambling to attract big-name players who will attract big crowds, Kramer must distance himself from the proceedings once the draw is set.
SPORTS
June 17, 2006 | BILL DWYRE
Jack Kramer's shot at a gold medal in the Olympic 100 meters is gone. So is a top-10 finish in the Boston Marathon. Right now, the priority is simpler: walking. Right now, the person arguably most important in the development and evolution of tennis for more than half a century is flat on his back at home in Brentwood.
SPORTS
August 1, 2001 | DIANE PUCIN
Jack Kramer was the first man to win Wimbledon while wearing shorts, even though his tennis hero, Ellsworth Vines, reminded Kramer of Fred Astaire because of the graceful flow of Vines' white flannel long pants.
SPORTS
October 31, 1995 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Old friends recalled fond memories of Bobby Riggs at a memorial service for the late tennis champion Monday at Encinitas. Pancho Segura remembered learning poker and gin rummy from Riggs, then losing all his money to his mentor. Jack Kramer remembered pitching pennies with Riggs to see who would buy lunch on a Sunday afternoon in Christchurch, New Zealand, "and we almost get put in jail for gambling." To Ted Schroeder, one word summed up Riggs' life--action.
SPORTS
July 6, 1997 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Jack Kramer had more hindsight and less foresight, and if the officials at the All England Club were more forward thinking and less mired in the past, everyone might be getting along much better now. As it is, on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of his landmark Wimbledon title, Kramer is comfortable enough to return to the scene of both his greatest victory and his most public humiliation.
SPORTS
June 17, 2006 | BILL DWYRE
Jack Kramer's shot at a gold medal in the Olympic 100 meters is gone. So is a top-10 finish in the Boston Marathon. Right now, the priority is simpler: walking. Right now, the person arguably most important in the development and evolution of tennis for more than half a century is flat on his back at home in Brentwood.
SPORTS
August 1, 2001 | DIANE PUCIN
Jack Kramer was the first man to win Wimbledon while wearing shorts, even though his tennis hero, Ellsworth Vines, reminded Kramer of Fred Astaire because of the graceful flow of Vines' white flannel long pants.
SPORTS
August 2, 1998 | DAVID WHARTON
One thing Bob Kramer has learned over the years--it doesn't pay to be too big a tennis fan. That might sound odd coming from the tournament director of the Mercedes-Benz Cup, which concludes today at the Los Angeles Tennis Center at UCLA. But after months of coaxing and cajoling, scrambling to attract big-name players who will attract big crowds, Kramer must distance himself from the proceedings once the draw is set.
SPORTS
July 6, 1997 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Jack Kramer had more hindsight and less foresight, and if the officials at the All England Club were more forward thinking and less mired in the past, everyone might be getting along much better now. As it is, on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of his landmark Wimbledon title, Kramer is comfortable enough to return to the scene of both his greatest victory and his most public humiliation.
SPORTS
October 31, 1995 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Old friends recalled fond memories of Bobby Riggs at a memorial service for the late tennis champion Monday at Encinitas. Pancho Segura remembered learning poker and gin rummy from Riggs, then losing all his money to his mentor. Jack Kramer remembered pitching pennies with Riggs to see who would buy lunch on a Sunday afternoon in Christchurch, New Zealand, "and we almost get put in jail for gambling." To Ted Schroeder, one word summed up Riggs' life--action.
SPORTS
December 31, 1994
I was incensed at Thomas Bonk's write-up of Ivan Lendl's career. Here we have the retirement of one of the 10 greats of the game and all he can do is knock the man. A failure to win Wimbledon hardly makes Lendl's a flawed career, or tragic, as Jack Kramer would have it. Lendl won eight Grand Slam events in seven years: Can (Jimmy) Connors, (John) McEnroe or Kramer make that claim? Bonk describes Lendl as a dour man with a "grating personality that drew few fans his way." I disagree.
SPORTS
April 27, 1986 | BILL DWYRE, Times Sports Editor
When sophomore Brad Pearce, UCLA's No. 1 tennis player, announced a month ago that he would turn professional after this season, he certainly was thinking about days like the one he had Saturday. Here he was, playing on center court in the semifinals of a traditional and prestigious tournament, being cheered on by a couple of thousand fans and winning his match over an opponent named McEnroe. Instant stardom, Boris Becker style? Well, not quite.
SPORTS
May 17, 1987 | United Press International
If the United States is to end its tennis slump, junior players must change their style. So says Jack Kramer, the former Wimbledon and U.S. champion, who points to Sweden and West Germany, which are are producing the new generation of champions thanks to programs for top young players. Kramer fears Jimmy Arias and Aaron Krickstein are the first of many American players who will be best remembered as teen-age wonders.
SPORTS
June 15, 1990
Jack Kramer, winner of the U.S. tennis championships in 1946 and '47 and Wimbledon in 1947, will be honored during the Volvo Tennis/Los Angeles tournament July 28-Aug. 5.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|