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Jack Lalanne

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NEWS
January 24, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Jack LaLanne was a junk-food junkie when he was a teenager -- hardly an auspicious beginning for the man who would be father of the fitness movement in America. But it was meeting another early healthy believer that turned him around. LaLanne, who died Sunday at 96, credits nutritionist Paul Bragg with helping him see the light. His mother took him to a lecture when he was 15. A Los Angeles Times obituary explains what happened next: "At some point, Bragg asked the young LaLanne what he had eaten for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and LaLanne told him: 'Cakes, pies, ice cream!
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HEALTH
May 26, 2012 | By James Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Full disclosure alert! I practically worshiped Jack LaLanne, who invented the modern fitness industry. He died last year at the age of 96. So, imagine how excited I was to get to speak with the woman who helped make Jack even more Jack. His widow, Elaine LaLanne, played a big role in Jack's fitness empire, and it was truly a delight to speak with this vibrant and entertaining woman. How did you and Jack start off together? He was a junk food junkie as a kid, and when we met so was I. We formed a relationship because of his show.
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HEALTH
January 31, 2011 | By James Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jack LaLanne was an incredible showoff, and with good reason. If you can do 1,033 push-ups in 23 minutes at the "over-the-hill" age of 42, then by all means show yourself off. If you can swim more than a mile through the strong currents of Long Beach Harbor while towing 70 people in 70 rowboats on your 70th birthday, then you've earned the right to show off ? especially if you do this while handcuffed and shackled. Jack lived his life completing implausible feats of strength and endurance, seemingly as a challenge to a world that said, "Let's see you do that!"
HEALTH
September 19, 2011 | Roy Wallack, Gear
Things look a little rough for Arnold Schwarzenegger right now. But as tarnished politicians (think Eliot Spitzer), businessmen (Michael Milken) and Hollywood stars (Robert Downey Jr.) have proved, it is possible to resuscitate one's image with purposeful hard work. And there might be no better avenue for Schwarzenegger than to go back to his roots and invest his celebrity, powers of persuasion and vast array of connections in a grand public project that would educate, entertain, boost the economy and properly enshrine Los Angeles' rightful place in the development of a world-renowned industry: the International Fitness Museum.
MAGAZINE
November 14, 2004
Ninety-year-old Jack LaLanne, you've obviously been drinking from Ponce de Leon's fountain ("Ninety Years of Muscle," by Mark Edward Harris, Metropolis, Oct. 24). Yours is the greatest quote of the year: "Sex and exercise, you can't overdo them. Try it." Steve Freeman Riverside
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | Associated Press
Fitness guru Jack LaLanne was arrested for investigation of drunk driving, a California Highway Patrol spokeswoman said Thursday. LaLanne, 76, helped create the fitness movement with his namesake health clubs and exercise techniques. He was stopped by CHP officers Sunday night and a report was filed in Municipal Court on Wednesday. According to the report, LaLanne crossed the center divider and failed a field sobriety test. The report said LaLanne's blood-alcohol level was 0.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2011 | By Claudia Luther, Special to The Times
Jack LaLanne, the seemingly eternal master of health and fitness who first popularized the idea that Americans should work out and eat right to retain youthfulness and vigor, died Sunday. He was 96. LaLanne died of respiratory failure due to pneumonia at his home in Morro Bay, Calif., his agent Rick Hersh said. He had undergone heart valve surgery in December 2009. FOR THE RECORD: Jack LaLanne: The obituary of fitness pioneer Jack LaLanne in the Jan. 24 LATExtra section, and a headline accompanying the article online, reported that LaLanne opened what is commonly believed to be the nation's first health club, in Oakland in 1936.
MAGAZINE
October 24, 2004 | MARK EDWARD HARRIS
If California is world headquarters for juicing, weightlifting, supplement-happy fitness lovers, thank Jack LaLanne. Oh, and wish him happy birthday: LaLanne, who turned 90 in September, had an epiphany after attending a health lecture as a sickly, underweight 15-year-old in Berkeley, and he's been breaking records ever since.
NEWS
May 24, 1988 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
It's 5 a.m. and not a creature is stirring when Jack LaLanne drags his physically fit body out of bed and into his home gym to pump iron for two hours. Little has changed in this daily ritual over the last 50 years, not the lat pulls, not the bench presses, not the stomach crunches, not the dread of the workout itself. Not even the blue jumpsuit. At 73, LaLanne is still as fervent about exercise as a fundamentalist minister.
HEALTH
May 26, 2012 | By James Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Full disclosure alert! I practically worshiped Jack LaLanne, who invented the modern fitness industry. He died last year at the age of 96. So, imagine how excited I was to get to speak with the woman who helped make Jack even more Jack. His widow, Elaine LaLanne, played a big role in Jack's fitness empire, and it was truly a delight to speak with this vibrant and entertaining woman. How did you and Jack start off together? He was a junk food junkie as a kid, and when we met so was I. We formed a relationship because of his show.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2011
The Pasadena Playhouse will take over the programming of its 75-seat second stage, the Carrie Hamilton Theatre, after parting ways with the Furious Theatre Company, which had been the upstairs theater's resident company since 2004. Stephen Eich, the playhouse's executive director, and Furious managing director Nick Cernoch said Tuesday that the split was amicable. Eich said that he and artistic director Sheldon Epps will make the programming decisions. "We can expect classes, music, comedy, maybe a longer-running show," he said.
HEALTH
January 31, 2011 | By James Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jack LaLanne was an incredible showoff, and with good reason. If you can do 1,033 push-ups in 23 minutes at the "over-the-hill" age of 42, then by all means show yourself off. If you can swim more than a mile through the strong currents of Long Beach Harbor while towing 70 people in 70 rowboats on your 70th birthday, then you've earned the right to show off ? especially if you do this while handcuffed and shackled. Jack lived his life completing implausible feats of strength and endurance, seemingly as a challenge to a world that said, "Let's see you do that!"
NEWS
January 24, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Jack LaLanne was a junk-food junkie when he was a teenager -- hardly an auspicious beginning for the man who would be father of the fitness movement in America. But it was meeting another early healthy believer that turned him around. LaLanne, who died Sunday at 96, credits nutritionist Paul Bragg with helping him see the light. His mother took him to a lecture when he was 15. A Los Angeles Times obituary explains what happened next: "At some point, Bragg asked the young LaLanne what he had eaten for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and LaLanne told him: 'Cakes, pies, ice cream!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2011 | By Claudia Luther, Special to The Times
Jack LaLanne, the seemingly eternal master of health and fitness who first popularized the idea that Americans should work out and eat right to retain youthfulness and vigor, died Sunday. He was 96. LaLanne died of respiratory failure due to pneumonia at his home in Morro Bay, Calif., his agent Rick Hersh said. He had undergone heart valve surgery in December 2009. FOR THE RECORD: Jack LaLanne: The obituary of fitness pioneer Jack LaLanne in the Jan. 24 LATExtra section, and a headline accompanying the article online, reported that LaLanne opened what is commonly believed to be the nation's first health club, in Oakland in 1936.
HEALTH
May 10, 2010 | By Rodney Kemerer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"I haven't done this since the eighth grade, so be gentle with me." Those were my first words to William, a personal trainer, at our first session. And I wasn't kidding. I had avoided sports and sport-like activity all my life, including televised sports. In college, where Phys. Ed. was a requirement, I chose my classes based on whether or not you had to change your clothes. The result: I took bowling, archery, shuffleboard and bait casting (I'm not kidding). Thank you, Penn State.
MAGAZINE
November 14, 2004
Ninety-year-old Jack LaLanne, you've obviously been drinking from Ponce de Leon's fountain ("Ninety Years of Muscle," by Mark Edward Harris, Metropolis, Oct. 24). Yours is the greatest quote of the year: "Sex and exercise, you can't overdo them. Try it." Steve Freeman Riverside
NEWS
June 15, 1991 | Associated Press
Fitness guru Jack LaLanne denied Friday that he was under the influence of alcohol when he was arrested by the California Highway Patrol last weekend and booked for investigation of drunk driving. "I wasn't drunk one bit, nothing, there's nothing to this," LaLanne, said. The CHP said the 76-year-old LaLanne was stopped Sunday night after crossing a center divider in his car and then failing a sobriety test that indicated his blood alcohol level was 0.08%.
NEWS
August 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fitness guru Jack LaLanne has pleaded no contest to a charge of alcohol-related reckless driving. An attorney entered the plea for the 76-year-old LaLanne after prosecutors agreed to drop a more serious misdemeanor charge of drunk driving. Under the agreement, LaLanne will be placed on probation for one year, pay a $525 fine and attend eight hours of alcohol education classes, said Deputy Dist. Atty. Karen Medeiros.
MAGAZINE
October 24, 2004 | MARK EDWARD HARRIS
If California is world headquarters for juicing, weightlifting, supplement-happy fitness lovers, thank Jack LaLanne. Oh, and wish him happy birthday: LaLanne, who turned 90 in September, had an epiphany after attending a health lecture as a sickly, underweight 15-year-old in Berkeley, and he's been breaking records ever since.
HEALTH
March 22, 1999 | KATHY SMITH
Joe DiMaggio transcended the sport of baseball. More than an American icon, he achieved nearly mythic status while he was alive. No wonder the media couldn't stop talking and writing about him after he died two weeks ago. As always happens when someone of greatness passes on, I felt sad that the great man himself didn't get to hear all the lovely eulogizing.
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