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June 5, 1987 | JOHN WEYLER, Times Staff Writer
The Angels were leading by a run in the ninth inning Thursday night, but there wasn't anybody in Anaheim Stadium ready to bet the house on an Angel victory. For the Angels and their fans, optimism is a rare commodity these days. Almost as rare as victories. Jack Lazorko was on the mound. He was leading, 3-2. But he had made it into the ninth inning on three occasions this season and had yet to come away with a win.
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SPORTS
July 5, 1988 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Jack Lazorko is the Angels' real-life answer to Crash Davis, although Kevin Costner could never play the role. Bob Hoskins is a closer match, as any recent visit to an Angel game will attest. The Jack Lazorko story is 11 years of minor league bus rides from Sarasota to Daytona to Asheville to Tulsa to Edmonton, 11 years of pining and plugging and pushing . . . often, disappointment.
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SPORTS
June 29, 1988 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Jack Lazorko was in Las Vegas when he got the word Monday night: Anaheim calling again. "They had to pull me off the craps tables," said Lazorko, the Angels' latest recall from Edmonton. And he wasn't kidding. "I was doing well there, too." he said. "I always do well in Vegas." Yeah, sure, Jack. That's what everybody says. "Hey," Lazorko told a group of disbelievers. "You should see my kids' bedroom. They've got a bunk bed and new furniture because of what I've won at Vegas."
SPORTS
June 29, 1988 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Jack Lazorko was in Las Vegas when he got the word Monday night: Anaheim calling again. "They had to pull me off the craps tables," said Lazorko, the Angels' latest recall from Edmonton. And he wasn't kidding. "I was doing well there, too." he said. "I always do well in Vegas." Yeah, sure, Jack. That's what everybody says. "Hey," Lazorko told a group of disbelievers. "You should see my kids' bedroom. They've got a bunk bed and new furniture because of what I've won at Vegas."
SPORTS
July 5, 1988 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Jack Lazorko is the Angels' real-life answer to Crash Davis, although Kevin Costner could never play the role. Bob Hoskins is a closer match, as any recent visit to an Angel game will attest. The Jack Lazorko story is 11 years of minor league bus rides from Sarasota to Daytona to Asheville to Tulsa to Edmonton, 11 years of pining and plugging and pushing . . . often, disappointment.
SPORTS
July 11, 1987 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
The Angels adored Jack Lazorko when he pitched his way to a 7-0 minor league record earlier this season. They loved him when he later helped rescue a depleted starting staff, often lasting until the seventh, eighth, ninth innings. And they marveled at his tenacity, his nimble fielding. Good ol' Lazorko, 31, and still doing what he could. Of course, that was before Friday night's 9-4 loss to the Detroit Tigers, the same team that released him after three appearances last season.
SPORTS
March 22, 1988 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Give the Angels some credit. Through the years, whenever a rule change or new baseball trend has been thrown their way, they've usually reacted by quickly digging in and taking their best hacks at it: --Free agency. The Angels welcomed the concept with open arms, and open palms, picking up Bobby Grich, Don Baylor and Joe Rudi during one wild eight-day shopping spree in late 1976. --The designated hitter.
SPORTS
July 16, 1988
Jack Lazorko spends 11 years in the minor leagues, always hoping for a shot at the majors. He pitched pretty well for the Angels last year and was rewarded with a ticket back to Edmonton. This year he was brought up for two starts, came within two outs of earning a win over Toronto and he wound up back on the one-way to Edmonton. When all those other general managers were in collusion, who was Mike Port talking to--General Noriega? PHIL BARTOLI Manhattan Beach
SPORTS
July 11, 1987 | JIM McCURDIE, Times Staff Writer
The paths of Dan Petry, Jack Lazorko and Eric King crossed again Friday night in Anaheim Stadium. Strange how the often winding and bumpy roads of professional baseball careers can lead three men to one busy intersection, where each has a hand--if not an arm--in the outcome of a game. Example: the pitchers of influence in Friday night's game between the Angels and Detroit Tigers. Jack Lazorko started for the Angels, Dan Petry for the Tigers. Last Aug.
SPORTS
July 22, 1987 | Associated Press
Roger Clemens scattered five hits for his major league-leading fourth shutout this season Tuesday night as the Boston Red Sox downed the Angels, 3-0, on Jim Rice's two-run homer. Clemens, who set a major-league record last season by striking out 20 in one game, failed to strike out a batter and didn't issue a walk as he improved his record to 9-7 with his 10th complete game of the season.
SPORTS
March 22, 1988 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Give the Angels some credit. Through the years, whenever a rule change or new baseball trend has been thrown their way, they've usually reacted by quickly digging in and taking their best hacks at it: --Free agency. The Angels welcomed the concept with open arms, and open palms, picking up Bobby Grich, Don Baylor and Joe Rudi during one wild eight-day shopping spree in late 1976. --The designated hitter.
SPORTS
July 11, 1987 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
The Angels adored Jack Lazorko when he pitched his way to a 7-0 minor league record earlier this season. They loved him when he later helped rescue a depleted starting staff, often lasting until the seventh, eighth, ninth innings. And they marveled at his tenacity, his nimble fielding. Good ol' Lazorko, 31, and still doing what he could. Of course, that was before Friday night's 9-4 loss to the Detroit Tigers, the same team that released him after three appearances last season.
SPORTS
June 5, 1987 | JOHN WEYLER, Times Staff Writer
The Angels were leading by a run in the ninth inning Thursday night, but there wasn't anybody in Anaheim Stadium ready to bet the house on an Angel victory. For the Angels and their fans, optimism is a rare commodity these days. Almost as rare as victories. Jack Lazorko was on the mound. He was leading, 3-2. But he had made it into the ninth inning on three occasions this season and had yet to come away with a win.
SPORTS
April 1, 1988 | MIKE PENNER
Chili and Cookie and Peaches and Griffin, Alfredo are on the Dodger Stadium menu tonight when the Angels and the Dodgers open the 18th Freeway Series at 7:05 p.m. The Angels, with a new manager, Cookie Rojas, and a new right fielder, Chili Davis, will also have a new pitcher on the mound--Dan Petry. Peaches, as he was known in Detroit, is bidding to become the club's No. 3 starter, but a back injury and three straight exhibition shellings have left him with spring numbers of 0-3 and an 11.
SPORTS
March 3, 1989 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
This time last year, Dan Petry was flat on his back, resting a herniated disk that wiped out half of his first training camp with the Angels and set the tone for the summer ahead. Petry wound up spending much of the 1988 baseball season off his feet--two months, in fact, after suffering an ankle sprain of near-world record proportion. Petry sprained the ankle on June 20 while fielding Kirby Puckett's grounder--and didn't pitch again for the Angels until Aug. 30.
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