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Jack Lohrke

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SPORTS
June 27, 1990 | BOB WOLF
They call him Lucky, and never in the history of baseball has a nickname been more appropriate. Jack Lohrke, who played for the minor league Padres and then spent seven seasons in the majors, insists today that the series of near misses he went through was no big deal. But the facts say otherwise. Consider this log of Lohrke's good fortune: In 1944, as a member of the 35th Infantry Division during World War II, Lohrke participated in the Normandy invasion and the Battle of the Bulge.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Jack Lohrke, a major league infielder in the 1940s and '50s whose seeming ability to cheat death away from the baseball diamond earned him the nickname "Lucky," has died. He was 85. Lohrke died Wednesday at a San Jose hospital two days after having a stroke at his home, said his son John. Discovered as a teenager in the early 1940s on the semipro fields of Los Angeles, Lohrke spent seven seasons with the New York Giants and the Philadelphia Phillies after serving in World War II.
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SPORTS
July 9, 1990 | BOB WOLF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They call him Lucky, and never in the history of baseball has a nickname been more appropriate. Jack Lohrke, a former major leaguer and Hollywood Star, says today that the series of near misses he went through was no big deal. But the facts say otherwise. Consider Lohrke's good fortune: --In 1944, as a member of the 35th Infantry Division during World War II, Lohrke participated in the Normandy invasion and the Battle of the Bulge.
SPORTS
July 9, 1990 | BOB WOLF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They call him Lucky, and never in the history of baseball has a nickname been more appropriate. Jack Lohrke, a former major leaguer and Hollywood Star, says today that the series of near misses he went through was no big deal. But the facts say otherwise. Consider Lohrke's good fortune: --In 1944, as a member of the 35th Infantry Division during World War II, Lohrke participated in the Normandy invasion and the Battle of the Bulge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Jack Lohrke, a major league infielder in the 1940s and '50s whose seeming ability to cheat death away from the baseball diamond earned him the nickname "Lucky," has died. He was 85. Lohrke died Wednesday at a San Jose hospital two days after having a stroke at his home, said his son John. Discovered as a teenager in the early 1940s on the semipro fields of Los Angeles, Lohrke spent seven seasons with the New York Giants and the Philadelphia Phillies after serving in World War II.
NEWS
May 7, 2009
Lohrke obituary: The obituary of major league baseball infielder Jack "Lucky" Lohrke in Friday's Section A said he fought in the D-day invasion of Normandy as a member of the 35th Infantry Division. That division joined the Normandy campaign after D-day.
SPORTS
July 4, 1993 | FRANK LYNCH, BALTIMORE SUN
Whatever happened to nicknames in baseball? They used to be as much a part of the game as home runs, strikeouts and stolen bases. That charming part of the game seems to have been lost on the current generation. Everyone has a theory as to why attendance has dropped and only a handful of major league teams are showing a profit. I'd like to add mine. It's the missing nicknames.
SPORTS
June 15, 2003 | From Associated Press
The Spokane Indians have known tragedy and greatness, scoundrels and Hall of Famers. They've finished first and last, and even left town. Now, as they celebrate a century of baseball, the Indians are owned by George Brett and three of his brothers, and are perhaps the premier franchise in the Northwest League. "I enjoy going to a minor league park more than I do going to a major league stadium," Brett says in a new video "Spokane Indians, a Century of Baseball," produced for the centennial.
SPORTS
May 25, 1992 | ALLAN MALAMUD
Only the Indy 500 has a more imposing disabled list than the National or American League. . . . What eventually saved the day was that the demolition derby turned into a drag race. . . . If some of the veterans who dropped out had driven with as much intelligence as rookie Lyn St. James, they also would have finished the race. . . . New description of the Dodgers--scrappy. . . .
SPORTS
June 27, 1990 | BOB WOLF
They call him Lucky, and never in the history of baseball has a nickname been more appropriate. Jack Lohrke, who played for the minor league Padres and then spent seven seasons in the majors, insists today that the series of near misses he went through was no big deal. But the facts say otherwise. Consider this log of Lohrke's good fortune: In 1944, as a member of the 35th Infantry Division during World War II, Lohrke participated in the Normandy invasion and the Battle of the Bulge.
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