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Jack London

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January 5, 2009 | Thomas Meaney, Meaney is a New York-based critic and reviewer.
Since Jack London's mysterious death in 1916, he has been, like one of the frozen men in his Klondike tales, a writer encased in his own reputation: We know him as the dog writer. Whether it was Buck in "The Call of the Wild," coming to terms with his inner-wolf, or the husky in "To Build a Fire," edging out his master in a Darwinian struggle against the cold, London could lock our emotions onto canines without making it feel like a sentimental exercise. London was a man of contradictions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Hector Becerra,
Los Angeles firefighters and paramedics responded to an intersection in Woodland Hills on Thursday night after a three-car crash left five people injured, three of them critically. Katherine Main of the Los Angeles City Fire Department said the crash was reported about 9:45 p.m. near the intersection of Oakdale Avenue and Ventura Boulevard. She said two of the patients were in fair condition. One of the three critically injured patients had to be extricated from a car using the “jaws of life,” Main said.
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NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
After Jack London penned "The Call of the Wild," he went traveling again. The American novelist who wrote so brilliantly about the brutal Klondike later turned a photographer's eye on the world aboard ships headed to exotic places like the South Pacific and the tip of South America. London chronicled those early 20th century voyages with a camera, and now 50 of his photographs are on display through Dec. 3 at the Maritime Museum of San Diego. London shot images of seaworthy scenes while traveling on a 42-foot "ketch-rigged sailboat" called the Snark bound for the South Pacific in 1907-08 and on the Dirigo en route to Cape Horn four years later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Jack's Oak is a towering tree more than 300 years old that stands outside Jack London's cottage in Sonoma County's Glen Ellen. London would see the oak when he looked out his office window, and he wrote in the shade of its outstretched branches.  Officials had planned to cut down the tree in November because arborists had determined that it was dying and was infected with pathogenic fungi. But the Press Democrat reported this week that although another test confirmed there was significant decay, officials with Jack London State Historic Park think it can stay up a bit longer.
NEWS
April 5, 1992
Becky London, 89, author Jack London's last surviving child. Before moving to a Sacramento convalescent hospital in November, she had lived in Glen Ellen, next to the Jack London Bookstore. Becky London was the spitting image of her famous father, said Russ Kingman, owner of the bookstore. She was born in Oakland and lived there until moving to Glen Ellen about eight years ago. Her father owned a ranch in Glen Ellen from 1905 to 1916.
NEWS
January 12, 1986 | Associated Press
Jack London fans, history buffs and stamp collectors turned out Saturday for ceremonies dedicating a postage stamp to the prolific writer. "It was really quite an event for a town like this," said Kip Fogarty of the North Bay Postal Service. London, who wrote such novels as "The Call of the Wild" and "The Sea-Wolf," did much of his work at a small ranch not far from the Dunbar Elementary School in Glen Ellen, where the ceremonies were held.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1988 | Associated Press
Letters from author Jack London's widow have been delivered to a federal courtroom more than half a century after they were written to a judge and his brother. Three typewritten letters signed by Charmian Kittredge London arrived at the 3rd District Court of Appeal Thursday in a plastic bag stamped "U.S. Mail," the type used for returning mail damaged in handling or found loose in the mails.
NEWS
November 17, 1985 | JOHN M. LEIGHTY, United Press International
Historians and fans of adventure writer Jack London have kicked off a $1.5-million fund-raiser to restore the author's crumbling "Beauty Ranch" in California's Valley of the Moon. "A good earthquake could knock many of the buildings to the ground," said Dave Turner of Santa Rosa, head of the newly formed Jack London Restoration Committee. "We've decided to do something to restore Jack's area before it goes to rack and ruin."
NEWS
October 9, 1988 | DAVE CARPENTER, Associated Press
Becky London never answered the call of the wild and rarely got the attention she craved from her famous father. But despite a somewhat sheltered childhood and unremarkable life, she remains a striking link to a man whose tales of struggles for survival made him America's most beloved author a lifetime ago. If Jack London were alive today, he would enjoy spinning yarns with his only surviving child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1988 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
Li Shuyan, scholar from the People's Republic of China, is speaking with sheer delight about her favorite American writer, Jack London. On her lunch break, Li is talking in English. She speaks nearly flawlessly and with great rapidity and complexity about why she has traveled halfway around the world to spend three months ensconced in the muffled quiet of a windowless room filled with rare books at the Huntington Library in San Marino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Hector Becerra
A single-engine Cessna airplane crashed Thursday evening in the frontyard of a Fresno home, killing two people on board including a young boy, authorities said. Fresno Fire Department spokesman Koby Johns told the Associated Press that the plane hit a tree before crashing, then caught fire. He said the adult male pilot and a boy who was about 9 died in the accident. No one on the ground was injured. The names of the victims have not been released. The Fresno Bee reported that the boy was the pilot's nephew.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
Unmistakable topicality and human interest infuses “From Wharf Rats to Lord of the Docks” and “To Begin the World Over Again,” now playing in rep at the Lillian Theatre in Hollywood. Writer-performer Ian Ruskin's solo shows about, respectively, labor-union pioneer Harry Bridges and American Revolution visionary Thomas Paine have their academic aspects, but both are undeniably apropos for the corporatist-beleaguered present. “Wharf Rats,” the older of the pieces, has been performed countless times, filmed by Haskell Wexler and broadcast by PBS repeatedly since 2009.
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
After Jack London penned "The Call of the Wild," he went traveling again. The American novelist who wrote so brilliantly about the brutal Klondike later turned a photographer's eye on the world aboard ships headed to exotic places like the South Pacific and the tip of South America. London chronicled those early 20th century voyages with a camera, and now 50 of his photographs are on display through Dec. 3 at the Maritime Museum of San Diego. London shot images of seaworthy scenes while traveling on a 42-foot "ketch-rigged sailboat" called the Snark bound for the South Pacific in 1907-08 and on the Dirigo en route to Cape Horn four years later.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | Karen Wada
Jack London is best known as a writer of red-blooded adventure tales. But he was also a journalist, traveler, social activist -- and prolific photographer. "People might hear this and think we're talking tourist snapshots," says Sara S. Hodson, one of three co-authors of "Jack London: Photographer" (University of Georgia Press, $49.95). "However this wasn't an idle hobby. He took thousands of pictures and created a serious body of work. " Hodson is curator of literary manuscripts at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, where she administers its extensive London archive.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2009 | Thomas Meaney, Meaney is a New York-based critic and reviewer.
Since Jack London's mysterious death in 1916, he has been, like one of the frozen men in his Klondike tales, a writer encased in his own reputation: We know him as the dog writer. Whether it was Buck in "The Call of the Wild," coming to terms with his inner-wolf, or the husky in "To Build a Fire," edging out his master in a Darwinian struggle against the cold, London could lock our emotions onto canines without making it feel like a sentimental exercise. London was a man of contradictions.
NEWS
July 2, 2006 | Michelle Locke, Associated Press Writer
You've heard of Jack London, celebrated author of "The Call of the Wild," and "White Fang." You also may know him as an intrepid world traveler and socialist crusader. But chances are you don't know Jack London the sustainable farmer who pioneered environmentally friendly practices on his sprawling ranch in Northern California's wine country. London, it turns out, thought about more than dogs, danger and derring-do.
TRAVEL
April 7, 1991 | GRAHAME L. JONES, Jones is a former Times staff writer and editor
No matter where in the world he roamed--from the frozen vastness of the Klondike to balmy tropical islands in the South Seas--this was the spot that Jack London loved best, the place to which his thoughts most frequently turned, the place he felt at peace. It was here, in 1903, that he began a love affair with the land that was to last until his death 13 years later. It was here that he built his farm, the aptly named Beauty Ranch.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1998 | DEANNE STILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of my favorite places in Los Angeles is the desert garden at the Huntington Library. When unable to get to the desert itself, I visit this magic cactus enclave. Here, I walk the paths of a silent freak show, marvel at the tortured beauties frozen in time, the miraculous poofs of color amid this scape of thirst. I'm in another world, transported back to the wide-open spaces where never is heard a discouraging word and the skies are not cloudy or gray.
NEWS
May 24, 2005 | Susan Dworski
Jack London is the granddaddy of American adventure writing, the sine qua non against which subsequent macho fictioneers such as Kerouac, Steinbeck and the mighty Hemingway must be judged. Written 100 years ago, this brawny collection of virile adventures in gold-rush Alaska and on the foaming seas of the South Pacific seethe with testosterone-laced immediacy and rollicking, wild energy as men pit themselves against the implacable, pitiless forces of brute nature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2005 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
They say one was non-American. And the other was un-American. So a plan to name new reading rooms at El Segundo's public library in honor of authors Agatha Christie and Jack London has been ordered shelved by the City Council. "I'm a great fan of Agatha Christie. Murder mystery novels is what I read. But she's a British citizen," said Councilman John Gaines. "And I'm also a great fan of Jack London. I read all his books as a kid. But quite frankly, he was a world-renowned communist."
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