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Jack Lowe

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MAGAZINE
January 28, 2001 | RICHARD CHEVERTON, Richard Cheverton last wrote for the magazine about modern architecture in the San Fernando Valley. He is the author of "The Maverick Way" (Maverick Way Publishing)
Time has claimed the greats of Bay Area abstract art who came of age in the years after World War II. Richard Diebenkorn, David Park, Elmer Bischoff, Joan Brown, Jon Schueler--all gone, save one: Jack Lowe. At 78, he's struggling with bone cancer, his body weakening even as his mind remains lucid. But that's not what preoccupies him as the shadows lengthen. It's the artist's lonely challenge of "finding my identity" and leaving behind a legacy of paintings that will do just that.
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MAGAZINE
January 28, 2001 | RICHARD CHEVERTON, Richard Cheverton last wrote for the magazine about modern architecture in the San Fernando Valley. He is the author of "The Maverick Way" (Maverick Way Publishing)
Time has claimed the greats of Bay Area abstract art who came of age in the years after World War II. Richard Diebenkorn, David Park, Elmer Bischoff, Joan Brown, Jon Schueler--all gone, save one: Jack Lowe. At 78, he's struggling with bone cancer, his body weakening even as his mind remains lucid. But that's not what preoccupies him as the shadows lengthen. It's the artist's lonely challenge of "finding my identity" and leaving behind a legacy of paintings that will do just that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND
For a man responsible for cheerleading a human rights organization in the United States, Jack Healey--the guiding force behind the "Human Rights Now!" tour--sounded surprisingly downbeat backstage Wednesday night at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Though he cited the successes of the tour in promoting human rights causes, Healey was plainly concerned about the toll that the global rock tour--now at the halfway point in its six-week schedule--was taking on the staff and crew.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND
For a man responsible for cheerleading a human rights organization in the United States, Jack Healey--the guiding force behind the "Human Rights Now!" tour--sounded surprisingly downbeat backstage Wednesday night at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Though he cited the successes of the tour in promoting human rights causes, Healey was plainly concerned about the toll that the global rock tour--now at the halfway point in its six-week schedule--was taking on the staff and crew.
OPINION
March 24, 2002
Re "Saudi Editor Retracts Article That Defamed Jews," March 20: The Times is to be complimented for the coverage of the recent revival of the old, anti-Semitic blood libel issue. That such a report could still appear in Al Riyadh, a newspaper controlled by the Saudi government, in 2002 shows how deep is the hatred of non-Muslims (specifically Jews and Christians). Egyptian editor Adel Hammouda's remark that there is nothing governments can do to stop the spread and expression of anti-Semitic feelings is ridiculous.
NEWS
September 28, 1997 | J.L. SCHMIDT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Between the bird-feed plant and the railroad viaduct, a weathered sign proclaims just about everything this town of 6,000 has to offer: 25 churches, 10 motels, 14 restaurants and 29 service clubs. Add three newspapers, with this month's debut of the Sidney Daily Sun. "I would guess this is the only town with 6,000 people and three newspapers," said Jack Lowe, editor emeritus of the 126-year-old Sidney Telegraph.
NEWS
March 24, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George Charles Sumner Benson, author, expert on government administration and founding president of Claremont Men's College, now known as Claremont McKenna College, has died at the age of 91. Benson, who was also a high-ranking Pentagon official during the Vietnam War, died Monday at the Pilgrim Place retirement home in Claremont, college officials said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Andrew J. Lowe's single engine Piper Malibu crashed into a strip mall on May 28 just moments after takeoff from Hawthorne Airport, it sent airplane owners from Van Nuys to Compton reeling. And not just because every pilot could imagine himself in Lowe's place. Lowe was a member of the California Black Aviation Assn., a tight-knit group of pilots who fly together from airports in Hawthorne, Compton and Van Nuys to places like Cabo San Lucas and Las Vegas.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | HOWARD BLUME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Sullens didn't rate a call from the mayor of Whittier in 1987 when city leaders frowned on his plans to demonstrate against the demolition of local historic buildings. The carpet store owner got a call, instead, from the sister-in-law of an ex-City Council member, who told him that protests were unacceptable because they made the city look bad.
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