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Jack M Guralnik

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NEWS
May 2, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The aging of America will escalate health-care costs in a way that no "cost containment" will be able to control, according to a new federal study that the researchers say supports the growing demand for more public funding for research into diseases of the elderly. The study's authors, from USC and the National Institute on Aging, predict a threefold increase in Medicare costs by the year 2040.
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NEWS
May 2, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The aging of America will escalate health-care costs in a way that no "cost containment" will be able to control, according to a new federal study that the researchers say supports the growing demand for more public funding for research into diseases of the elderly. The study's authors, from USC and the National Institute on Aging, predict a threefold increase in Medicare costs by the year 2040.
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NEWS
August 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Regular exercise has been found to protect older people from a dangerous type of internal bleeding that kills thousands of elderly Americans every year, according to a study. "People who are physically active are at lower risk of having a severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage," said Dr. Jack M. Guralnik, an epidemiologist at the National Institute on Aging in Chicago and a co-author of the study.
NEWS
February 13, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Contrary to the conclusion of a highly publicized report two years ago, left-handers do not die at an earlier age than right-handed people, researchers at Harvard and the National Institute of Aging said Friday. The researchers studied 3,800 people in East Boston over age 65 for six years and found that the two groups, righties and lefties, died at exactly the same rate. "There was no difference, period," said Dr. Jack M.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A UCLA study due out next month is likely to help answer the question of whether left-handed people die earlier than their right-handed counterparts. Contrary to the highly publicized claims that a statistical shortage of elderly left-handers in the population means that left-handers die earlier, the UCLA study suggests that there is no significant difference in the death rates of the two groups.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Staff Writer
Over the next half-century, the number of Americans over the age of 85 may grow to nearly 24 million--twice as many as the standard U.S. Census Bureau projection and 10 times the current level--according to new study released today by USC and the National Institute of Aging, an arm of the National Institutes of Health.
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