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April 27, 1988 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Contending that too much diversity in belief contributes to the United Methodist Church's 20-year membership decline, Los Angeles Bishop Jack M. Tuell on Tuesday night urged the nation's second-largest Protestant church to bury the idea that Methodists may believe anything they want to. "The time has come to say the last rites over the notion that the defining characteristic of United Methodist theology is pluralism," Tuell said in St.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1989 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
If any church body has needed a rousing, morale-boosting rally, it has been the United Methodist Church. Membership has been steadily declining for more than two decades. Once the largest U.S. Protestant denomination, United Methodists are now a distant second to Southern Baptists. The 9-million-member United Methodists still outnumber Lutherans, Episcopalians and Presbyterians, but many observers say all four established churches are floundering in a "mainline malaise" of uncertain direction.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1989 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
If any church body has needed a rousing, morale-boosting rally, it has been the United Methodist Church. Membership has been steadily declining for more than two decades. Once the largest U.S. Protestant denomination, United Methodists are now a distant second to Southern Baptists. The 9-million-member United Methodists still outnumber Lutherans, Episcopalians and Presbyterians, but many observers say all four established churches are floundering in a "mainline malaise" of uncertain direction.
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Contending that too much diversity in belief contributes to the United Methodist Church's 20-year membership decline, Los Angeles Bishop Jack M. Tuell on Tuesday night urged the nation's second-largest Protestant church to bury the idea that Methodists may believe anything they want to. "The time has come to say the last rites over the notion that the defining characteristic of United Methodist theology is pluralism," Tuell said in St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
Four United Methodist Bishops met recently with President Bush, reviving a custom that began two centuries ago but which has been absent during recent Administrations. Bishop Jack M. Tuell of Los Angeles, president of the denomination's council of bishops, said the audience was sought to commemorate the 1789 visit to George Washington by early Methodist Bishops Francis Asbury and Thomas Coke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1990
Our heartfelt thanks to Jack M. Tuell for his Commentary on values (May 19). We have felt since talk of a state lottery began that it was immoral for the state to be involved in gambling. Of course, the power of the wealthy lottery equipment manufacturers could speak so much louder than those of us who could only vote a resounding "no" at the ballot box. The whole lottery system is a tragic scam and benefits no one except the lottery operators. When will the dreamers realize that for one person to win millions, a lot of dreamers must lose a lot of money?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1989 | JOHN DART
United Methodist Bishop Jack M. Tuell of Los Angeles on Friday will begin a one-year term as president of his denomination's Council of Bishops, the closest post to presiding bishop that United Methodists have. Forty-nine active U.S. bishops and 17 overseas bishops--plus about 50 non-voting, retired bishops--make up the Council of Bishops, which meets twice a year. Tuell will succeed San Antonio, Tex., Bishop Ernest T. Dixon Jr. at the close of the four-day spring meeting of the council next week in Raleigh, N.C. Bishops at the meeting will receive first copies of the United Methodist Hymnal, a revised edition that sparked controversy between 1985 and 1987 over whether some old favorites were sexist, racist or militaristic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1990
Jack M. Tuell's column (commentary, May 19) points out convincingly the damage being perpetrated upon California's citizenry by the state lottery. We need to be reminded again that: - The lottery is a regressive tax on the poor, often robbing families of the necessities of life. - Schools obtain only a minuscule percentage of their budgets from lottery support. - Promotional publicity for the lottery is misleading since it emphasizes the drama of winning, playing down the overwhelming odds against any windfall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bishop Roy I. Sano has been assigned to the United Methodist churches in Southern California, succeeding Jack M. Tuell, who is retiring. Sano, 61, is the first Asian-American bishop for Southern California and will assume his post Sept. 1. Delegates at the church's western regional gathering met on the University of Las Vegas campus last week to select a successor for Tuell, who has served for 12 years. Now assigned to the Denver area, Sano was born in Brawley, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1987 | Danielle A. Fouquette
In July, 1985, Bishop Jack M. Tuell of the United Methodist Church, asked the Rev. W. Terry VanHook to determine whether or not residents of Laguna Niguel would be interested in forming a congregation. Sunday, Tuell will charter Christ United Methodist Church, officially recognizing the congregation as a part of the denomination. He will lead the 9:30 a.m. service at the congregation's worship site, Crown Valley Elementary School, 29292 Crown Valley Parkway, Laguna Niguel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Southland leaders of nine Christian denominations and two branches of Judaism, in a joint statement on events following the March 3 videotaped police beating of Rodney G. King, called for an independent citizens' commission to recommend changes in law enforcement training and structures in light of "far too many instances of racial prejudice, bias and harassment directed against minorities."
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