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Jack Mann

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NEWS
September 21, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I just feel that it's finished," a teary, crestfallen Sunny Mann said Friday in Beirut, underlining the apparent collapse of efforts to free more Western hostages, a tentative deal that broke down in coarse bargaining for lives. Mann's husband Jack, a 77-year-old onetime fighter pilot in the Battle of Britain, had been the name floated for the last 10 days as the next hostage to be released.
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NEWS
September 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jack Mann, looking frail but in good spirits, flew into Britain to a hero's welcome after more than two years in solitary confinement at the hands of Lebanese kidnapers. A British television station quoted Mann, 77, as telling his wife, Sunny, that he had been tortured. He said he was chained to a wall and moved from place to place in the trunk of a car. The Shiite Muslim Revolutionary Justice Organization, which released Mann on Tuesday, kept him in almost total isolation, he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1990
Re Jack Mann's article, "Happily, Today's Youth Have Little to Remember--Yet" (Commentary, May 28): He talked about World War II and Vietnam. What happened to World War I and Korea? All tried to keep our way of life free. R. MARON Newport Beach
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | MARILYN RASCHKA and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Briton Jack Mann, frail and angry at 77, the oldest Western hostage held in Lebanon, was freed Tuesday night, ending a 28-month ordeal. Released in a clandestine operation here, Mann arrived two hours later in Damascus, hoarsely telling reporters of the harsh treatment he received as a political captive. "My voice has gone after two years of chaining," explained the frail, bewhiskered former pilot. "This morning I started another dreadful day. . . . I wondered how much longer, how much longer.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jack Mann, looking frail but in good spirits, flew into Britain to a hero's welcome after more than two years in solitary confinement at the hands of Lebanese kidnapers. A British television station quoted Mann, 77, as telling his wife, Sunny, that he had been tortured. He said he was chained to a wall and moved from place to place in the trunk of a car. The Shiite Muslim Revolutionary Justice Organization, which released Mann on Tuesday, kept him in almost total isolation, he said.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pro-Iranian kidnapers in Lebanon said they would release British hostage Jack Mann within 48 hours. Mann, 77, was kidnaped in March, 1989. The statement by the Revolutionary Justice Organization was delivered to the Beirut newspaper An Nahar along with a photograph of U.S. hostage Joseph J. Cicippio, who was seized Sept. 12, 1986. The statement praised U.N.
NEWS
May 15, 1989
A West German relief worker surfaced in Lebanon after his abduction 10 days earlier. Markus Quint offered few clues about his disappearance when he spoke with reporters in the southern city of Zahrani, headquarters of the ASME-Humanitas relief group for which he works. He appeared with Nabih Berri, head of the Shiite Muslim militia Amal, who said his organization obtained Quint's release without paying a ransom. He did not name the kidnapers but said "we exerted a lot of pressure and carried out raids."
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | From United Press International
The wife of 75-year-old British hostage Jack Mann said Friday that she was told by "a completely convincing" informant this week that her husband had died in captivity. Sunny Mann said she met with the informant Monday in Muslim West Beirut, where her husband, a retired pilot who had fought in the Battle of Britain in World War II, was kidnaped May 12 as he drove to a bank.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jean Sutherland's students once gave her a plaque that reads: If anything can go wrong, it will. It did. On June 9, 1985, Sutherland's husband, Thomas, was kidnaped along Beirut's airport road as he was returning to the American University of Beirut, where he was dean of the school of agriculture. Now, however, Jean Sutherland is hoping that this particular Murphy's Law is about to be reversed.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | MARILYN RASCHKA and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Briton Jack Mann, frail and angry at 77, the oldest Western hostage held in Lebanon, was freed Tuesday night, ending a 28-month ordeal. Released in a clandestine operation here, Mann arrived two hours later in Damascus, hoarsely telling reporters of the harsh treatment he received as a political captive. "My voice has gone after two years of chaining," explained the frail, bewhiskered former pilot. "This morning I started another dreadful day. . . . I wondered how much longer, how much longer.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pro-Iranian kidnapers in Lebanon said they would release British hostage Jack Mann within 48 hours. Mann, 77, was kidnaped in March, 1989. The statement by the Revolutionary Justice Organization was delivered to the Beirut newspaper An Nahar along with a photograph of U.S. hostage Joseph J. Cicippio, who was seized Sept. 12, 1986. The statement praised U.N.
NEWS
September 21, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I just feel that it's finished," a teary, crestfallen Sunny Mann said Friday in Beirut, underlining the apparent collapse of efforts to free more Western hostages, a tentative deal that broke down in coarse bargaining for lives. Mann's husband Jack, a 77-year-old onetime fighter pilot in the Battle of Britain, had been the name floated for the last 10 days as the next hostage to be released.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jean Sutherland's students once gave her a plaque that reads: If anything can go wrong, it will. It did. On June 9, 1985, Sutherland's husband, Thomas, was kidnaped along Beirut's airport road as he was returning to the American University of Beirut, where he was dean of the school of agriculture. Now, however, Jean Sutherland is hoping that this particular Murphy's Law is about to be reversed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1990
Re Jack Mann's article, "Happily, Today's Youth Have Little to Remember--Yet" (Commentary, May 28): He talked about World War II and Vietnam. What happened to World War I and Korea? All tried to keep our way of life free. R. MARON Newport Beach
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | From United Press International
The wife of 75-year-old British hostage Jack Mann said Friday that she was told by "a completely convincing" informant this week that her husband had died in captivity. Sunny Mann said she met with the informant Monday in Muslim West Beirut, where her husband, a retired pilot who had fought in the Battle of Britain in World War II, was kidnaped May 12 as he drove to a bank.
NEWS
May 15, 1989
A West German relief worker surfaced in Lebanon after his abduction 10 days earlier. Markus Quint offered few clues about his disappearance when he spoke with reporters in the southern city of Zahrani, headquarters of the ASME-Humanitas relief group for which he works. He appeared with Nabih Berri, head of the Shiite Muslim militia Amal, who said his organization obtained Quint's release without paying a ransom. He did not name the kidnapers but said "we exerted a lot of pressure and carried out raids."
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | Associated Press
Jack Mann, 77, a former British hostage held in Lebanon, was released from a British military hospital here Friday after spending nearly a month being treated for pneumonia.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Senior Muslim sources said today that three British hostages held in Lebanon, including Anglican church envoy Terry Waite, will be freed this month. "If all goes well, John McCarthy, Jack Mann and Terry Waite will be released in September," a senior Muslim official told Reuters. The report was confirmed by a senior pro-Iranian source in Beirut.
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