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Jack Mathews

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September 6, 1987 | Larry Ceplair, Ceplair is the author of "The Inquisition in Hollywood" (Doubleday) and the just-released "Under the Shadow of War: Fascism, Anti-Fascism, and Marxists, 1918-1939" (Columbia University Press)
Jack Mathews, a film columnist for The Times, has, according to the jacket copy for "The Battle of Brazil," told "the real story of Terry Gilliam's victory over Hollywood to release his landmark film." Although one might debate the terms "real" and "landmark," Mathews has provided a clear, factual account of the highly publicized struggle for editing control of "Brazil" between director Gilliam and Universal Pictures boss Sidney Sheinberg.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1997 | JACK MATHEWS, Jack Mathews is the film critic at Newsday
Oft expectation fails, and most oft there Where most it promises. --William Shakespeare, "All's Well That Ends Well" * Nothing riles excessive filmmakers, spendthrift studio heads and overpaid stars more than critics who ignore the genius of their work and instead review their budgets. And in a summer when nearly a dozen movies cost more than $80 million, we've reviewed a lot of budgets. It's only natural.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1989
In the July 23 article, "Just How Far Can (or Should) Movies Go?," Jack Mathews questions whether any film can top "Dog Day Afternoon" (1975) or "Slap Shot" (1977) for the amount of F-words used. Brian DePalma's "Scarface" (1983) knocks them both out of the arena. VICTORIA VIDAL Studio City
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1994
Jack Mathews perpetuates a myth in "Can 200 Critics Be Wrong? (Maybe)" (Dec. 26) that is both absurd and destructive. In defending the juxtaposition of violence and humor in movies like "Pulp Fiction," Mathews states that, after disasters, "psychologists gently assure us that the inevitable sick jokes are OK, even healthy. They relieve tension, promote healing--enjoy!" How Mathews can confuse the gallows humor that follows natural disasters with the sick humor of "Pulp Fiction" is difficult to comprehend.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1987
"The Wild Man of Hollywood Meets the Wilds of Borneo" (by Jack Mathews, Nov. 8) was both interesting and informative. However, the cartographer for the article made one error. Jakarta (formerly Batavia), as any fifth-grade student knows, is on the island of Java, not Sumatra as the map indicates. WILLIAM SHATTUC West Covina
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1988
The trouble with Oscar exists perhaps only with writers such as Jack Mathews. He mentions the Oscar turning into a "tribute of colossal insignificance" and then goes on to suggest deleting some of the categories, including best foreign-language film category. The best of traditions should be immune to change. Having grown up in Southern California, I've enjoyed the "Oscar Tradition" all my life. GUSTANO ACOSTA Ontario
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1991
Ray Stark challenges Jack Mathews' credentials in "Producer Turns the Tables on a Film Critic" (Counterpunch, Oct. 28), primarily because he dared to attack the studio chiefs. I would bless Mathews for this. If more such voices were heard, I'm sure the quality of studio product would improve. The present situation where a studio executive that has caused a substantial box-office loss is fired only to be hired at another studio is ridiculous. The same sort of industrial incest helped bring down the S&L industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1986
You've got to be kidding. In Jack Mathews' listing of the movies that should dominate the box office this summer (Film Clips, May 2), which distributors and exhibitors did he talk to . . . the ones in the clothing industry? Sure, "Cobra" seems like a sure thing, but "Poltergiest II," "Aliens" and "Raw Deal" next in order? Let's get serious. If you want to know which movies will be the real winners this summer, then you should have consulted a real insider of the business.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1987
According to Jack Mathews, Robby Benson's new movie, "Do It Up," represents the first time a movie has been shot on video and transferred to film for theatrical release ("Enter the Age of Video-Made Movies," June 1). This may be true if you overlook "Norman, Is That You?," "Harlow," "The TAMI Show," "Hamlet" and the unforgettable "Oh, Calcutta!" Publicists are paid to have short memories--Oliver Stone wants to forget "Seizure" (1974) and so "The Hand" becomes his first film as a director; later he is proud of "Platoon" and so that becomes his first film.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1991
Jack Mathews praises James Cameron's "Terminator 2: Judgment Day" as "one of the greatest action movies of all time" (Film Comment, July 14). Mathews then ridicules the writer-director for his metaphorical analysis of the picture, dismissing Cameron's stated subtexts regarding dehumanization, sanctity of the individual and nonviolence as so much pretentious folly. I don't suppose it ever occurred to Mathews that what sets Cameron's pictures apart from the standard brainless Hollywood blow-'em-ups might just be some sense of thought and intent lurking behind the action.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1993
Jack Mathews made a string of avoidable errors in his commentary, and The Times compounded the problem with phenomenally misdirected headline writing ("Mark Canton's Wrongheaded Chant," April 18). Neither party can claim ignorance about the basis for Mathews' article, which is the Columbia chairman's ShoWest keynote speech (it was sent to every leading journalist, including Mathews and his editors at The Times). Let's start with the headline, which had little to do with the content of Mathews' story and was worthy only of a tabloid.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1991
Ray Stark challenges Jack Mathews' credentials in "Producer Turns the Tables on a Film Critic" (Counterpunch, Oct. 28), primarily because he dared to attack the studio chiefs. I would bless Mathews for this. If more such voices were heard, I'm sure the quality of studio product would improve. The present situation where a studio executive that has caused a substantial box-office loss is fired only to be hired at another studio is ridiculous. The same sort of industrial incest helped bring down the S&L industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1991 | RAY STARK, Stark is chairman of the board of Rastar Productions, whose films include "Night of the Iguana," "Funny Girl," "The Way We Were," "Goodbye Girl," "Peggy Sue Got Married," "Biloxi Blues," "The Secret of My Success," "Steel Magnolias" and the upcoming productions, "Barbarians at the Gate" and "Mr. Jones," which starts filming next month, with Richard Gere and Lena Olin. and
Suppose a reader were to come upon a newspaper column that criticized articles in the Los Angeles Times by Newsday film critic Jack Mathews, reviewing his work in the following manner: 1) Mathews guessed wrong in relentlessly promoting David Puttnam as the savior of Columbia Pictures. Puttnam almost financially destroyed Columbia. 2) Mathews has an unhealthy obsession with director Terry Gilliam: He defends "Brazil" which cost $15 million and had box-office rentals of $4.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1991
Jack Mathews praises James Cameron's "Terminator 2: Judgment Day" as "one of the greatest action movies of all time" (Film Comment, July 14). Mathews then ridicules the writer-director for his metaphorical analysis of the picture, dismissing Cameron's stated subtexts regarding dehumanization, sanctity of the individual and nonviolence as so much pretentious folly. I don't suppose it ever occurred to Mathews that what sets Cameron's pictures apart from the standard brainless Hollywood blow-'em-ups might just be some sense of thought and intent lurking behind the action.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1991 | Information for this issue was compiled by David Pecchia and Kirk Honeycutt.
FOREIGN If the best foreign films you see this year don't even appear on this list, don't blame us. Blame the fickle tastes of critics and the continuing decline of interest among Americans in movies that are made elsewhere. Distributing non-American films is the toughest act in the movie business. How films are received at such festivals as Cannes and Toronto will determine whether attempts are made to get them to theaters in U.S. cities; sometimes it takes an Oscar nomination.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1991 | RAY STARK, Stark is chairman of the board of Rastar Productions, whose films include "Night of the Iguana," "Funny Girl," "The Way We Were," "Goodbye Girl," "Peggy Sue Got Married," "Biloxi Blues," "The Secret of My Success," "Steel Magnolias" and the upcoming productions, "Barbarians at the Gate" and "Mr. Jones," which starts filming next month, with Richard Gere and Lena Olin. and
Suppose a reader were to come upon a newspaper column that criticized articles in the Los Angeles Times by Newsday film critic Jack Mathews, reviewing his work in the following manner: 1) Mathews guessed wrong in relentlessly promoting David Puttnam as the savior of Columbia Pictures. Puttnam almost financially destroyed Columbia. 2) Mathews has an unhealthy obsession with director Terry Gilliam: He defends "Brazil" which cost $15 million and had box-office rentals of $4.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1993
Jack Mathews made a string of avoidable errors in his commentary, and The Times compounded the problem with phenomenally misdirected headline writing ("Mark Canton's Wrongheaded Chant," April 18). Neither party can claim ignorance about the basis for Mathews' article, which is the Columbia chairman's ShoWest keynote speech (it was sent to every leading journalist, including Mathews and his editors at The Times). Let's start with the headline, which had little to do with the content of Mathews' story and was worthy only of a tabloid.
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