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Jack Mccleary

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1995 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Dr. Jack McCleary is a dermatologist who wants to change the face of health care in California. "I would like to see every individual in California involved in their health care," said McCleary, who has a Sherman Oaks practice. "We could sure cut health-care costs a great deal." McCleary, 67, of Hidden Hills, may have a chance to do just that. Last week, he was elected president-elect of the California Medical Assn., the largest state medical association in the nation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1995 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Dr. Jack McCleary is a dermatologist who wants to change the face of health care in California. "I would like to see every individual in California involved in their health care," said McCleary, who has a Sherman Oaks practice. "We could sure cut health-care costs a great deal." McCleary, 67, of Hidden Hills, may have a chance to do just that. Last week, he was elected president-elect of the California Medical Assn., the largest state medical association in the nation.
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NEWS
October 8, 1992
Verdugo Hills Hospital will present forums on Propositions 161 and 166, which will appear on the November ballot. Proposition 161, the physician-assisted death in terminal cases initiative, will be discussed Tuesday. Attorney Michael H. White, president of Californians Against Human Suffering and author of the initiative, will speak in favor of the proposition, and Dr. J. Gale Katterhagen will present the argument against. On Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
The region's two major health-care trade associations warned Wednesday that unless the government pumps more money into the troubled Los Angeles trauma care network, it will collapse as more hospitals withdraw from the 3-year-old program. Officials of the Hospital Council of Southern California and the Los Angeles County Medical Assn. said that a funding program that once provided some reimbursement to trauma hospitals for those indigent patients without insurance should be restored immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1986 | JUDY PASTERNAK, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Medical Assn. is ending its promotional arrangement with a hot line for physicians who want to learn which patients have a history of filing lawsuits. But the Los Angeles Trial Lawyers Assn., which launched a retaliatory service, plans to continue offering information by telephone and through the mail about doctors who have been sued.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1987 | DAVID REYES and HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writers
Medi-Cal patients may find it more difficult to get outpatient treatment for their ailments after a 10% cut in some Medi-Cal payments ordered by the Deukmejian Administration goes into effect Feb. 1, medical leaders say. Not only is the number of private physicians willing to see Medi-Cal patients expected to dwindle as a result of the cuts in their fees, but the patient load at already overburdened facilities like UC Irvine Medical Center is likely to increase, according to health authorities.
NEWS
January 4, 1987 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
Medi-Cal patients may find it more difficult to get outpatient treatment for their ailments after a 10% cut in some Medi-Cal payments ordered by the Deukmejian Administration goes into effect Feb. 1, medical leaders say. Not only is the number of private physicians willing to see Medi-Cal patients expected to dwindle as a result of the cut in their fees, but the patient load at already overburdened county outpatient facilities is likely to increase, according to health authorities.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Skin specialists and drugstores said Monday they had been overrun with inquiries and orders for Retin-A, an acne medication identified late last week as possibly the first medically legitimate treatment for sun-induced skin wrinkles.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1989 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
What do you do when you're floating in the middle of a Hawaiian lagoon and all of a sudden the urge strikes to call the office in Los Angeles? It's no problem if you are radio industry executive Norman J. Pattiz. Pattiz, who was loath to abandon his comfortable inflatable raft during a recent Hawaiian vacation, just reached for his $1,700 portable phone and-- voila-- L.A. was on the line.
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