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Jack Mcgrath

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989
In his letter of July 16, Jack McGrath "responds" to absurd positions that I did not take, either in The Times interview of June 25 or elsewhere. We are not talking here about a Frank Lloyd Wright masterpiece. This contrived controversy is over an obsolete carwash. That anything so bizarre as McGrath's proposal that a carwash be made into a "cultural monument" should receive serious consideration from the city Cultural Heritage Commission, and so much coverage in a respected newspaper like The Times, illustrates the sorry state to which our land-use law has sunk.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1989
In his letter of July 16, Jack McGrath "responds" to absurd positions that I did not take, either in The Times interview of June 25 or elsewhere. We are not talking here about a Frank Lloyd Wright masterpiece. This contrived controversy is over an obsolete carwash. That anything so bizarre as McGrath's proposal that a carwash be made into a "cultural monument" should receive serious consideration from the city Cultural Heritage Commission, and so much coverage in a respected newspaper like The Times, illustrates the sorry state to which our land-use law has sunk.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
In the beginning there were only two of them: Fabian and Dion. Then came other famous single-namers, such as Cher and Madonna. Now make way for Jack. Jack is the irrepressible Jack McGrath, a political consultant running as a write-in candidate in the Los Angeles City Council's 5th District. In a move that has sent election officials scurrying for a legal opinion, McGrath says he wants to jettison his last name and be formally known strictly as Jack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1989
Developer Ira Smedra wants to replace a 60-year-old gas station, a 35-year-old carwash and a 28-year-old cafe at Ventura and laurel Canyon boulevards with a mini-mall. Opponents argue the three structures epitomize San Fernando Valley culture and should be preserved. Others say if a carwash is culture, it's a culture they choose not to embrace. Jack McGrath, a 43-year-old real estate broker, organized the group known as Save Our Corner, which supports preservation of the carwash, gas station and Tiny Naylor's cafe.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Assuming the role of political provocateur in the Los Angeles City Council's sluggish 5th District race, Jack McGrath accused Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky of violating campaign finance laws and dodging debates at a freewheeling press conference Thursday in front of Yaroslavsky's City Hall office. McGrath, a former Yaroslavsky campaign manager and aide, said the councilman has failed to return $1.8 million collected when he considered running for mayor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1989 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
Steve Saltzman, one of Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky's strongest challengers for the 5th District council seat, dropped out of the race Wednesday, leaving the councilman with four opponents leading up to the April 11 election. The strongest remaining challenger now appears to be Laura Lake, a slow-growth candidate who is receiving support from some of the people who helped Ruth Galanter defeat 18-year veteran council member Pat Russell two years ago.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
In the beginning there were only two of them: Fabian and Dion. Then came other famous single-namers, such as Cher and Madonna. Now make way for Jack. Jack is the irrepressible Jack McGrath, a political consultant running as a write-in candidate in the Los Angeles City Council's 5th District. In a move that has sent election officials scurrying for a legal opinion, McGrath says he wants to jettison his last name and be formally known strictly as Jack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky's three opponents usually place an empty chair at his spot on the dais when he skips joint campaign events. The chair is supposed to symbolize Yaroslavsky's absence from the 5th District race, but it also says a lot about the frustrations of running against a powerful incumbent who appears to be in no real danger of losing his seat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Jack McGrath, write-in candidate for the City Council, is a restless man. He is forever pacing, puffing cigarettes and fidgeting with the frames on his wire-rimmed glasses as he plots political strategy for his campaign against his former boss and pal, Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky. Write-in candidates rarely garner more than a small fraction of the vote, but McGrath has some big ideas.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Jack McGrath, write-in candidate for the City Council, is a restless man. He is forever pacing, puffing cigarettes and fidgeting with the frames on his wire-rimmed glasses as he plots political strategy for his campaign against his former boss and pal, Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky. Write-in candidates rarely garner more than a fraction of the vote, but McGrath has some big ideas. First he dropped his last name and recast himself as "Jack."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky's three opponents usually place an empty chair at his spot on the dais when he skips joint campaign events. The chair is supposed to symbolize Yaroslavsky's absence from the 5th District race, but it also says a lot about the frustrations of running against a powerful incumbent who appears to be in no real danger of losing his seat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Jack McGrath, write-in candidate for the City Council, is a restless man. He is forever pacing, puffing cigarettes and fidgeting with the frames on his wire-rimmed glasses as he plots political strategy for his campaign against his former boss and pal, Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky. Write-in candidates rarely garner more than a small fraction of the vote, but McGrath has some big ideas.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Jack McGrath, write-in candidate for the City Council, is a restless man. He is forever pacing, puffing cigarettes and fidgeting with the frames on his wire-rimmed glasses as he plots political strategy for his campaign against his former boss and pal, Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky. Write-in candidates rarely garner more than a fraction of the vote, but McGrath has some big ideas. First he dropped his last name and recast himself as "Jack."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
In the beginning there were only two of them: Fabian and Dion. Then came other famous single-namers, such as Cher and Madonna. Now make way for Jack. Jack is the irrepressible Jack McGrath, a political consultant running as a write-in candidate in the Los Angeles City Council's 5th District. In a move that has sent election officials scurrying for a legal opinion, McGrath says he wants to jettison his last name and be formally known strictly as Jack.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
In the beginning there were only two of them: Fabian and Dion. Then came other famous single-namers, such as Cher and Madonna. Now make way for Jack. Jack is the irrepressible Jack McGrath, a political consultant running as a write-in candidate in the Los Angeles City Council's 5th District. In a move that has sent election officials scurrying for a legal opinion, McGrath says he wants to jettison his last name and be formally known strictly as Jack.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
Assuming the role of political provocateur in the Los Angeles City Council's sluggish 5th District race, Jack McGrath accused Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky of violating campaign finance laws and dodging debates at a freewheeling press conference Thursday in front of Yaroslavsky's City Hall office. McGrath, a former Yaroslavsky campaign manager and aide, said the councilman has failed to return $1.8 million collected when he considered running for mayor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1986 | JAMES QUINN, Times Staff Writer
A Studio City resident Sunday declared his candidacy for the Democratic nomination to run for Assemblyman Gray Davis' seat amid reports that a flock of Westside candidates will join the race. Another Valley resident said he was still exploring the possibility of running. Both men speculated that the anticipated glut of Westside candidates could work to their advantage if those candidates compete for the same votes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1989
Developer Ira Smedra wants to replace a 60-year-old gas station, a 35-year-old carwash and a 28-year-old cafe at Ventura and laurel Canyon boulevards with a mini-mall. Opponents argue the three structures epitomize San Fernando Valley culture and should be preserved. Others say if a carwash is culture, it's a culture they choose not to embrace. Jack McGrath, a 43-year-old real estate broker, organized the group known as Save Our Corner, which supports preservation of the carwash, gas station and Tiny Naylor's cafe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1989 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
Steve Saltzman, one of Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky's strongest challengers for the 5th District council seat, dropped out of the race Wednesday, leaving the councilman with four opponents leading up to the April 11 election. The strongest remaining challenger now appears to be Laura Lake, a slow-growth candidate who is receiving support from some of the people who helped Ruth Galanter defeat 18-year veteran council member Pat Russell two years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1986 | JAMES QUINN, Times Staff Writer
A Studio City resident Sunday declared his candidacy for the Democratic nomination to run for Assemblyman Gray Davis' seat amid reports that a flock of Westside candidates will join the race. Another Valley resident said he was still exploring the possibility of running. Both men speculated that the anticipated glut of Westside candidates could work to their advantage if those candidates compete for the same votes.
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