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Jack Mckeon

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June 20, 2011 | By Mike DiGiovanna
He has more wrinkles than most big league managers, is a little more hunched over, walks with a shuffle and, like many 80-year-olds, he's a little hard of hearing. When it comes to wit, though, Jack McKeon is still as quick and sharp as a top comic. McKeon was introduced Monday as interim manager of the reeling Florida Marlins, making him the second-oldest man to manage in the major leagues since Connie Mack, then 87, closed his career with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1950.
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SPORTS
January 19, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
Tom Lasorda recycles more stories than Reader's Digest, but that doesn't mean he still can't come up with a fresh gem. Saturday night at the annual Professional Baseball Scouts Foundation dinner, he was presenting the Tommy Lasorda Managerial Achievement Award to San Francisco's Bruce Bochy when he got off a good one. “When I said my prayers last night, first I asked God for forgiveness,” Lasorda said. “I said, 'Dear Lord, I'm going to have to give a trophy to ... a Giant.'" Bochy, however, was more than up to the task of receiving his award from Lasorda.
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SPORTS
February 26, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
It is one day before the start of the San Diego Padres' 1989 spring training, and one important club official is still home. He is sitting at a table in a crowded room on the first level of San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium. There are nearly 300 people seated in front of him, many of them holding up post cards and waving them wildly. On one side of each card is a lucky number. On the other side is this man's picture. He is Jack McKeon, known widely as Trader Jack. Welcome to "The Trader Jack Show."
SPORTS
January 8, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Longtime baseball scouts Jack McKeon and Ray Crone Sr. are to be presented with lifetime achievement awards at the 11th "In the Spirit of the Game" gala at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel on Jan. 18. The star-studded banquet, which has become an important part of baseball's winter calendar, is hosted each year by the Professional Baseball Scouts Foundation, an organization founded by former minor league player turned baseball agent Dennis Gilbert...
SPORTS
December 3, 1989 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Padre Manager Jack McKeon's eyelids were at half-mast. His throat was sore. His hair was mussed. It is the eve of the annual baseball winter meetings, and although trade talks won't begin in earnest until today, McKeon admitted that he's exhausted. "I was up all night Friday," McKeon said. "I just couldn't sleep. I laid in bed all night just thinking of everything that we're trying to do."
SPORTS
May 29, 1990 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack McKeon, hoping to celebrate the two-year anniversary of his reign Monday night as Padre manager, instead might have been left wondering after the Padres' 9-5 victory over Philadelphia why he ever subjected himself to this ordeal in the first place. "No one ever said this job would be easy," McKeon said, "but nights like these can drive a man to drinking." Here he was, calmly watching pitcher Bruce Hurst throwing a no-hitter for six innings, while the Padres were cruising to a five-run lead.
SPORTS
June 25, 2011 | By Kevin Baxter
When the Florida Marlins brought Jack McKeon back last week at the age of 80, he became the second-oldest manager in baseball history. Staff writer Kevin Baxter takes a team-by-team look at the oldest men to hold that job with each of the current 30 franchises: Team; Manager; Age (Year); Comment Atlanta; Bobby Cox; 69 (2010); Made playoffs in final season. Arizona; Kirk Gibson; 54 (2011); Former Dodgers hero was a rookie manager at 53. Baltimore; Dave Trembley; 58 (2010)
SPORTS
September 15, 1988
Manager Jack McKeon agreed to a new three-year contract as manager of the San Diego Padres.
SPORTS
February 9, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
The reason can be as vague as a sense that a team isn't motivated, or as obvious as a superstar's rebellion. The decision to change a coach or manager during the season might be made early — the Detroit Tigers were 0-6 when they fired Phil Garner and replaced him with Luis Pujols in 2002 — or late, as when the New York Rangers dismissed Michel Bergeron with two games left in the 1988-89 season. The switch made no difference in either case: The Tigers were 55-100 the rest of the way and the Rangers lost those two games and were swept out of the playoffs, leading to the dismissal of General Manager Phil Esposito.
SPORTS
September 27, 2011 | Wire reports
Chicago White Sox General Manager Ken Williams said Tuesday he's offered to step aside or take another job in the organization after some of his moves failed to pan out and the team foundered. Williams made his comments in the dugout the day after manager Ozzie Guillen was released from his contract with one year remaining. Guillen tweeted Tuesday that he was in town "ready to go" with the Florida Marlins. Williams said he made the offer to White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf and would have understood if the White Sox wanted to put someone else in his seat.
SPORTS
September 3, 2011
Three managers have already been replaced this season and you can bet a few more will be looking for jobs this winter. But while some managers are on a hot seat, others are sitting on a throne with job security for the foreseeable future. Staff writer Kevin Baxter takes a look at the 15 safest and five most vulnerable managers in baseball: Safe at home Mike Scioscia, Angels; Has more control than any manager in baseball — and seven seasons left on his contract. Terry Francona, Boston; His Red Sox clubs average more than 93 wins, so the team will pick up contract options the next two years.
SPORTS
June 25, 2011 | By Kevin Baxter
When the Florida Marlins brought Jack McKeon back last week at the age of 80, he became the second-oldest manager in baseball history. Staff writer Kevin Baxter takes a team-by-team look at the oldest men to hold that job with each of the current 30 franchises: Team; Manager; Age (Year); Comment Atlanta; Bobby Cox; 69 (2010); Made playoffs in final season. Arizona; Kirk Gibson; 54 (2011); Former Dodgers hero was a rookie manager at 53. Baltimore; Dave Trembley; 58 (2010)
SPORTS
June 20, 2011 | By Mike DiGiovanna
The Florida Marlins broke up the monotony of a dismal June with the hiring of 80-year-old interim Manager Jack McKeon, whose introductory news conference Monday injected some much-needed humor into one of baseball's bleakest situations. The respite was temporary. The Marlins went back to their losing ways Monday night, falling to the Angels, 2-1, in Sun Life Stadium, extending their losing streak to 11, which tied a franchise record set twice in 1998, and losing for the 21st time in 23 games.
SPORTS
June 20, 2011 | By Mike DiGiovanna
He has more wrinkles than most big league managers, is a little more hunched over, walks with a shuffle and, like many 80-year-olds, he's a little hard of hearing. When it comes to wit, though, Jack McKeon is still as quick and sharp as a top comic. McKeon was introduced Monday as interim manager of the reeling Florida Marlins, making him the second-oldest man to manage in the major leagues since Connie Mack, then 87, closed his career with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1950.
SPORTS
September 20, 2004
'You can't tell me the Babe was any better than this guy. You can't tell me this guy isn't the best player in the history of the game.' Jack McKeon, Florida Marlin manager, comparing Barry Bonds to Babe Ruth
SPORTS
September 20, 2004
'You can't tell me the Babe was any better than this guy. You can't tell me this guy isn't the best player in the history of the game.' Jack McKeon, Florida Marlin manager, comparing Barry Bonds to Babe Ruth
SPORTS
August 28, 2004
For those who make casual "observations" of Jose Lima and state: "Jose Lima knows the location of every television camera on the lot." Perhaps they should attend a game, arrive early, and observe. Jose Lima (when he is not scheduled to pitch) makes himself available to sign autographs with nary a camera rolling. As a Dodger observer since 1957, I'd have to say it is refreshing to watch a player who loves the position he is in, wants his team to win, and approaches the game with an almost child-like enthusiasm.
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