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Jack O Brien

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"How do I say this?" wonders Jack O'Brien, at an uncharacteristic loss for words. At a table near the back of O'Neal's, an Upper West Side restaurant halfway between Central Park and Lincoln Center, the director has just finished his Sunday morning eggs and bacon. He has arrived at a painful subject, one never far from his thoughts these days: In November, O'Brien's companion of two years, composer James Legg, died in an accident in Legg's apartment. A pause.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2007 | Mike Boehm
Acknowledging that he has become more of a Broadway baby than a steward for San Diego, Jack O'Brien is stepping down after 26 years as artistic director of the Old Globe Theatre. Moonlighting regularly on Broadway since 2000, he has earned three Tony Awards as director of "Hairspray," Shakespeare's "Henry IV" and Tom Stoppard's "The Coast of Utopia."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2007 | Mike Boehm
Acknowledging that he has become more of a Broadway baby than a steward for San Diego, Jack O'Brien is stepping down after 26 years as artistic director of the Old Globe Theatre. Moonlighting regularly on Broadway since 2000, he has earned three Tony Awards as director of "Hairspray," Shakespeare's "Henry IV" and Tom Stoppard's "The Coast of Utopia."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Not long ago they changed the name of the Old Globe Theatre to the Globe Theatres, a switch appealing primarily to either obsessive literalists or compulsive pluralists. But in Southern California the phrases "Old Globe" and "outdoor Shakespeare" are comfortably linked in the public mind. They go together like Stratford and Avon. Or madness and "Twelfth Night."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
Remembering sadness in the happiest of times. If it seems like a Chekhovian concept, so be it. Jack O'Brien, artistic director of the Old Globe, is fulfilling a longtime dream of directing Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya" on the main stage of his theater. The playwright is new to O'Brien's repertoire, and anticipation of the run, which begins Jan. 11 with several of his favorite actors, fills the 50-year-old director with unmitigated delight.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
For Jack O'Brien, artistic director of San Diego's Old Globe Theatre, one of the greatest pleasures of taking time out from his stage duties to direct public television's "I Never Sang for My Father" was watching Daniel J. Travanti wimp out. "He's an excellent wimp," O'Brien said enthusiastically of Travanti, who is best known for his role as that antithesis of wimpdom, tough police Capt. Frank Furillo on "Hill Street Blues."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
The Old Globe Theatre will premiere Neil Simon's latest comedy, "Jake's Women," on Thursday. The inevitable questions follow: Is Simon's story about a man and the women in his life--dead wife, current wife, girlfriend, sister, daughter, therapist--semi-autobiographical? Probably. Simon, whose best work is often semi-autobiographical, seems permanently surrounded by a constellation of women. Is the show going to Broadway after its debut here? Are you kidding?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
A year and a half after "Speed-the-Plow" closed on Broadway, David Mamet's savage glimpse of the movie industry has yet to play Los Angeles. If L.A. theatergoers want to catch the Southern California premiere, they will have to take a 45-mile ride to South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa next month. Given the subject, you would have thought the logical place to revive Mamet's drama was the Mark Taper Forum, within a stone's throw of Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Well, knock me over with a copy of Catullus. "The Invention of Love," Tom Stoppard's 1997 play about the sometime poet and devoted Latin scholar A.E. Housman, has become the improbable snob hit of the current Broadway season. It recently extended its Lincoln Center Theater run at the Lyceum Theatre through July. How did this happen? Especially when one of Stoppard's true masterworks, "Arcadia," made far less of a dent (in another Lincoln Center presentation) six years ago?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Not long ago they changed the name of the Old Globe Theatre to the Globe Theatres, a switch appealing primarily to either obsessive literalists or compulsive pluralists. But in Southern California the phrases "Old Globe" and "outdoor Shakespeare" are comfortably linked in the public mind. They go together like Stratford and Avon. Or madness and "Twelfth Night."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Well, knock me over with a copy of Catullus. "The Invention of Love," Tom Stoppard's 1997 play about the sometime poet and devoted Latin scholar A.E. Housman, has become the improbable snob hit of the current Broadway season. It recently extended its Lincoln Center Theater run at the Lyceum Theatre through July. How did this happen? Especially when one of Stoppard's true masterworks, "Arcadia," made far less of a dent (in another Lincoln Center presentation) six years ago?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"How do I say this?" wonders Jack O'Brien, at an uncharacteristic loss for words. At a table near the back of O'Neal's, an Upper West Side restaurant halfway between Central Park and Lincoln Center, the director has just finished his Sunday morning eggs and bacon. He has arrived at a painful subject, one never far from his thoughts these days: In November, O'Brien's companion of two years, composer James Legg, died in an accident in Legg's apartment. A pause.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1998 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Playwright A.R. (Pete) Gurney, 67, and director Jack O'Brien 58, sit next to each other, tired from a long day in the rehearsal hall, with the ease of old friends--which they are.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1993 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
Jack O'Brien was rehearsing Shakespeare's "The Winter's Tale" at the Old Globe Theatre here last year when managing director Thomas Hall interrupted with a question. Would O'Brien be interested in directing a major revival of "Damn Yankees" at the Old Globe? "I just lit up and said, 'Absolutely, I'd love to,' " recalls O'Brien. "Then I went on with my rehearsal." It was business as usual for the Old Globe's energetic artistic director.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
A year and a half after "Speed-the-Plow" closed on Broadway, David Mamet's savage glimpse of the movie industry has yet to play Los Angeles. If L.A. theatergoers want to catch the Southern California premiere, they will have to take a 45-mile ride to South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa next month. Given the subject, you would have thought the logical place to revive Mamet's drama was the Mark Taper Forum, within a stone's throw of Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
The Old Globe Theatre will premiere Neil Simon's latest comedy, "Jake's Women," on Thursday. The inevitable questions follow: Is Simon's story about a man and the women in his life--dead wife, current wife, girlfriend, sister, daughter, therapist--semi-autobiographical? Probably. Simon, whose best work is often semi-autobiographical, seems permanently surrounded by a constellation of women. Is the show going to Broadway after its debut here? Are you kidding?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1998 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Playwright A.R. (Pete) Gurney, 67, and director Jack O'Brien 58, sit next to each other, tired from a long day in the rehearsal hall, with the ease of old friends--which they are.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1993 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
Jack O'Brien was rehearsing Shakespeare's "The Winter's Tale" at the Old Globe Theatre here last year when managing director Thomas Hall interrupted with a question. Would O'Brien be interested in directing a major revival of "Damn Yankees" at the Old Globe? "I just lit up and said, 'Absolutely, I'd love to,' " recalls O'Brien. "Then I went on with my rehearsal." It was business as usual for the Old Globe's energetic artistic director.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1990 | NANCY CHURNIN
Remembering sadness in the happiest of times. If it seems like a Chekhovian concept, so be it. Jack O'Brien, artistic director of the Old Globe, is fulfilling a longtime dream of directing Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya" on the main stage of his theater. The playwright is new to O'Brien's repertoire, and anticipation of the run, which begins Jan. 11 with several of his favorite actors, fills the 50-year-old director with unmitigated delight.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
For Jack O'Brien, artistic director of San Diego's Old Globe Theatre, one of the greatest pleasures of taking time out from his stage duties to direct public television's "I Never Sang for My Father" was watching Daniel J. Travanti wimp out. "He's an excellent wimp," O'Brien said enthusiastically of Travanti, who is best known for his role as that antithesis of wimpdom, tough police Capt. Frank Furillo on "Hill Street Blues."
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