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Jack Paar

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July 5, 1990 | From Times wire services
Hugh Downs, who served as sidekick to Jack Paar during his five years as host of "The Tonight Show," said he considers Paar his special television hero. Downs, co-host of the ABC's "20/20," says in Sunday's Parade magazine that he also admires Barbara Walters and Jane Pauley. Of Paar, Downs said: "I owe him a debt. He was always upfront, always showing his emotions. And never devious.' He paused, then added, 'A bit strange, perhaps."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2013
Frank Tripucka Broncos quarterback in first AFL season Frank Tripucka, 85, who quarterbacked the Denver Broncos in their inaugural AFL season and later allowed his No. 18 to be unretired so Peyton Manning could wear it, died Thursday in Woodland Park, N.J., the Broncos announced. His family said he had congestive heart failure. A former standout at Notre Dame, Tripucka played for the Detroit Lions, Chicago Cardinals and Dallas Texans in the NFL and for Saskatchewan and Ottawa in Canada.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jose Melis, 85, the bandleader for the "The Tonight Show" when Jack Paar was its host, died April 7 of a respiratory infection at a hospital in Sun City, Ariz. Born in Havana, Melis trained as a classical pianist at the Havana Conservatory and at the Juilliard School of Music in New York City. Drafted into the Army during World War II, he served as the musical director of the 40-member USO orchestra in New York City. He became a naturalized U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The large child known as Jonathan Winters died Friday at age 87. Accompanying him into the now-noisier hereafter were the multitudes he contained, a cast of men, women, children of every race and nationality, rich and poor, city and country. Some were characters with names to whom the comedian would return - Maude Frickert, the go-go granny - but more of them existed for a minute or less, brought into focus, played with and then sent on their way, as another appeared in their place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Dody Goodman, a comedian and character actress who gained fame as the resident zany on Jack Paar's late-night show and as the ditsy matriarch on the soap opera send-up "Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman," has died. She was believed to be 93. Goodman died Sunday at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center in New Jersey, said Ann-Marie De Feis, a spokeswoman for the Actors Fund Homes in Englewood, where Goodman had been living. A cause of death was not announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1991 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
He sounds the same as ever--ebullient, a little nervous, blistering in his comments. Jack Paar, one of television's genuine legends, is 72--"but I act like 35," he says with the same old confidence. "I always did." No TV series has had a more consistently brilliant group of hosts than NBC's "The Tonight Show," and Paar was the one in the middle, between Steve Allen and Johnny Carson. Allen delivered a wondrous comic lunacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1991 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Reading in a recent Sunday Calendar the bill of fare for this year's Museum of Broadcasting Television Festival at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, you realize all over again how thoroughly the medium has saturated the national memory, imagination and perception of the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Jack Paar, who kept millions of Americans up past their bedtimes as the mercurial host of "The Tonight Show" in the late 1950s and early '60s and set the standard for the talk-show format with his eclectic mix of urbane and witty guests, died Tuesday. He was 85. Paar, who had a stroke in March, died at his home in Greenwich, Conn., said Stephen Wells, his son-in-law. Paar's wife, Miriam, and daughter, Randy, were by his side. He was the original "King of Late Night."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jack Paar was, by almost any evaluation, one of the architects of contemporary television. His stint on late-night television from 1957 to 1962 laid the framework, the attitude and the shtick for virtually every night-owl talk show on the air today. "Jack Paar: As I Was Saying . . ."
NEWS
February 5, 1989
Jack Douglas, an Emmy Award-winning comedy writer and a frequent guest and foil for Jack Paar on the old "Tonight Show" has died. He was 80. Douglas died Tuesday in a Los Angeles hospital, where he was admitted with pneumonia, said Mary Ann Sauvage of George Schlatter Productions. "He saw the world from a different angle than the rest of us. He was not only funny, he was nice," said George Schlatter, creator and producer of television's "Laugh-In."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2013 | By Dennis McLellan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Comic great Jonathan Winters was struggling to make a name for himself in the early 1950s when a man at the nightclub where he was performing offered some life-changing advice. Winters had a talent for channeling the voices of celebrities like Gary Cooper and Boris Karloff but, the man observed, "All you're doing is shining their shoes. You'd best think up your own characters. " That, Winters told TV Guide many years later, was "the best hunk of criticism I ever got. " With his rubbery, moon-shaped face and pitch-perfect ear for speech patterns, Winters began to unleash a cavalcade of charmingly twisted characters, including a redneck ballplayer, a lisping child and a prissy schoolmarm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2008 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Dody Goodman, a comedian and character actress who gained fame as the resident zany on Jack Paar's late-night show and as the ditsy matriarch on the soap opera send-up "Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman," has died. She was believed to be 93. Goodman died Sunday at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center in New Jersey, said Ann-Marie De Feis, a spokeswoman for the Actors Fund Homes in Englewood, where Goodman had been living. A cause of death was not announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jose Melis, 85, the bandleader for the "The Tonight Show" when Jack Paar was its host, died April 7 of a respiratory infection at a hospital in Sun City, Ariz. Born in Havana, Melis trained as a classical pianist at the Havana Conservatory and at the Juilliard School of Music in New York City. Drafted into the Army during World War II, he served as the musical director of the 40-member USO orchestra in New York City. He became a naturalized U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Jack Paar, who kept millions of Americans up past their bedtimes as the mercurial host of "The Tonight Show" in the late 1950s and early '60s and set the standard for the talk-show format with his eclectic mix of urbane and witty guests, died Tuesday. He was 85. Paar, who had a stroke in March, died at his home in Greenwich, Conn., said Stephen Wells, his son-in-law. Paar's wife, Miriam, and daughter, Randy, were by his side. He was the original "King of Late Night."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jack Paar was, by almost any evaluation, one of the architects of contemporary television. His stint on late-night television from 1957 to 1962 laid the framework, the attitude and the shtick for virtually every night-owl talk show on the air today. "Jack Paar: As I Was Saying . . ."
NEWS
May 4, 1997 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday "Connections 3" / 5-8 p.m. and 8-11 p.m. TLC Ever eager to learn more about the world around him, host James Burke returns with the third installment of his science-history series. According to Burke, this is a show "that travels across the great web of knowledge through space and time to find the strangest connection between things."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1991 | RICK DU BROW
Probably no new host in the storied history of "The Tonight Show" has faced as much pressure as Jay Leno in taking over the series. This is NBC's most valuable franchise--the show with which Johnny Carson helped keep the network alive in tough times, sometimes bringing in as much as 20% of the broadcasting company's income. And now NBC is handing Leno the key to the vault at a time when, more than ever, it will be struggling for survival as network audiences dwindle. But there's more.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1991 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
He sounds the same as ever--ebullient, a little nervous, blistering in his comments. Jack Paar, one of television's genuine legends, is 72--"but I act like 35," he says with the same old confidence. "I always did." No TV series has had a more consistently brilliant group of hosts than NBC's "The Tonight Show," and Paar was the one in the middle, between Steve Allen and Johnny Carson. Allen delivered a wondrous comic lunacy.
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