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Jack Palance

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2006 | Myrna Oliver, Special to The Times
Jack Palance, the leather-faced, gravelly voiced actor who earned Academy Award nominations for "Sudden Fear" and "Shane," and who finally captured the Oscar almost 40 years later as the crusty trail boss in the 1991 comedy western "City Slickers," has died. He was 87. Palance, who had been in failing health with a number of maladies, died Friday of natural causes at the Montecito home of his daughter Holly, family members said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
There was no shortage of chuckles, guffaws, sniggers, giggles and flat-out belly laughs at the Saturday afternoon panel discussion "Make Me Laugh! Humor Writing Across Genres" at the Festival of Books, which featured Mary Lou Belli, Sandra Tsing Loh and Michael Price, and was moderated by M.G. Lord. The panelists held forth for an hour (they and the audience seemed full well ready to clock a second hour), in front of an overflowing crowd, about the TV shows that helped shape their sense of humor ("F Troop," "MASH" and "Get Smart" among them)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1993 | SCOTT HARRIS
The brochure makes Steve Harris seem like just another businessman, a guy out to sell a product and a system, even if his field is a bit unusual. Harris--no kin of mine--is a cowboy. He used to be the kind of cowboy who drove cattle and managed ranches. He used to, as they say, "break" horses, by using physical force and ropes to hobble the hind legs. Saddle 'em up and show 'em who's boss. But these days Steve Harris might be considered a New Age cowboy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2006 | Myrna Oliver, Special to The Times
Jack Palance, the leather-faced, gravelly voiced actor who earned Academy Award nominations for "Sudden Fear" and "Shane," and who finally captured the Oscar almost 40 years later as the crusty trail boss in the 1991 comedy western "City Slickers," has died. He was 87. Palance, who had been in failing health with a number of maladies, died Friday of natural causes at the Montecito home of his daughter Holly, family members said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1995 | Lawrence Christon, Lawrence Christon is a Times staff writer
As an Army Air Force bomber pilot, Lt. Voladimir Palahnuik hadn't seen combat action in World War II beyond some submarine- bombing runs, when one day an engine conked out while he was at the controls. Takeoff and landing are the worst times for any aircraft to lose an engine. For the AT-9 trainer, the loss of one of its two props as it left the ground in Pampa, Tex., created an instant and catastrophic dead weight.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1993 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Get in Training: A memorable moment on last year's Oscar telecast was actor Jack Palance doing one-arm pushups in front of the black-tie industry audience to show off his virility. The actor will be back on stage again this year as a presenter for the 65th annual Academy Awards on March 29, it was announced on Thursday. No word yet on what he plans for an encore, however.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1993
Regarding "What's Billy Crystal Gonna Do Without Hannibal Lecter and Jack Palance?" and " 'The Crying Game' Guessing Game Makes Big News in a Slow Year" (March 28): Was it really necessary to give away the secret of "The Crying Game" in these two separate articles? If a writer feels he or she absolutely must reveal the film's secret, why not just put a spoiler's warning before any article (or portion of an article) that gives too much away? It's really not that difficult. Just write: "The following article reveals the secret of 'The Crying Game.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Silence of the Lambs," the suspenseful but gruesome psychological thriller centering on an FBI trainee's battle of nerves with a diabolical psychiatrist-turned-cannibal, swept the Oscars Monday night, winning the statuette for best picture and picking up four other honors during the 64th annual Academy Awards ceremony. The award for best actress went to Jodie Foster, who played the FBI trainee assigned to hunt down a second serial murderer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
There was no shortage of chuckles, guffaws, sniggers, giggles and flat-out belly laughs at the Saturday afternoon panel discussion "Make Me Laugh! Humor Writing Across Genres" at the Festival of Books, which featured Mary Lou Belli, Sandra Tsing Loh and Michael Price, and was moderated by M.G. Lord. The panelists held forth for an hour (they and the audience seemed full well ready to clock a second hour), in front of an overflowing crowd, about the TV shows that helped shape their sense of humor ("F Troop," "MASH" and "Get Smart" among them)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1995 | Lawrence Christon, Lawrence Christon is a Times staff writer
As an Army Air Force bomber pilot, Lt. Voladimir Palahnuik hadn't seen combat action in World War II beyond some submarine- bombing runs, when one day an engine conked out while he was at the controls. Takeoff and landing are the worst times for any aircraft to lose an engine. For the AT-9 trainer, the loss of one of its two props as it left the ground in Pampa, Tex., created an instant and catastrophic dead weight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1993 | SCOTT HARRIS
The brochure makes Steve Harris seem like just another businessman, a guy out to sell a product and a system, even if his field is a bit unusual. Harris--no kin of mine--is a cowboy. He used to be the kind of cowboy who drove cattle and managed ranches. He used to, as they say, "break" horses, by using physical force and ropes to hobble the hind legs. Saddle 'em up and show 'em who's boss. But these days Steve Harris might be considered a New Age cowboy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1993
Regarding "What's Billy Crystal Gonna Do Without Hannibal Lecter and Jack Palance?" and " 'The Crying Game' Guessing Game Makes Big News in a Slow Year" (March 28): Was it really necessary to give away the secret of "The Crying Game" in these two separate articles? If a writer feels he or she absolutely must reveal the film's secret, why not just put a spoiler's warning before any article (or portion of an article) that gives too much away? It's really not that difficult. Just write: "The following article reveals the secret of 'The Crying Game.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH
In the year of "Dances With Wolves," Oscar show emcee Billy Crystal arrived onstage to open the ceremonies atop a horse; last year, he was wheeled out wearing a Hannibal Lecter-style mask and restraints, parodying "The Silence of the Lambs." But this year, with dour or talky or less well-known art-house films up for awards, Crystal's entrance is proving to be something of a challenge for his writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1993 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Get in Training: A memorable moment on last year's Oscar telecast was actor Jack Palance doing one-arm pushups in front of the black-tie industry audience to show off his virility. The actor will be back on stage again this year as a presenter for the 65th annual Academy Awards on March 29, it was announced on Thursday. No word yet on what he plans for an encore, however.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Silence of the Lambs," the suspenseful but gruesome psychological thriller centering on an FBI trainee's battle of nerves with a diabolical psychiatrist-turned-cannibal, swept the Oscars Monday night, winning the statuette for best picture and picking up four other honors during the 64th annual Academy Awards ceremony. The award for best actress went to Jodie Foster, who played the FBI trainee assigned to hunt down a second serial murderer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH
In the year of "Dances With Wolves," Oscar show emcee Billy Crystal arrived onstage to open the ceremonies atop a horse; last year, he was wheeled out wearing a Hannibal Lecter-style mask and restraints, parodying "The Silence of the Lambs." But this year, with dour or talky or less well-known art-house films up for awards, Crystal's entrance is proving to be something of a challenge for his writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1995
I enjoyed Lawrence Christon's article on Jack Palance ("Home on the Range," April 30). I was, however, greatly surprised at the quotation attributed to unnamed producers of "Ripley's Believe It or Not" television series that "he made life so miserable for the producers that they actually hated it when for years the show got renewed." I'd like to set the record straight! The series was produced by Columbia Pictures Television, whose president I was at the time, and came under my supervision.
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