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Jack R Dymond

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August 8, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
As a high-tech explorer begins rising through 1,500 feet of frigid water in this volcanic lake, total darkness gives way to an eerie gray glow above him. It is the summer sunlight. At 1,200 feet--about as deep as the Empire State Building is tall--the sun's rays still penetrate the dazzlingly clear waters of the nation's deepest lake.
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NEWS
August 8, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
As a high-tech explorer begins rising through 1,500 feet of frigid water in this volcanic lake, total darkness gives way to an eerie gray glow above him. It is the summer sunlight. At 1,200 feet--about as deep as the Empire State Building is tall--the sun's rays still penetrate the dazzlingly clear waters of the nation's deepest lake.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Jack R. Dymond, 64, a retired Oregon State University professor and an oceanographer who was the first to explore the bottom of Crater Lake in Oregon, drowned Sept. 20 while fishing in Oregon's Rogue River. In 1977, Dymond was a lead investigator on a research cruise that made an important discovery at the Galapagos Rift on the ocean floor west of Ecuador. He and other scientists were the first to spot hydrothermal vents, where warm, mineral-rich fluids spew from beneath the sea floor.
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